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Make It Visual – “Story-Boarding” the Story of Your Fully Engaged ...

Make It Visual – “Story-Boarding” the Story of Your Fully Engaged ... | Current Updates | Scoop.it
Company's live a never-ending story: I've got to re-engage my teams. They have that story because of a never-ending problem. No, two: Engagement wears.

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Karen Dietz's comment, January 21, 2013 1:05 PM
Thank you Brad!
Brad Tollefson's comment, January 21, 2013 3:52 PM
Thank you! Karen
Oakville Deals's curator insight, January 22, 2013 11:29 AM

Reasons why story telling works so well. Good article.

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How Storytelling Can Address the Complex and Intertwining Issues of Modern Society

How Storytelling Can Address the Complex and Intertwining Issues of Modern Society | Current Updates | Scoop.it
How Storytelling Can Address the Complex and Intertwining Issues of Modern Society

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, December 27, 2012 2:57 PM

Business can be complex. Leadership can be complex. Certainly our culture and society is complex.


This article gets us thinking -- and includes some fabulous advice -- about how storytelling can help us wade through complex issues, make better decisions, and find a path forward.


Today. Right now. As 2013 approaches, let's continue to use stories well, to help grow and excel, instead of to diminish others.


There are wise and uplifting words in this piece and steps to take. Let's go this route. Happy New Year everyone.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

SPY INDIA's comment, December 28, 2012 11:38 PM
http://www.scoop.it/u/vimlesh-kumar#curatedTopicsTabSelected
DPG plc's curator insight, December 30, 2012 6:49 AM

Stories are how people learn....

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Organizational Storytelling: an interview with Paul Smith

A dialogue on the subject of organizational storytelling; narrative as a leadership capability. Author and story consultant David Hutchens of www.DavidHutche...

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, December 4, 2012 11:49 AM

Woo hoo! Here are two of my favorite colleagues -- David Hutchens and Paul Smith -- talking about Paul's recent book Lead With A Story.


Paul, who works for Proctor and Gamble, shares with us his insights about storytelling and leadership based not only on his research with CEOs around the country, but also from his own corporate expeirence. That's what I love -- a guy in the trenches sharing lessons with us all.


Now David is no slouch either and is one of the earliest practitioners of working with stories in organizations around knowledge management, knowledge transfer, and systems thinking. He's been on my bookshelf for years now, and I always enjoy our conversations together.


This 60-minute video -- from a Google Hangout that happened a few days ago -- is great. I love the questions David asks and I love what Paul shares with us -- stories about PPTs, how to avoid being a boring, and learning who the real hero is. And that's just for starters!


Thanks guys for a terrific session.


Hey -- each one of you is a leader in your own right. Take the time to dig in here and get even better as a leader!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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The Last Brochure You’ll Ever Need -- Story Works

The Last Brochure You’ll Ever Need -- Story Works | Current Updates | Scoop.it

"Have you ever looked at your marketing materials and thought, “that’s not really me?” Been there. In fact, my (thankfully last) resume comes to mind. And, oddly, my mind wandered a bit, thinking how most marketing materials similarly fail to tell us what’s really unique about a brand."

 

Well, I am embarrassed to admit this, but the author of Story Works, Sharlene Sones, asked me to review her new e-book months ago -- and I am just now getting to it. My apologies Sharlene! But better late than never I guess.

 

I love this book. For several reasons:


Size & readabililty -- this book is constructed so you can easily flip through it. And it is laid out so it is easy to read and digest. Perfect! I can't tell you how many posts and e-books I ignore because the layout makes it too hard to read. And I wouldn't want to subject you to that either. Sharlene's book is a breeze to walk through.

 

Content -- Sharlene does a masterful job at guiding us through the business applications of story. She touches on everything from marketing/branding, unique proposition, sales, to leadership, culture, career development, and back. Whew! That's a lot of territory to cover. But she does it well.

 

Sharlene explains how story will make a difference in these areas -- and WHY it does. And she gives us tips for using story in several applications. As a bonus, there are lots of story quotes to add to your list, along with examples from companies to make her points.

 

What I particularly like is her focus on story as conversation -- and that story sharing is where the real leverage is in org story work.

 

I may quibble a bit on some of Sharlene's points -- are testimonials really stories? Depends on the definition you use. For me, not so much. But the bulk of Sharlene's material is so right on, I am not going to be so picky.

 

Sharlene also tackles 'engagement' as a topic and brings to light the story dynamics involved in that. I think there is still a lot to learn about storytelling and engagement in business, but this gives us a good start.

 

I wish there had been more focus on listening, too. Implied in Sharlene's book is how transformative stories can be in business. A lot of what she talks about is story at the transactional level -- even when story provides inspiration and meaning. For example -- when a business is really in the story groove, stories have the potential to change both the teller and listener. Story as transformation in business is the next frontier I think.

 

I could say more, but I'm running out of space. This book is inspirational and a good kick in the pants for bringing story into your core business activities. If you want a great e-book primer on business storytelling, this is it.

 

If you want to go deeper, dig into the books by Annette Simmons and Steve Denning.

 

You do have to buy this book. But you can also download a chapter for free. I have absolutely no affiliation with Sharlene other than we are colleagues and both went to grad school at the Univ. of Pennsylvania.

 

Happy reading!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

 


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Three Elements of Great Communication, According to Aristotle

Three Elements of Great Communication, According to Aristotle | Current Updates | Scoop.it
The first master of the art believed in ethos, pathos, and logos.

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, January 18, 2013 1:19 PM

Aristotle and his criteria for effective storytelling still rock after all these years!


This article is a great re-cap of ethos, pathos, and logos. Miss any one of these and you are toast.


The author Scott Edinger's explainations of these are very clear and concise. Pay attention to these 3 elements and for sure you will be a better communicator and storyteller.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

ozziegontang's curator insight, January 20, 2013 5:28 AM

This is what I shared:

 

Enjoyed reading your article. 

 

Wanted to share a quote from my mentor,  Lee Thayer.  In the opening chapter of his book “Communication!: A Radically new Approach to Life’s Most Perplexing Problem” he shared:-----

 

 “…what “communicates” is the interpretation that someone makes of a happening, a situation, an image, or an utterance. A person may be listening to you. But what that person is hearing is not what you said, but her own interpretation of what you may (or may not) have said. All of the actual consequences of any communication encounter flow from the interpretations that people make of things. That may or may not be what was intended. But the power player in any communication situation is the “receiver,” not the “sender.”-----

 

“…Never mistake your interpretation for reality. Just know that you have to live with the consequences of how you, and others, interpret things.   What “communicates’” is whatever a person pays attention to and however she interprets it. You do not control her interpretations, nor does she control yours. That’s how the process works. If you have a different conception of the process, you may want to consider this one. It has far fewer bumps in the road, fewer problems.”-----

 

 

The 9 or 10 books Lee’s written in the past  5 or 6 years contain the seminal ideas he’s been sharing on Communication, Leadership and  high performance organizations for the past 45 years.  And most people have never heard of him.

Karen Dietz's comment, January 21, 2013 1:08 PM
Wonderful comments Ozzie and I agree completely. When I teach MBA students in business communication the entire class is an experience of this. We are always in a state of conveying and refining meaning and living with the interpretations of others. We can experience alignment in meaning, but it takes work. It can be especially difficult when interpretations remain different despite all our efforts. In the end, I think effective communication is the best self-development tool we have around!
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10 Tips to Help You Make an Impact with Your Story - Giving Voice to Your Story

10 Tips to Help You Make an Impact with Your Story - Giving Voice to Your Story | Current Updates | Scoop.it

"To truly give voice to your story in a way that feels right for yourself and your business, you need the following ingredients which if you’ll notice, these tips can also be adapted to help you live a more fulfilling and happier life:"


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Karen Dietz's curator insight, December 19, 2012 3:21 PM

I LOVE this list -- because it is totally different than what you might expect from yet another article with a storytelling list!


Here the author Dorit Sasson focuses on YOUR relationship with the story you want to tell -- and how to get emotionally clear about it before you ever tell it.


Now why in the heck is this important? Because stories are all about conveying emotion and engaging emotions along the way to delivering a key message and meaning.


But if you are not clear about your emotional connection to the story, chances are you will flop when sharing it. You won't connect to your audience. 


So go grab this list. Check off what you can. Work on what you need to. Get way better at storytelling.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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The power of a spoken word

The power of a spoken word | Current Updates | Scoop.it

Storytellers change their presentation style in different situations. What is suitable for an intimate venue, will not work as well in a large venue. What works for a circle of ten people, does not work in the same way for a circle of twenty-five. Even the hour of day, among many other things, might call for a different capacity or approach. Not everything is possible or fit for storytelling. Amplification might solve a volume issue but it doesn’t do much for intimacy. On the other hand there are situations where it does. The way to gain ‘elasticity’ that will enable a storyteller to adapt as needed, is by learning how to stretch and fold his own wings. It’s like learning how to diminish and increase sound in music. It’s not only changing the volume – the entire sound-production mechanism adapts.

 

[Image credit: brewbooks on Flickr]

 

Ahhh -- words of wisdom from one of my colleagues and favorite storytellers -- Llimor Shiponi. This post of hers is all about storytelling elasticity and the power of oral storytelling.

 

In this electronic age when digital storytelling is often viewed as THE SOLUTION -- this post is a reminder that oral storytelling is still the gold standard.

 

Want executive presence? Focus on building oral storytelling skills and sharing your stories in person as often as you can.

 

Want to increase business? Focus on building oral storytelling skills and sharing your stories in person as often as you can.

 

There's no substitute. Enjoy Limor's wise words of wisdom here!

 

And thank you Gregg Morris @greggvm for originally finding and sharing this article!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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