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Curation is the next web revolution.
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Must Follow FOMs (Friends of Marty's) Added To Search For Blue Oceans

Must Follow FOMs (Friends of Marty's) Added To Search For Blue Oceans | Curation Revolution | Scoop.it

Must Follow FOMs
Must Follow Friends of Marty's added to +Curagami's FedEx Preso 1st page of Appendix (http://shar.es/1g8FT5 ) includes great curators and friends from Twitter, Scoop.it and G+. Thanks to all for being great FOMs (Friends of Martys).

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50 Great Content Curators - Paper.li's Kelly Hungerford - via @CrowdFunde

50 Great Content Curators - Paper.li's Kelly Hungerford - via @CrowdFunde | Curation Revolution | Scoop.it

50 Great Content Curators
Another #mustfollow if you believe as we do that community will be the next big skirmish line in Internet marketing (read Ouch! 3 Ways To Avoid The Coming Community Shock on Curatti.com http://curatti.com/3-ways-avoid-community-shock/ ). Kelly is a great community manager for one of our favorite get more done with less social media marketing tools - Paper.li.

Just like with Ally, Scoop.it's community Manager Ally Greer and one of our top 50 Content Curators too ( http://www.crowdfunde.com/great-content-curator-ally-greer/ ) there is a lot to learn from in following Kelly.

Watch the variety of topics she discusses on the Paper.li community (linked on the post) and learn how to mesh content to support your online branding via content curation.

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Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter [+Scenttrail Comment]

Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter [+Scenttrail Comment] | Curation Revolution | Scoop.it

I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it.  Sure it’s quick and easy to share with Scoopit.  But it not quick and easy to consume. For me it's all about the econ...

Marty Note (here is comment I wrote on Dr. V's blog)

Appreciate Bryan’s and Joseph’s comment, but I rarely use Scoop.it as a pass through. More than 90% of the time I’m adding “rich snippets” to content I Scoop.

Rich snippets are “blog” posts that fall between Twitter and the 500 to 1,000 words I would write in Scenttrail Marketing. I often create original content ON Scoop.it because whatever I’m writing falls in the crack between Twitter’s micro blog and what I think of as needing to be on my marketing blog.


I was taught NOT to pass through links on Scoop.it early on by the great curator @Robin Good . Robin has well over 1M views on Scoop.it now and his advice along with the patient advice of other great Scoop.it curators has my profile slouching toward 150,000 views.


Bryan is correct that some curators new to Scoop.it haven’t learned the Robin Good lesson yet. I agree it is frustrating to go to a link and not receive anything of value back, to simply need to click on another link. Curators who pass through links won’t scale, so the Darwinian impact will be they will learn to add value or die out.


For my part I always identify my Scoop.it links, probably about half the content I Tweet and about a quarter of my G+ shares. I also routinely share my favorite “Scoopiteers”, great content curators who taught me valuable lessons such as don’t simply pass through links but add “micro blogging” value via rich snippets.


When you follow or consistently share content from a great curator on Scooop.it you begin to understand HOW they shape the subjects they curate. I know, for example, Robin Good is amazing on new tools. Scoop.it anticipated this learning and built in a feature where I can suggest something to Robin.


This is when Scoop.it is at its most crowdsourcing best because I now have an army of curators who know I like to comment on and share content about design or BI or startups and they (other Scoopiteers) keep an eye out for me. There are several reasons Scoop.it is a “get more with less effort” tool and this crowdsourcing my curation is high on the list.


So, sorry you are sad to see Scoop.it links and understand your frustration. You’ve correctly identified the problem too – some curators don’t know how to use the tool yet. I know it is a lot to ask to wait for the Darwinian learning that will take place over generations, but Scoop.it and the web have “generations” that have the half life of a gnat so trust that the richness of the Scoop.it community will win in the end and “the end” won’t take long.


To my fellow Scoop.it curators we owe Bryan and Joseph thanks for reminding us of what Robin Good taught me – add value or your Scoop.it won’t scale. That lessons is applicable to much more than how we use Scoop.it.


Marty

Added to G+ too
https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/TUsNtsAsjWp

 

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Karen Dietz's comment, August 22, 2014 2:07 PM
Right on Marty! I'm re-scooping this as a way to help that learning along about how to really use Scoop.it well and leverage it.
Karen Dietz's curator insight, August 22, 2014 2:25 PM

FYI Folks -- I trust that the reviews I write about the articles I curate help people along in their business storytelling journey. I know that there are many curators out there who do not add reviews/comments to the articles they highlight. 


As a result, Scoop.it and other curation sites are getting a backlash because audience members are tired of getting a link to an article that brings them to Scoop.it, and then requires another click to get to the article. Now I know that is annoying. And there is nothing of value offered between clicks.


Marty's response to the original blog post is right on. Read it along with all the other comments. Truly illuminating.


Other than a rant for me, what's the value of this post to you and business storytelling?


Namely this -- no matter what medium you use -- blogging, curating, digital storytelling -- make sure you are actually adding value for your audience. Expand their knowledge, give them tools, show them how, and offer your excellent insights. The stories you share have to connect to your audience in these ways. Anything else is a waste.


All of these posts and reviews add up to telling your story in a big picture way. So thanks Marty for addressing this issue, and reminding us about principles for quality curation. I've learned a lot from both you and Robin!


Karen Dietz

Bob Connelly's comment, November 23, 2014 7:11 PM
Being new to Scoop.it, I was glad to read this. I wouldn't have thought about this...
Rescooped by Martin (Marty) Smith from Latest Social Media News
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No More Media Gatekeepers: Curators Are All We Need

No More Media Gatekeepers: Curators Are All We Need | Curation Revolution | Scoop.it

Giuseppe Mauriello: This is my “scoop” article for today. I found this article written by Suw Charman-Anderson in November of 2006 from her first professional blog “Strange Attractor”,  now permanently moved to charman-anderson.com.

 

Suw is journalist, social technologist consultant and writer, one of the UK’s social media pioneers. 

Returning to her article... the author describes the scenario of the digital industry at the time (2006), then she raises some interesting  points about the need of content curation and the importance of the curator role. Here are some gems excerpted from it:

“We already have more movies available than any one person can watch; more videos on YouTube; more blogs… more everything. It’s not like we’re starting from a point of scarcity here. And the flood of stuff is going to turn into a rampaging torrent as more people get online and more people get excited by their ability to participate and create.

In the past, the media acted as gatekeepers.

 

They were the ones that went to the movie previews…
They were the ones who got the advance copy of the game…
They were the arbiters of taste, the people in the know, the ones with the connections needed to get at culture before us plebs got at it.

But we don’t need gatekeepers anymore. We don’t need people who stand between us and our stuff, deciding what to tell us about and what to ignore. We don’t need arbiters of taste.

We do, however, still need help. There’s just too much stuff around for us to know what’s out there, to keep up with what’s good, what works for us, what is worth investigation. What we need are curators.

We need people who can gather together the things that are of interest to us, things that fit with our tastes or challenge us in interesting ways, things that enrich our lives and help us enjoy our time rather than waste it on searching.

Curators already exist. Some are people: Bloggers who sift through tonnes of stuff in order to highlight what they like, and who, if you have the same taste as them, can be invaluable to discovering new things to like.


But curation of the web has barely started. Much of what you could call curation that exists today is flawed: too many noisy opinions and not enough capacity to understand what I as an individual want…”

 

I loved this article and title that the author chose for it.

Read the original article here:
http://strange.corante.com/2006/11/08/the-democratisation-of-everything-and-the-curators-who-will-save-our-collective-ass



***** Yes when gatekeepers like editors attempt to continue the market removes that power. Could argue that curation could have saved the newspaper business, but hard to be a curator if you are used to gatekeeping (apparently). Marty


Via Giuseppe Mauriello, Robin Good, Gerrit Bes
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Dasom Ssomy Kim's comment, May 8, 2013 5:52 AM
Content curation, not gatekeeping. people can choose
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Making Process Visible & A Lesson In Web Design: Mario Botta at Bechtler Museum

Making Process Visible & A Lesson In Web Design: Mario Botta at Bechtler Museum | Curation Revolution | Scoop.it

Curator As Hero
I won't copy my linked GPlus (https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/3KLUrc157bC ) post except to say look at the ceiling. I left the top of this image so you can see THE LIGHTS.

I like to do this exercise in department stores too. Looking at the lights gives you a sense for how some a hard working team created the subtle emphasis that now guides your learning and eye. Seeing the lighting always tells you how DRAMATIC the act of curating is too.

NOW ask yourself how you create drama, emphasis, light and shadow on your website? I share more #webdesign thoughts on the linked post. Bravo to the team at the Bechtler Museum in Charlotte, NC for their hard work on the Mario Botta exhibit. KUDOS!

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Rescooped by Martin (Marty) Smith from Curation Revolution
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Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter [Top Curation Revolution Scoop All Time]

Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter [Top Curation Revolution Scoop All Time] | Curation Revolution | Scoop.it

8.21.14
With 1,387 views, more than 2x the next closest Scoop, The debate about Scoop.it links on Twitter is the most viewed and shared Curation Revolution Scoop of all time.

Dr. V

I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it.  Sure it’s quick and easy to share with Scoopit.  But it not quick and easy to consume. For me it's all about the econ...

Marty Note (here is comment I wrote on Dr. V's blog)

Appreciate Bryan’s and Joseph’s comment, but I rarely use Scoop.it as a pass through. More than 90% of the time I’m adding “rich snippets” to content I Scoop.

Rich snippets are “blog” posts that fall between Twitter and the 500 to 1,000 words I would write in Scenttrail Marketing. I often create original content ON Scoop.it because whatever I’m writing falls in the crack between Twitter’s micro blog and what I think of as needing to be on my marketing blog.


I was taught NOT to pass through links on Scoop.it early on by the great curator @Robin Good . Robin has well over 1M views on Scoop.it now and his advice along with the patient advice of other great Scoop.it curators has my profile slouching toward 150,000 views.


Bryan is correct that some curators new to Scoop.it haven’t learned the Robin Good lesson yet. I agree it is frustrating to go to a link and not receive anything of value back, to simply need to click on another link. Curators who pass through links won’t scale, so the Darwinian impact will be they will learn to add value or die out.


For my part I always identify my Scoop.it links, probably about half the content I Tweet and about a quarter of my G+ shares. I also routinely share my favorite “Scoopiteers”, great content curators who taught me valuable lessons such as don’t simply pass through links but add “micro blogging” value via rich snippets.


When you follow or consistently share content from a great curator on Scooop.it you begin to understand HOW they shape the subjects they curate. I know, for example, Robin Good is amazing on new tools. Scoop.it anticipated this learning and built in a feature where I can suggest something to Robin.


This is when Scoop.it is at its most crowdsourcing best because I now have an army of curators who know I like to comment on and share content about design or BI or startups and they (other Scoopiteers) keep an eye out for me. There are several reasons Scoop.it is a “get more with less effort” tool and this crowdsourcing my curation is high on the list.


So, sorry you are sad to see Scoop.it links and understand your frustration. You’ve correctly identified the problem too – some curators don’t know how to use the tool yet. I know it is a lot to ask to wait for the Darwinian learning that will take place over generations, but Scoop.it and the web have “generations” that have the half life of a gnat so trust that the richness of the Scoop.it community will win in the end and “the end” won’t take long.


To my fellow Scoop.it curators we owe Bryan and Joseph thanks for reminding us of what Robin Good taught me – add value or your Scoop.it won’t scale. That lessons is applicable to much more than how we use Scoop.it.


Marty

Added to G+ too
https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/TUsNtsAsjWp

 


Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

add your insight...


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Karen Dietz's comment, August 22, 2014 2:07 PM
Right on Marty! I'm re-scooping this as a way to help that learning along about how to really use Scoop.it well and leverage it.
Karen Dietz's curator insight, August 22, 2014 2:25 PM

FYI Folks -- I trust that the reviews I write about the articles I curate help people along in their business storytelling journey. I know that there are many curators out there who do not add reviews/comments to the articles they highlight. 


As a result, Scoop.it and other curation sites are getting a backlash because audience members are tired of getting a link to an article that brings them to Scoop.it, and then requires another click to get to the article. Now I know that is annoying. And there is nothing of value offered between clicks.


Marty's response to the original blog post is right on. Read it along with all the other comments. Truly illuminating.


Other than a rant for me, what's the value of this post to you and business storytelling?


Namely this -- no matter what medium you use -- blogging, curating, digital storytelling -- make sure you are actually adding value for your audience. Expand their knowledge, give them tools, show them how, and offer your excellent insights. The stories you share have to connect to your audience in these ways. Anything else is a waste.


All of these posts and reviews add up to telling your story in a big picture way. So thanks Marty for addressing this issue, and reminding us about principles for quality curation. I've learned a lot from both you and Robin!


Karen Dietz

Bob Connelly's comment, November 23, 2014 7:11 PM
Being new to Scoop.it, I was glad to read this. I wouldn't have thought about this...
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
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SEO and Data Got A THING Going On | ScentTrail Marketing [going viral]

SEO and Data Got A THING Going On | ScentTrail Marketing [going viral] | Curation Revolution | Scoop.it

Had a brief conversation with Brian Yanish (@MartingHits) this morning via comments and spent the day trying to figure out the implications of a single thought:

Data (the content we create and curate) is the NETWORK now.

We've moved so far from Sun MicroSystems The Computer Is the Network. Heck we have the equivalent of the most powerful Sun MicroSystem in our pockets now. This thought created many implications such as:

* My post becomes OUR post.

* The Data Is The Network.

* Move from creator to curator and back again.

* We wait for The Great Data Pumpkin.

* We are all publishers now.

Had a fun day thanks to Brian. Hope you have fun reading about why we are all rebel disruptors now. Put on your beret, raise your fist and see if you agree the data is the network.

Here is to the rebel disruptors in all of us!

Curation Of SEO and Data Got A Thing Going On
Added a link to a great Google Plus discussion you can become part of here:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/106515636986325493284/posts/3J2atrbevXx


With over 300 views in less than 24 hours SEO and Data Got A Thing Going On is going viral thanks to 22 Retweets, 5 Facebook Likes and 7 Plus 1s. I'm curating and link the conversation here: http://scenttrail.blogspot.com/2012/11/seo-and-data-got-thing-going-on.html .

Join Us.

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Rescooped by Martin (Marty) Smith from Content Curation World
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What Is Curation and Why It's So Relevant? [Video]

***** Great video to help explain curation from Robin. Marty

Robin Good: A great video animation introducing some of the key ideas, dreams and concepts behind content curation.

 

From the video: "One of the most beautiful things about the Internet is this sort of radical discovery, where you start in a place that you are familiar with, that you trust, and then you drill down and down and chase the white rabbit and then you end up in some wonderland you didn't know existed.


The clip includes thoughts from some unique curators, picked and selected by Percolate, the company sponsoring this video. 


Inspiring. Insightful. 8/10


Find out more / watch original video: http://vimeo.com/38524181   


Via Robin Good
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