Information Techn...
Follow
Find
3.4K views | +1 today
Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends
Based on current trends in the IT industry, what might be the five most important technologies in the next 5 to 10 years?
Curated by Rachel May
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Rachel May from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

The Smartphone Physical: The evolution of the checkup

The Smartphone Physical: The evolution of the checkup | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it

Imagine a comprehensive, clinically relevant well-patient checkup using only smartphone-based devices.  The data is immediately readable and fully uploadable to an electronic health record. The patient understands – and even participates – in the interaction far beyond faking a cough and gulping a deep breath.

 

For real?

 

Johns Hopkins medical student and Medgadget editor Shiv Gaglani says it is not only possible, but may in fact be the checkup of the future. Gaglani and a team of current and future physicians will do a first-of-its kind demo of a “smartphone physical” for hundreds of attendees at TEDMED 2013.

 

The checkup will capture quantitative and qualitative data, ranging from simple readings of weight and blood pressure to more complex readings such as heart rhythm strips and optic discs. Measurements and instruments will include:

 

• Body analysis using an iHealth Scale.

 

• Blood pressure reading using a Withings BP Monitor.

 

• Oxygen saturation/pulse measured simultaneously with blood pressure,

using an Masimo iSpO2 placed on the left ring finger.

 

• Visual acuity via an EyeNetra phone case.

 

• Optic disc visualization using a Welch Allyn iExaminer case attached to a 

PanOptic Ophthalmoscope.

 

• Ear drum visualization with a CellScope phone case.

 

• Lung function using a SpiroSmart Spirometer app to conduct a

respirometer test.

 

•Heart electrophysiology using the AliveCor Heart Monitor.

 

•Body sounds: A digital stethoscope from ThinkLabs auscultates and amplifies the sounds of a patients lungs and heart.

 

• Carotid artery visualization using a Mobisante probe.


Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rachel May from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Wearable tech full of potential for health care applications

Wearable tech full of potential for health care applications | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it

It’s exactly what it sounds like. ‘Wearable technology’ involves sensors that are worn in something like a bracelet, that gather information and send the data to a computer via bluetooth.

 

This technology is now being developed for use across a range of health-related applications. New research suggests that it could be used to help prevent seizures in people living with epilepsy.

 

“We build sensors that allow people to measure information from the surface of their skin and this information changes with your activity, with your stress, with your sleep.”

 

MIT professor Rosalind Picard says she and her team discovered by accident that the technology can recognize 100 percent of large epileptic seizures through changes in the skin.

 

“We were quite surprised one day when we looked at the data and the biggest peak I’ve ever seen in my whole life was present. I thought the sensor was broken. And it turned out it was a seizure in a small boy,” says Picard.

 

“Since then we have done careful, controlled studies and we have 100 percent of grand mal seizures showing enormous responses on the skin sensor.”


Via nrip
more...
Art Jones's curator insight, April 7, 2013 8:28 PM

MIT team working with wearable tech designed to detect and measure small changes on the surface of the skin. #Amazing

Brenda Elliott's curator insight, April 8, 2013 7:59 AM

Great advances-

Fatima Zunara's curator insight, October 19, 11:55 AM

capteurs et santé

Scooped by Rachel May
Scoop.it!

Ray Kurzweil: Your Brain in the Cloud | Ray Kurzweil | Big Think

Ray Kurzweil: Your Brain in the Cloud | Ray Kurzweil | Big Think | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it
We are going to create synthetic neocortexes in order to extend the power of our own neocortex.
Rachel May's insight:

1. Artificial Intelligence

 

Futurist and Google employee, Ray Kurzweil, provides some insight in to his current project at Google of building Artificial Intelligence. His central focus in design in reproducing the human neo-cortex which, as well as allowing us to think logically, also deals in metaphors; contributing to our appreciation of a poem or other beauty.

 

This is a very interesting read - inside the mind of a true inventor. Also interesting that again this technology links back to working connectively through the cloud - which is a consistent theme in most articles discussing the current and future states of technology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel May
Scoop.it!

Report: Amazon Is Building The CIA’s New Cloud-Computing System

Report: Amazon Is Building The CIA’s New Cloud-Computing System | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it
The CIA has reportedly signed a massive cloud-computing deal with Amazon, worth up to $US600 million over the next 10 years. FCW reports that its sour...
Rachel May's insight:

2 Cloud Computing

 

An unconfirmed report of a deal between the CIA and Amazon for the development of a cloud computing network. An industry clearly that is currently booming and worth millions, while at the same time offering cost effective advancements in technology for customers.

 

With the CIA also releasing a statement saying it needs to find a way to monitor more email traffic, is the extension in to infinite computing their answer?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel May
Scoop.it!

Active in Cloud, Amazon Reshapes Computing

Active in Cloud, Amazon Reshapes Computing | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it
Amazon is quietly upending the world of business computing through its cloud operations, a vast resource that gives companies heavy computing power without the baseline costs.
Rachel May's insight:

2 Cloud Computing

 

The article discusses Amazon's growth in the industry of cloud computing, and also discusses it's many benefits for companies the world over including increased productivity resulting in more cost effective products.

 

Large companies like Amazon that have many data centres may be more reliable than a smaller company. Hopefully smaller providers have airtight business continuity plans, or they may find themselves in court for loss of profits. Or at least, cashing in on insurance policies.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rachel May from Cool Future Technologies
Scoop.it!

The Revolution Will Be Printed

The Revolution Will Be Printed | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it
Digital fabrication will change the course of the future

 

"Digital fabrication will allow individuals to design and produce tangible objects on demand, wherever and whenever they need them."

 

Three-dimensional printers are already old hat to the professor. "The revolution," he writes, "is ... the ability to turn data into things and things into data. ... Scientists in a number of labs (including mine) are now working on the real thing, developing processes that can place individual atoms and molecules into any structure they want.

 

Unlike 3-D printers today, these will be able to build complete functional systems at once, with no need for parts to be assembled. The aim is to not only to produce parts for a drone, for example, but build a complete vehicle that can fly straight out of the printer. ... 


Via Sepp Hasslberger
Rachel May's insight:

3. 3D Printing

 

Even in relative the infancy of 3D printing, there are those seeking to extend this technology to deliver greater benefits. This article discusses the extensions of 3D printing in to areas not first imagined such as the printing of food. It then extends from 3D printing to assembling also. Virtually producing fully functioning cars from atoms and making them ready to drive 'hot' off the printer. This provides endless opportunities for all to be shopping and purchasing without doing either - just printing and using. No shipping costs - no middle man. 

 

To be quite informal about it, MIND = BLOWN!

 

 

more...
Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, March 18, 2013 2:16 PM

3-D printing is old hat. Digital manufacturing or control of manufacturing at the level of atoms is already being worked on. Think Star Trek replicator ...

 

This has the capacity to change just about everything, including how we work, play, live, create and surprise ourselves...

John Zulaikha's curator insight, March 18, 2013 5:55 PM

forget 3-D printers, controlling atoms to form structures creates complete models that work out of the box.

Genevieve Free's curator insight, March 19, 2013 11:24 PM

3-D printers the future of fabrication and assembly

Scooped by Rachel May
Scoop.it!

Quantum Dots and Nanoparticles | Exploring the Nanoworld

Quantum Dots and Nanoparticles | Exploring the Nanoworld | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it
University of Wisconsin Materials Research Science and Engineering Center Interdisciplinary Education Group
Rachel May's insight:

4. Healthcare

 

Postulating that nanotechnology in healthcare may lead to improvement in the treatment of cancer by decreasing unnecessary contact with healthy cells in comparison to current chemotherapy methods that also destroy these cells.

 

Nanoparticles are impacting many areas of modern life - both expected, and the unexpected (addition to our food). This is a very positive and seemingly realistic application of this technology.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rachel May from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Coming to a Clinic Near You: Computers that Diagnose and Treat Patients

Coming to a Clinic Near You: Computers that Diagnose and Treat Patients | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it

Can computers diagnose patients as well as doctors? Read on to see how tech can help diagnose and treat patients at a lower cost.

 

New research out of Indiana University suggests “machine learning” — the technology behind voice recognition systems, self-driving cars to name a few — could help cut healthcare costs by more than 50 percent and improve patient outcomes by nearly 50 percent.

 

Researchers in the study were able to successfully get computers to “think like a doctor” by using computer models to simulate numerous alternative treatment paths in the future, in addition to continuously planning treatments as new information surfaced.

 

The studies were not disease-specific, indicating the tech could work for any diagnosis or disorder when relevant information is imputed.

 

“We’re using modern computational approaches to learn from clinical data and develop complex plans through the simulation of numerous, alternative sequential decision paths,” said Casey Bennett, a researcher involved in the study. “The framework here easily outperforms the current treatment-as-usual, case-rate/fee-for-service models of health care.”


Via nrip
Rachel May's insight:
4. Healthcare

 

Research is being conducted in to the plausibility of machines being able to 'think like a doctor' to combat three main primary health care issues:

Rising healthcare costsQuality of careA lag time of 13-17 years between research and practice in clinical care

 

Where healthcare and improved patient outcomes and reduced costs meet there are many hospital boards rubbing their hands with glee! Algorithms are already used in Clinical Decision Support Systems to assist multidisciplinary clinical staff in triage and this machine is an extension of that. It will be interesting to see the Australian Medical Association's response to this technology should it ever be introduced with any kind of reduction of medical FTE.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rachel May from GeekGasm
Scoop.it!

Google Glasses And 7 Other Wearable Tech Inventions That Could Change Your Life | The Creators Project

Google Glasses And 7 Other Wearable Tech Inventions That Could Change Your Life | The Creators Project | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it
The products that could become the smartphones of tomorrow.

Via Sue Hickton
Rachel May's insight:

5.Wearable technology

 

As consumers demand products get smaller and smaller as well as faster and more intuitive, the next logical step from holding a device is wearing it. This article uncovers wearable technology in various stages of progress and provides a picture for the uses in the future. Each of these technologies has multiple uses, but in my humble opinion, it's the ones that are the most aesthetically pleasing that will be flying off the shelves.

more...
Yannah Catherin's curator insight, March 22, 2013 9:41 AM

Computers used to be so big to fill a single room-and became smaller and smaller ever since.

The next logical step in the development of Computers is  moving from holding a device to wearing a device.

From now on you won't be able to forget them, as they just become a part of you

 

Rescooped by Rachel May from Artificial Intelligence
Scoop.it!

Artificial Intelligence (AI) Means More Than Just Neat Gadgets

Artificial Intelligence (AI) Means More Than Just Neat Gadgets | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it
Artificial Intelligence (AI) Means More Than Just Neat Gadgets - It Could Mean ...
Huffington Post UK (blog)
Despite a number of false dawns, artificial intelligence (AI) is finally beginning to deliver on some of its early promise.

Via RomanGodzich
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel May
Scoop.it!

Ray Kurzweil Plans to Create a Mind at Google—and Have It Serve You | MIT Technology Review

Ray Kurzweil Plans to Create a Mind at Google—and Have It Serve You | MIT Technology Review | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it
The technologist speaks about an ambitious plan to build a powerful artificial intelligence.
Rachel May's insight:

1. Artificial Intelligence

 

Futurist and Google employee, Ray Kurzweil, discusses his plans to build artificial intelligence. With the advancement of this technology to the point of true artificial intelligence, the profit possibilities for Google and the uses for mankind are seemingly endless. However, the reality of the Terminator movies may also be fast approaching!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rachel May from Artificial Intelligence
Scoop.it!

Scientists Have Built an Internet for Robots

Scientists Have Built an Internet for Robots | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it
Scientists in Europe have put together a "standardised knowledge base for robots," through which robots can exchange information with other robots using cloud computing.

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET, RomanGodzich
Rachel May's insight:

1. Artificial Intelligence / 2. Cloud Computing

 

A 'standardised knowledge base for robots' has already been developed, allowing robots to share information through cloud computing. This alleviates any issues of individual robots needing to 'learn' as any 'lessons' are accessible through the cloud. This also results in a decreased need for internal memory which means the physical robot would require less power etc.

This raises questions for me about these 'lessons' and the human that is 'teaching' this robot. Who says that the way I want my shirt folded is the way my neighbour wants theirs folded? Obviously this is a very small scale, but when you think about the intentions of potential teachers, does this open up a wide range of different network security or personal security issues? Is there a third party approving new 'lessons', and how would this be managed?

more...
supdude's comment, March 19, 2013 9:47 PM
Artificial Intelligence has been created enabling other Artificial Intelligence (such as robots) to communicate wireless through a cloud network. They are even able to access other information (on the internet for example) to use to "communicate" with the other Artificial Intelligence.
Scooped by Rachel May
Scoop.it!

What is 3D Printing? | MakerBlog

What is 3D Printing? | MakerBlog | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it
Rachel May's insight:

3. 3D Prining

 

3D printing is rapidly changing the landscape of manufacturing, designing and inventing in general, allowing designers more control over the process and supply of products. This article also explains the 3D printing process.

 

This is a technology that is already beginning to pervade our society and will only continue to make a difference in the end-to-end designing and  manufacturing process where it will change dramatically from what we have known it to be in our lifetime. Presumably, with the increase in prevalence and the reduction in production costs for this technology, the machines and materials themselves will become more and more affordable. However, with a gun already being 3D printed, will there be any control over ownership of machines, or registers of what is printed?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel May
Scoop.it!

What Happens in an Internet Minute?

What Happens in an Internet Minute? | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it
Do you know what happens in one minute on the Internet? In just one minute, more than 204 million emails are sent. Amazon rings up about $83,000 in sales. Around 20 million photos are viewed and 3,000 ...
Rachel May's insight:

An interesting pictograph examining current internet user behaviour. Amongst other indicators, an indicator of future behaviour can be gained by looking at current behaviour.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel May
Scoop.it!

Peter Diamandis: Abundance is our future | Video on TED.com

Onstage at TED2012, Peter Diamandis makes a case for optimism -- that we'll invent, innovate and create ways to solve the challenges that loom over us. "I’m not saying we don’t have our set of problems; we surely do.
Rachel May's insight:

A positive look at the present moment, man-kinds accomplishments, and the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel May
Scoop.it!

Your Breath May Hold The Key To Diagnosing Cancer

Your Breath May Hold The Key To Diagnosing Cancer | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it
Researchers used a new nano-material that was up to 90 percent successful in identifying patients with stomach cancers from their breath alone.
Rachel May's insight:

4. Healthcare

 

Researchers have conducted clinical trials that have indicated a 90% success rate in identifying through the use of nanotechnology testing the breath, which patients had stomach cancer. The technology is similar to the capabilities of dogs which have been known to detect types of cancers through their greater sense of smell.

 

This technology seems to be a long time coming, as it has been widely known for a time that dogs have been able to detect cancers. Although more trials are needed, the non-invasiveness of this procedure compared to the alternative may relieve some anxiety for otherwise concerned patients. I'm sure the research is already being done as to how testing can continue to be extended to other types of cancers.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rachel May from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Survey: 76% of Patients Would Choose Telehealth Over Human Contact

Survey: 76% of Patients Would Choose Telehealth Over Human Contact | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it

76% of patients would choose telehealth over human contact according to recent survey that highlights the increased trust in telehealth by consumers.

 

Consumer trust in telehealth is growing with 76% of patients choosing access to care over human interaction with their care provider according to a recent survey

 


Via nrip
Rachel May's insight:

4. Healthcare

 

Another interesting pictograph on patient preferences in healthcare, indicating that technology is not only becoming more prevalent in our healthcare, but more prevalent in our expectations and preferences of healthcare.

more...
Lou Fetscher's comment, March 11, 2013 8:14 PM
Seems to Parallel what is going on with education as well. On line programs vs on campus programs.
Leonard Kish's curator insight, July 20, 2013 10:53 AM

Are you ready for this providers? Who's going to prepare docs for this new future? I hope med and nursing schools are paying attention.

Mighty Casey's curator insight, July 22, 2013 12:46 PM

And I'm one of them.

Rescooped by Rachel May from CAS 383: Culture and Technology
Scoop.it!

An Interactive Infographic Maps The Future Of Emerging Technology

An Interactive Infographic Maps The Future Of Emerging Technology | Information Technology - Current and Emerging Trends | Scoop.it

When will you get your robot butler? When will we first set foot on Mars? These and countless other questions about the future are answered in this amazing chart of where technology is headed in the next 30 years.

 

Can speculation about the future of technology serve as a measuring stick for what we create today? That's the idea behind Envisioning Technology's massive infographic, which maps the future of emerging technologies on a loose timeline between now and 2040.


Via Danielle Klaus, John Shank
Rachel May's insight:

A time mapping of current and emerging technologies for the next 30 years including health care advancements such as self healing materials, organ printing and synthetic blood in the next couple of years. It is interesting to think about which ones we will be able to tick off as accurate and which ones will end up seeming as far fetched as all of us on hoverboards in 2012 (thinking 'Back to the Future').

more...
No comment yet.