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Web 2.0 Chronic Disease Self-Management for Older Adults: A Systematic Review

Web 2.0 Chronic Disease Self-Management for Older Adults: A Systematic Review | Curator's Daily | Scoop.it
Web 2.0 Chronic Disease Self-Management for Older Adults: A Systematic Review

 

Participatory Web 2.0 interventions promote collaboration to support chronic disease self-management. Growth in Web 2.0 interventions has led to the emergence of e-patient communication tools that enable older adults to (1) locate and share disease management information and (2) receive interactive healthcare advice. The evolution of older e-patients contributing to Web 2.0 health and medical forums has led to greater opportunities for achieving better chronic disease outcomes. To date, there are no review articles investigating the planning, implementation, and evaluation of Web 2.0 chronic disease self-management interventions for older adults.


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Rescooped by Catherine Yanda from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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Universities as Engines of Regional Economic Development | SAGE Connection

Universities as Engines of Regional Economic Development | SAGE Connection | Curator's Daily | Scoop.it

Professor David Audretsch is a Distinguished Professor and Ameritech Chair of Economic Development at Indiana University, where he also serves as Director of the Institute for Development Strategies.  Audretsch’s research has focused on the links between entrepreneurship, government policy, innovation, economic development and global competitiveness. His research has been published in over one hundred scholarly articles in the leading academic journals.

 

With co-authors Dennis P. Leyden and Albert N. Link, Audretsch recently published an article in the journal Economic Development Quarterly, titled “Regional Appropriation of University-Based Knowledge and Technology for Economic Development.

 

”In this article, he argued that knowledge does not fall like manna from heaven, but rather it is systematically transmitted through research that involves universities. We thought his argument was fascinating, and thought you might too, so we asked him to expound a bit on these thoughts. The following is his response.

 

Click headline to read the interview--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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