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Rescooped by Peter (PJ) Fulcher-Meredith from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Story Listening: The Hidden Power of This Forgotten Leadership Skill

Story Listening: The Hidden Power of This Forgotten Leadership Skill | Curious thinking | Scoop.it
It may be the most underutilized and underdeveloped leadership skill you will find in entrepreneurs. And it may be your most important link to success.

Via Karen Dietz
Peter (PJ) Fulcher-Meredith's insight:

I've talked before about the critical importance of story listening for great leadership. This article talks about it too, but also discusses:

organizational conversationsauthentic listeningand gives us 8 ways to be when receiving feedback (and communicating in general)

 

As the author, Marcel Schwantes, says at the end, "As you move forward, embrace relating to others with more curiosity and intent about those you serve."  Love that!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, March 10, 2016 9:08 AM

I've talked before about the critical importance of story listening for great leadership. This article talks about it too, but also discusses:

organizational conversationsauthentic listeningand gives us 8 ways to be when receiving feedback (and communicating in general)

 

As the author, Marcel Schwantes, says at the end, "As you move forward, embrace relating to others with more curiosity and intent about those you serve."  Love that!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

Roger Francis's curator insight, March 11, 2016 4:39 AM

I've talked before about the critical importance of story listening for great leadership. This article talks about it too, but also discusses:

organizational conversationsauthentic listeningand gives us 8 ways to be when receiving feedback (and communicating in general)

 

As the author, Marcel Schwantes, says at the end, "As you move forward, embrace relating to others with more curiosity and intent about those you serve."  Love that!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

Graham Clark's curator insight, March 11, 2016 7:12 AM

I've talked before about the critical importance of story listening for great leadership. This article talks about it too, but also discusses:

organizational conversationsauthentic listeningand gives us 8 ways to be when receiving feedback (and communicating in general)

 

As the author, Marcel Schwantes, says at the end, "As you move forward, embrace relating to others with more curiosity and intent about those you serve."  Love that!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

Rescooped by Peter (PJ) Fulcher-Meredith from Moral Leadership
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Why Isn’t ‘Servant Leadership’ More Prevalent? — HBS Working Knowledge

Why Isn’t ‘Servant Leadership’ More Prevalent? — HBS Working Knowledge | Curious thinking | Scoop.it
With servant leadership, a leader's primary role is to serve employees. Everyone from Lao-Tzu to Max De Pree thinks this a wonderful model. Why then, asks Professor Jim Heskett , is this style so rare among CEOs?

Via Anthony Howard
Peter (PJ) Fulcher-Meredith's insight:

Thanks to Anthony Howard for finding this one.  Over the years I have had the fortune to have a number of 'servant leaders' as clients. One common challnege they all faced, no matter how successful they were was the ire of other leaders who weren't prepared to acknowledge the value of 'servant leadership' in a number of cases they even said to me, they thought so and so was a 'bit weak' or a 'push over'.  Being a servant leaders requires you to be present and attentive to all that is happening or about to happen around you.  You don't have to be 'soft' to care, you just have to be prepared to put yourself in the other person's shoes from time to time and attempt to see a situation from the other point of view before you perhaps disagree. Otherwise it is 'status leadership' which can lead to tyranny. You have to work at 'servant leadership' every moment of every day but the rewards keep on giving.  It is worth it.  Great article.

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Anthony Howard's curator insight, May 9, 2013 7:29 PM

Great question Jim.

This article highlights the responsibility of leaders to create en environment in which people can flourish. If staff can grow and develop at work they cannot fail to be more engaged and more productive (in every sense of the word, not just to the bottom line).

Is the scarcity of servant leaders due to the paucity of role models? Or perhaps because of short term self interested thinking? Is it perhaps seen as a sign of weakness.

I don't think we need to dwell on why it is lacking, but rather find ways to foster servant leadership. Putting myself in the other's shoes is a good start. Plus remembering that what my business card says in my title is only passing, and not who I really am. Let's look to the humanity of our colleagues, not to their economic output.

Rescooped by Peter (PJ) Fulcher-Meredith from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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The 3 E’s of Re-tellable Leadership Stories

The 3 E’s of Re-tellable Leadership Stories | Curious thinking | Scoop.it

There are three kinds of people, said the sign on the wall of my dad’s coaching office:

Those that make things happen, those that watch things happen, and those that don’t know what the heck happened.


Via Karen Dietz
Peter (PJ) Fulcher-Meredith's insight:

As Karen said a different way of capturing and curating your business stories.  Anything that helps leaders to categorise and re-use and re-purpose stories the better. Make it easier and leaders will use stories more and more to engage their people. Nice one.

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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, November 30, 2013 9:54 PM

As assistant principals, we have to address groups of students, faculty, parents, colleagues. We have to deal with problems of individual students, staff members, and even parents. Many of us are asked to address banquets and awards assemblies. This article and the links to details it provides helps even those who think they don't HAVE stories or don't know how to develop them.

JoanneMorris's curator insight, December 1, 2013 1:29 PM

This applies to Educational Leadership too, of course.

Karen Dietz's comment, December 2, 2013 2:03 PM
Excellent points Nancy!