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Let's map a small part of the universe that deals with teaching and learning about curation
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Content Curation: The Art and Science of Spotting Awesome

Content Curation: The Art and Science of Spotting Awesome | CurationEd | Scoop.it
Content curation - the process of finding, organizing, and  sharing topical, relevant content for your audience that supports your nonprofit's engagement or campaign goals (or your professional learning) begins with "Spotting the Awesome."   I love that phrase coined by my frie
Terry Elliott's insight:

"Spotting the awesome" makes it seem like you are a birder in the wild looking for that rara avis that is worth all the effort.  A real course-in-a-box style blog post.

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Content Discovery Tools by Robin Good | ZEEF

Content Discovery Tools by Robin Good | ZEEF | CurationEd | Scoop.it
Where do you find new valuable content for your area of interest? Here a few selected tools that can help you out.

Terry Elliott's insight:

I love how this has a such a Web 1.0 start page simplicity to it.  Robin Good has given anyone a roadmap for the deep dive that research has become.  This page acts as a prefilter for almost any topic you might be interested.  He has this also as a monstrous mindmap with a bit different emphasis elsewhere, but I am less intimidated by this one.  This is now my first stop in the morning.  Thanks, Robin

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7 smart techniques for content curation | Socialbrite

RT @socialbrite: And here's Beth @Kanter on 7 smart techniques for content curation: http://t.co/oPyeHKAn
#CommBuild #curation
Shaz J's insight:

Specifically interesting for me with an interesting in non-profits and development. Need to remember to make the link to the purpose of the action!

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SMOOC's curator insight, February 18, 4:33 PM

Great Techniques for content creation

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Teaching Kids to Curate Content Collections [ACTIVITY] - The Tempered Radical

Teaching Kids to Curate Content Collections [ACTIVITY] - The Tempered Radical | CurationEd | Scoop.it
While there are a ton of essential skills that today's students need in order to succeed in tomorrow's world, learning to efficiently manage -- and to evaluate the reliability of -- the information that they stumble across online HAS to...
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Paula Silva's curator insight, December 15, 2012 1:40 PM

An interesting example of using tools for educational purposes. Scoop.it can be used to:

1- teach kids to search;  2- manage information, evaluate sources and build collections and 3- allow kids to publish content on topics that are  part of the curriculum. 

 

Image source: http://blog.emints.org/?p=771

CoordenadorTic's curator insight, December 16, 2012 6:40 AM

"An interesting example of using tools for educational purposes. Scoop.it can be used to:1- teach kids to search;  2- manage information, evaluate sources and build collections and 3- allow kids to publish content on topics that are  part of the curriculum." via @Paula Silva

Heiko Idensen's comment, December 17, 2012 3:08 AM
#curation as an educational process is a very interesting method in #elearning
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Curation Platforms | Comparison tables - SocialCompare

Curation Platforms | Comparison tables - SocialCompare | CurationEd | Scoop.it

Big ol' list of curation  tools

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Content Curation for Personal Learning and Sharing | Flexibility ...

Content Curation for Personal Learning and Sharing | Flexibility ... | CurationEd | Scoop.it

See on Scoop.it – Curation in Higher Education This was the meme I, @josemota, and @etutoria prepared for The PLE Conference 2012 (1). Memes of this sort are supposed to be fun – that's what we tried to achieve through ... Memes are pretty popular at the moment so this is just to bring a smile to our faces. :-)

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Curation is sharing with discernment

Curation is sharing with discernment | CurationEd | Scoop.it

 

I think Paula Silva summed it up pretty well:

 

One of the important elements of the tripartite model of content curation is sharing. It assumes the value which is determined by the purpose and the objectives set by the topic curator(s). Sharing may, for example, follow a marketing strategy or may be moved by the spontaneity of the curator (or the user/follower). With regard to Personal Knowledge Management (PKM), Harold Jarche highlights a significant aspect to guide sharing: discernment, i.e., when sharing you must be aware of the following aspects: when, with whom and how. Sharing can be done openly, through a blog, or it can be targeted to a particular community or network. Like PKM, when you are curating, a discerning sharing also contributes to build trust. If a curator sets himself as a reliable node for a community or network, his intervention will have a greater value and impact.

 

Image credit:Harold Jarche

 http://www.jarche.com/2012/08/sharing-with-discernment/


Via Paula Silva
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Terry Elliott's comment, October 5, 2012 11:32 AM
I really am drawn by the graphic and the abstraction, discernment, is full of resonants, aftertones, undertones, and tones yet to be heard but imminent. Discernment changes daily. I think this is a reminder that we need to approach curation with a 'prayer' of focus. For example, in curation-ed I need to invoke a hope to find words, minds, and text that will help us all seek/filter/create sense/discern/and share.
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Why a Fancy Art Museum Is Curating a Collection of Cat Videos

Why a Fancy Art Museum Is Curating a Collection of Cat Videos | CurationEd | Scoop.it
Can the Internet's fervor for felines translate to in-person interactions?

 

Proof that curation doesn't have to be too serious, but can still be done well. There is always a niche - have hope!

 

That, and I am partial to cats :P

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Terry Elliott's comment, September 2, 2012 8:16 PM
This is really evocative--go from the digital back to the analog. And the crowd they are expecting, 5000, indicates they just might have found that the arrow of social connection, unlike the arrow of time, doesgo both ways.

Thanks for this. I had dismissed it when my daughter mentioned this over a Saturday meal, but now I see its larger significnce.
Shaz J's comment, September 3, 2012 3:26 AM
Haha, that's great! I take that as a sign of effectiveness.

I think this is important because cat videos have been such a booming internet phenomenon and just as you say, bringing it from the digital to the physical, _through curation_. It feels a bit like the the traditional sense of curation, as in a museum, just with internet material.

(Note: Just for shits and giggles, this one actually won something, and it's pretty good! http://bit.ly/Hp1d9K)
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The RSS NewsMaster

The RSS NewsMaster | CurationEd | Scoop.it
The NewsMaster: A New Emergent Socio-Professional Role In the beginning was Yahoo and AltaVista. Then Google came...

 

Those are the words that mark the post that anyone who is interested in curation needs to read and build upon.  I return to Robin Good's words as a compass to my curatorial life. I hope he continues to revise them as he progresses down his own curatorial road.

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Websites and Apps for Teaching Digital Writing

Websites and Apps for Teaching Digital Writing | CurationEd | Scoop.it

I find this type of curation more and more useful. 

 

I also like the verb choice of _crafting_ collaborative texts, etc.. I think that highlights the agency and reflection that I've found as a good input and ouput of curative practice.

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Shaz J's comment, August 23, 2012 5:53 PM
EDIT: "curative" ?
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Web Tools for Teachers by Type - LiveBinder

Web 2.0 tools organized by type/task....

 

I've never seen this kind of software before, and I really like how it works as a visual tool. It does however impose a categorical system, if I understand correctly.

 

Notice the "Curation Tools" Tab. Not all seem worth investigating to me, but then a lot of them seem to be about bookmark management and social bookmarking.

 

Does anybody have experience or want to try BagtheWeb?


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CurationSoft Content Curation Software

CurationSoft Content Curation Software | CurationEd | Scoop.it

"Drag and drop curation made easy saving you time and money".

 

I feel like this is cheating a bit, by forcing you to use their platform. I feel curation is partly born out of the fluidity of the internet. 

 

Any thoughts?

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Terry Elliott's comment, August 8, 2012 7:09 AM
Have you created anything with this yet? Wanna create something over a very narrow topic as a fast prototype of the tool? Got an EdDev topic you interested in co-curating?
Terry Elliott's comment, August 8, 2012 7:10 AM
Further...we could do a blitz curation. Set the timer and work on it for 30 minutes then back off and evaluate the tool's effectiveness.
Shaz J's comment, August 12, 2012 7:53 AM
I like the idea of a blitz curation, using it for 30 min or something. However having just clicked through to try to download this software, the free version only searches Google Blogs. I am not impressed.
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Understanding the Value of Curation for Education: Nancy White

Understanding the Value of Curation for Education: Nancy White | CurationEd | Scoop.it

Robin Good: What does curation mean from an educational viewpoint? And what is the key difference between "collecting" and "curating".

Nancy White (@NancyW), a 21st Century Learning & Innovation Specialist and the author of Innovations in Education blog, has written an excellent article, dissecting the key characterizing traits of curation, as a valuable resource to create and share knowledge. 

 

She truly distills some key traits of curation in a way that is clear and comprehensible to anyone.

 

She writes: "The first thing I realized is that in order to have value-added benefits to curating information, the collector needs to move beyond just classifying the objects under a certain theme to deeper thinking through a) synthesis and b) evaluation of the collected items.

 

How are they connected?"

 

Excellent definition. 

 

And then she also frames perfectly the relevance of "context" for any meaningful curation project by writing: "I believe when we curate, organization moves beyond thematic to contextual – as we start to build knowledge and understanding with each new resource that we curate.

 

Themes have a common unifying element – but don’t necessarily explain the “why.”

 

Theme supports a central idea – Context allows the learner to determine why that idea (or in this case, resource) is important.

 

So, as collecting progresses into curating, context becomes essential to determine what to keep, and what to discard."

 

But there's a lot more insight distilled in this article as Nancy captures with elegance the difference between collecting for a personal interest and curating for a specific audience. 

 

She finally steals my full endorsement for this article by discretely inquirying how great a value it would be to allow students to "curate" the domains of interest they need to master.

 

Excellent. Highly recommended. 9/10

 

Full article: http://d20innovation.d20blogs.org/2012/07/07/understanding-content-curation/ ;

 

 

[update] informatics: 

http://d20innovation.d20blogs.org/2012/07/07/understanding-content-curation

 

 

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/informatics-technology-in-education/p/2204173710/students-as-curators-of-their-learning-topics ;

[/update]


Via Robin Good, Gust MEES, Theresa Giakoumatou, Informatics, João Greno Brogueira
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Beth Kanter's comment, July 8, 2012 1:22 PM
I especially like how she used the Bloom's Taxonomy and related that to curation.
Stalder Angèle's comment, August 1, 2012 3:56 AM
Thank you for this scoop!
Shaz J's comment, August 5, 2012 10:39 AM
Thanks for this!
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Your Brain on Nature: Forest Bathing and Reduced Stress

Your Brain on Nature: Forest Bathing and Reduced Stress | CurationEd | Scoop.it
Studies show shinrin-yoku, also known as forest bathing or time spent in green spaces, can reduce the stress hormone cortisol and increase your immune defense system.
Terry Elliott's insight:

What does work like this suggest about digital spaces?  My mom always kicked me out of the house when I had been playing inside too much.  Do we need to strongly suggest that folks get out and play?  Is there any way to re-create the effect of nature in digital spaces?  Screensavers that engage after so many minutes with high rez pics of nature?  Or in the act of doing 'learning walks', of going outside and getting our dose of nature and recording that walk, that we gain even more good.  I don't know, but maybe we should all have that voice in your head that says, "Get down. Get out and play." 

 

BTW, my mother was a whiz at going outside and playing with us:  marbles, baseball, basketball, kites, mumbledypeg (a freaking knife game and she was scary good).  The purest athlete I have ever known.

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Product Review: Email Marketing with MailChimp ...

Product Review: Email Marketing with MailChimp ... | CurationEd | Scoop.it
MailChimp is a Web-based email marketing service that comes with a suite of tools. If you're considering using it, read this in-depth MailChimp review.
Terry Elliott's insight:

MailChimp now works with Scoop.It so that you can reach a newsletter audience as well as you online curated audience.  It is a breeze to use and free.

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As We May Think: A 1945 Essay on Information Overload, “Curation,” and Open-Access Science

As We May Think: A 1945 Essay on Information Overload, “Curation,” and Open-Access Science | CurationEd | Scoop.it
Shaz J's insight:

Curation ain't new, and neither is this post. But I really liked this little diagram. 

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Shaz J's comment, May 3, 2013 3:26 AM
Interesting that you link it to the academic year, despite the P2PU course being in the summer last year. Is it because of a holiday, or because your curation is linked to academia?
Terry Elliott's comment, May 3, 2013 5:56 AM
What I meant was that as my teaching demands taper off, my curation begins again. I think by winding up I meant "gearing up".
Shaz J's comment, May 4, 2013 3:57 AM
Then looking forward to it!
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Introducing The Curator’s Code: A Standard for Honoring Attribution of Discovery Across the Web

Introducing The Curator’s Code: A Standard for Honoring Attribution of Discovery Across the Web | CurationEd | Scoop.it

I am struck by Steven Johnson remix quote, "Chance favors the connected mind."  And I admire Popova's attempt to corral the idea of 'curation' into a manifesto.

 

Again, the humble bookmarklet is proving to be the catalyst for bringing together the bone, muscle, and sinew of the Internet in ways that continually surprise me.  I am not sure whether there needs to be a distinction between the attribution of direct and indirect discovery for the user of the link.  How much does knowing the connection to the original curator was either of these ?  I am sure there is a good answer to this, but I am not sure what it is. 

 

Any way you look at it, the 'actionable code of ethics' that this represents is as handy as a pocket knife in a mailroom.

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VanessaVaile's curator insight, June 18, 10:56 AM

Because many #adjunct activist & #socialmedia sharers should be more attentive to attribution…more annotations & fewer links just thrown like spaghetti on the wall (usually Facebook) to see what sticks would be another plus

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Digital Curation: Have a backup plan!

Digital Curation: Have a backup plan! | CurationEd | Scoop.it

Using a curation tool - Storify - failed because of a glitch in the cloud. No back up plan meant students collectively evaluated alternatives. 

Good story, with a public GoogleDoc to see the results too. 

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When Educators Become Curators - keynote slides #moothr12

Slides from my virtual keynote at the Croatian MoodleMoot, June 2012.

 

Good stuff, good overview of digital curation, tools,etc and ways that Moodle can be used as a mixing panel. Useful for teachers who may currently be using Moodle as a teacher centred storage repository rather than harnessing its collaborative features. 

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Shaz J's comment, September 7, 2012 7:02 PM
Thank you for this clear overview.

Major bonus points in my book for including the Dilbert cartoon. I get a daily feed - must have missed this gem! :D
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What Is Content Curation: My Collection of the Best Definitions « ALLWEBTUTS

What Is Content Curation: My Collection of the Best Definitions « ALLWEBTUTS | CurationEd | Scoop.it

Robin Good tackles the thorny issue of definition.  How do we define content curation and what are the implications behind those definitions.  I would think that most definitions arise from a philosophical point of view that shapes what is defined.  Anyone interested in addressing this issue further perhaps in Google + Hangout or an asynchronous document like a hackpad or a Google doc?

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Is Content Curation Just Organized Theft?

Under that provocative title, Justin P Lambert actually does a great favor to Curators by outlining a key point between plagiarism, social sharing and curation.

 

While blog plagiarism has been as old as blog platforms - Justin shares his own story - he defines the clear line that exists between:

1. blog users who copy/paste entire articles 

2. social media users who share randomly without having their "audience’s needs or desires in mind"

3. curators who - he says - "put their audience first"

 

Curation done right "involves figuring out what your audience wants and needs to know about and then sifting through the overwhelming amount of information out there to hand-pick specific items that you know they will benefit from." This is a pretty good definition of Curation in my opinion and one of its direct consequences is that Curation works better in a topic-centric model.

 

Defining a topic and making your editorial line clear is a great first step to develop an audience with their interests in mind.


Via Guillaume Decugis
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Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's comment, August 31, 2012 2:52 PM
Title is provocative, cintent of the blog page less so.
Curation we did it science before internet, reading current contents for instance to keep abreast of published literature but it was impossible to access grey literature (reports, press releases; patents...) and not so easy to archive and find xerocopies.
Tools like scoop it should be a tremendous progress for specific audiences, if curators are doing the human job on a day to day basis. Theyr are more like dedicated journalists of special topics and those are not considered as thieves.
Guillaume Decugis's comment, August 31, 2012 2:54 PM
Thanks Gilbert for the comment. I of course agree (but I think Justin too: he actually defended the value curators bring and listed Scoop.it in the tools he loves :-). And you're right to point out Curation is an old habit which is just changing with technology and new platforms like ours. Thanks for the praise on Scoop.it!
Shaz J's comment, September 2, 2012 3:35 AM
I like the idea of the "set it and forget it" value of Scoop.it. But then that is definitely a dimension of the tool that one would have to consider - is that what you want from your curation? Does that match your audience?
I find this to be a very important point, especially for me personally. Thank you.
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Content Curation & Fair Use: 5 Rules to being an Ethical Content Curator - Content Curation Marketing

Content Curation & Fair Use: 5 Rules to being an Ethical Content Curator - Content Curation Marketing | CurationEd | Scoop.it

Content Curation & Fair Use: 5 Rules to being an Ethical Content Curator (RT @Curate_Content: Content Curation & Fair Use: 5 Rules to being an Ethical Content Curator
- Content Curation Marketi...)...   Some quick ideas about ethical content curation which can form a handy guide. What about legal considerations of curating content?

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Shaz J's comment, September 2, 2012 3:33 AM
Thanks for this. I'm not sure what your "SEO" is, but sounds good.
Terry Elliott's comment, September 2, 2012 8:01 PM
SEO=search engine optimization.

I think that this article argues that contextualization is all--at least ethically. There needs to be a reason to grab the article and that reason needs to relate to the purpose and audience you are addressing in your curatorial activity. Agree.
Shaz J's comment, September 3, 2012 3:21 AM
More and more I see these arguments that curation needs context and audience. Yes, absolutely.
Yet there seems to be a bit less of a discussion about what and how to choose your audience, no?
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Curators Create The Metadata Needed To Enable Our Emerging Collective Intelligence

I am more and more of the opinion that curators are the heart of the Web's immune system.  Curators are the phages who couple and de-couple the great trains of information in the endless railyards of the Internet.  Like teachers, these folk have a thankless job that never ends.  Consider the lowly Wikipedia gnome as one example of these curating phages selecting out the good so that it can become adopted and adapted by others.  How do curators do this?  Idiosyncratically, but with an eye ever towards increasing signal and reducing noise.  If you will pardon another comparison, they are the transistors of the information conduit, a gate that lets one thing in and not another.  Maxwell's demons, that's what curators are.







Robin Good: Participatory culture writer and book author Henry Jenkins interviews cyberculture pioneer Howard Rheingold (Net Smart, 2012) by asking him to explain some of the concepts that have helped him become a paladin of the  and "new literacies" so essential for survival in the always-on information-world we live in today.

 

This is part three of a long and in-depth interview (Part 2, Part 1) covering key concepts and ideas as the value of "community" and "networks", the architecture of participation, affinity working spaces, and curation.

Here is a short excerpt of Howard response to a question about curation and its value as both a “fundamental building block” of networked communities and as an important form of participation:

 

Howard Rheingold: "...at the fundamental level, curation depends on individuals making mindful and informed decisions in a publicly detectable way.

 

Certainly just clicking on a link, “liking” or “plussing” an item online, adding a tag to a photograph is a lightweight element that can be aggregated in valuable ways (ask Facebook).

 

But the kind of curation that is already mining the mountains of Internet ore for useful and trustworthy nuggets of knowledge, and the kind that will come in the future, has a strong literacy element.

 

Curators don’t just add good-looking resources to lists, or add their vote through a link or like, they summarize and contextualize in their own words, explicitly explain why the resource is worthy of attention, choose relevant excerpts, tag thoughtfully, group resources and clearly describe the grouping criteria."

 

In other words, "curators" are the ones creating the metadata needed to empower our emerging collective intelligence.

 

Curation Is The Social Choice About What Is Worth Paying Attention To.

 

Good stuff. In-depth. Insightful. 8/10

 

Full interview: http://henryjenkins.org/2012/08/how-did-howard-rheingold-get-so-net-smart-an-interview-part-three.html

 

 


Via Robin Good
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Shaz J's comment, September 3, 2012 3:20 AM
You're welcome :)

It's interesting interesting that you mention POV and stance, as that is not something I had explicitly articulated for myself, but naturally it must be implicitly true. In that sense, it reminds me (again) that curation forces self-reflection in order to present the content better, and that can only be a good thing.
Liz Renshaw's comment, September 8, 2012 9:57 PM
Agree with posts about curation guiding self reflection. This interview in particular is top value and two of my fav people indeed.
SilviaArano's comment, October 3, 2012 2:57 AM
Thanks your for this
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Noam Chomsky – The Purpose of Education

Shaz says,  "Few months old, yes, but I've just come back to it with fresh eyes."

 

"The person who wins the Nobel Prize in biology is not the one who read the most journal articles, it's the one who knew what to look for. Cultivating that capacity to seek what's significant always will answer the question of whether you're on the right track. That's what education is meant to be about."
 

This is rescooped from Shaz's EdDev and the quote above I think is pertinent to curation.  Curation heightens that capacity to seek what's significant.  I think that there is a relatively clear ladder to deep curation like Chomsky advocates.  We move from piles of stuff to cool stuff I like to more particular stuff that I like that others might like to reasoned stuff I like to the pattern language in what I like and ultimate back out to the other stuff that relates in significant ways to what I like.  This is only ladder to Chomsky's ideal, but the digital curation tools out there sure make this a very visible one. 


Via Shaz J, Terry Elliott
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Shaz J's comment, July 26, 2012 4:18 AM
I learnt about this phenomenon from the Curating Our Digital Lives hangout. I blame Joe :P
Terry Elliott's comment, July 26, 2012 5:54 AM
Now I can blame him too because I laughed so hard when I googled it that I think my eyes bled a little bit. Mercy.
KevinHodgson's comment, July 26, 2012 7:10 AM
I really like this line: "Curation heightens that capacity to seek what's significant." That captures a lot of what I am thinking, too.
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10 Rules to Reverse the Email Spiral

10 Rules to Reverse the Email Spiral | CurationEd | Scoop.it

"8. Give these Gifts: EOM NNTR
If your email message can be expressed in half a dozen words, just put it in the subject line, followed by EOM (= End of Message). This saves the recipient having to actually open the message. Ending a note with "No need to respond" or NNTR, is a wonderful act of generosity. Many acronyms confuse as much as help, but these two are golden and deserve wide adoption."

 

While this is not strictly about curation it is concerned with one of the main tenets of curatorial work--more signal, less noise. That is what each of these ten rules is about. The one above is an especially potent one in that it asks that the one who generates more information is duty bouind to do it with the least noise possible--a kind of Occam's razor for information production.

 

If you put EOM in your email, you can reduce it to the status of text message, eliminating the need to use the email textbox. How many times could you use this in a day of emailing? How much less noise would this generate?

 

If you put NNTR at the end of your message text, you are creating a map for reader action. I have always felt that one of the missing elements in most higher level curation is a mapping function or user guidelines or how to navigate the curated world. This has been especially true for larger curations like Robin Good's wonderful yet forbidding mindmaps.

 

My goal will be to use these rules in my curation and to make explicity what rules I am using and why. I will try to do this in the comments section below.

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