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New Content Curation Tool: Spundge Lets You Discover, Curate And Create Better Content

New Content Curation Tool: Spundge Lets You Discover, Curate And Create Better Content | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it

From Official Website:

"Spundge is the end-to-end tool for today's power curator. Connect with the best content creators on the web. Collaboratively curate the web and create relevant, influential content.

 

- Discover and Filter:

Create a Spundge Notebook to stay on top of a topic, person, company or interest. Spundge Notebooks deliver a stream of relevant content from news sources, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram and Flickr. Filter and then save the best of what you discover.

 

- Curate and Collaborate:

Invite friends and colleagues to collaborate on Notebooks and discover and save new items. Collaborators receive notifications when new content is saved, and can add comments to Notebook items. Collaborative Curation enables you to track information, while instantly sharing with friends and colleagues.

 

- Stream and Publish:

Transform your Notebook into a real-time stream you can embed anywhere on the web. Share what you’re reading, or curate a real-time newswire about a breaking event or topic of interest.

 

- Get Spundge PRO:

it enables teams and individuals to collaboratively create content and instantly publish to a CMS, email newsletter and social accounts. Writing in Spundge lets you drag and drop images, tweets and videos into any story, effortlessly add attribution, and easily embed and track content."

 

From review article on Nieman Journalism Lab:

"The problem is today’s journalist has to use too many products and applications to do their job, and very few of these were actually built with newsrooms or journalistic workflow in mind...

 

Spundge is a platform that’s built to take a journalist from information discovery and tracking all the way to publishing, regardless of whatever internal systems they have to contend with...

 

The software is free, but an optional $9 monthly fee adds premium features, including the ability to share notebooks with collaborators, who can also add to the notebook and see changes in real time..."

 

Read more on Nieman Journalism Lab here:

http://www.niemanlab.org/2012/09/first-look-spundge-is-software-to-help-journalists-to-manage-real-time-data-streams/

 

Check out Spundge here: http://www.spundge.com

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Steven Hughes's comment, September 23, 2012 11:31 AM
Thanks Giuseppe, have to take a closer look
Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, September 23, 2012 11:41 AM
@Steven...Thank you for appreciation about my post.
Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, September 24, 2012 8:27 AM
Hi Therese,
thank you for appreciation and rescoop my article.
I confirm that website is in English and French language.
Curation in Higher Education
Using curation strategies to enhance teaching and learning in higher education contexts.
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Curtin Teaching and Learning - eLearning: eLearning advisors

Curtin Teaching and Learning - eLearning: eLearning advisors | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The diverse team of eLearning advisors provide elearning workshops, send out periodic newsletter, provide customised consultation, support the eScholar program and more.

 

Use the Filter pull-down menu above to search for topics by keywords.


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Craig Patterson's comment, June 13, 2013 1:52 AM
Is this link working?
Kim Flintoff's comment, June 13, 2013 2:12 AM
The website was redesigned and we disappeared ... This scoop is simply a flag about who's curating... We didn't expect anyone wold ever want to visit us.....
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Content Curators as Cultural Intermediaries: “My reputation as a curator is based on what I curate, right?” | Daniel Ashton, Martin Couzins | M/C Journal

Content Curators as Cultural Intermediaries: “My reputation as a curator is based on what I curate, right?” | Daniel Ashton, Martin Couzins | M/C Journal | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Content Curators as Cultural Intermediaries: “My reputation as a curator is based on what I curate, right?”

 

In 2011 The Economist alerted us to the claim that “digital data will flood the planet.” The exponential increase in data such as e-mails, Tweets and Instagram pictures underpins claims that we are living in an age of ‘infoglut’ (Andrejevic) and information superabundance (Internet Live Stats). Several years earlier, Shirky posed this as an issue not of “information overload” but of “filter failure” (Asay). Shirky’s claim suggests that we should not despair in the face of unmanageable volumes of content, but develop ways to make sense of this information – to curate.

 

Reflecting on his experiences of curating the Meltdown Festival, David Byrne addressed the emergence of everyday curating practices: “Nowadays, everything and everyone can be curated. There are curators of socks, menus and dirt bike trails […] Anyone who has come up with a top-ten list is, in effect, a curator. And anyone who clicks ‘Like’ is a curator.”

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#FlipboardChat Summary: Curating Magazines for Research Studies | Flipboard

#FlipboardChat Summary: Curating Magazines for Research Studies | Flipboard | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
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When Two Worlds Don’t Collide: Can Social Curation Address the Marginalisation of Open Educational Practices and Resources from Outside Academia? | Journal of Interactive Media in Education

When Two Worlds Don’t Collide: Can Social Curation Address the Marginalisation of Open Educational Practices and Resources from Outside Academia? | Journal of Interactive Media in Education | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Abstract

A canyonesque gulf has long existed between open academia and many external subject communities. Since 2011, we have been developing and piloting the public open scholar role (Coughlan and Perryman 2012) - involving open academics discovering, sharing and discussing open educational resources (OER) with online communities outside formal education in order to help bridge this gulf. In 2013 we took the public open scholar into Facebook (Perryman and Coughlan, 2013) to reach an international audience of autism-focussed Facebook groups in India, Africa and Malaysia, with a combined membership of over 5000 people.

Performing the public open scholar role within Facebook led to our learning from group members about new resources produced by subject communities outside formal education, for example by voluntary sector organisations, government and professional bodies. These resources are surprisingly numerous and compare favourably with those from universities. Seeking to source more such resources we conducted a systematic large-scale search of free online courses, recording not only the number of learning materials available, but also how easy it was to find them.

We found that provision from formal education, especially universities, dominates the returned results when searching for free online courses. Consequently, resources from beyond formal education, while they exist, are difficult to find. Indeed, most aggregators and repositories proudly state that the free online courses they list are from 'Top Universities', appearing oblivious to provision from external subject communities. We extended our research to cover e-textbooks and found a similar situation, with content from formal education again dominating provision.

On the basis of these findings we suggest that the prominence of university-provided content within search aggregators not only marginalises externally produced resources, relegating them to even more obscurity than has been the case thus far, but also marginalises the open educational practices that were involved in the production of these resources. We propose that the OER movement’s questions about ways of involving end-users as co-producers may be answered by looking to external subject communities and, accordingly, we should be supporting and learning from these communities. In addition, there is a need for further research into the open educational practices of external subject communities, who are clearly more than just passive consumers of resources and are involved in both producing and adapting OER.

Our research has also led to our further developing the public open scholar role to include online content curation as a part of the process, on the basis of evidence indicating that online curation has the potential to help increase the discoverability of resources and raise awareness of open educational practices from beyond academia. In particular, we suggest that ‘social curation’ (Seitzinger, 2014) - which foregrounds sharing curated collections as a component of the curation process - has a key role in this regard. We also suggest that further research in this area could be beneficial, for example in exploring the potential for librarians to become involved in curating OER from outside academia.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/jime.ab
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I could be a more effective Social Curator

I could be a more effective Social Curator | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Yesterday I sat down to write a blog post about how I use Diigo for curation.  First I looked at Joyce Seitzinger's presentation on social curation at the EduTech Australia conference (Brisbane, 2 ...

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How to Use Flipboard Magazines in the Classroom - GRANTWOOD AEA

How to Use Flipboard Magazines in the Classroom - GRANTWOOD AEA | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Are you a Flipboard user? If not, you're missing out, because it is fast becoming an important part of an educator's PLN. If you've never tried it before, Flipboard is a popular news discovery app that works on iPhones, iPads, Androids, Windows, Windows Phones, and the web. It learns what you like and gives you a one-stop shop to check Facebook, Twitter, Google+, your favorite blogs, and more.

At Grant Wood AEA, the Digital Learning team have begin curating some of our favorite articles from around the web and we have been storing them all in Flipboard magazines. A magazine is a collection of websites, articles, photos, videos, and blog posts from around the web. Anyone can start a magazine, and lots of people do. In fact, an increasing number of educators are already using Flipboard Magazines in their classroom to enhance teaching and learning. How are they doing that? Check out the Flipboard Education blog for a collection of great stories and ideas that come directly from classroom teachers.

Via John Evans
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Social curation in the workplace - EduTech AU 2015 - Academic Tribe

Social curation in the workplace - EduTech AU 2015 - Academic Tribe | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
We are presenting today at EduTech AU 2015. We will be presenting on our work on social curation in the workplace.

Via catspyjamasnz, Mark Smithers
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Sigi Jakob's curator insight, June 3, 11:12 AM

scoop.it has been my choice for curating for some years now .. cool tool, very visual!

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How Content Curation Informs Content Creation

How Content Curation Informs Content Creation | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it

If you are actively curating content as a business strategy, you are sitting on a great source of guidance to help you pick good topics. Of course you’ll monitor success of your own content over time. But there’s more. You should keep tabs on a wider range of content to expand your purview.


Via Guillaume Decugis, catspyjamasnz
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M. Philip Oliver's curator insight, October 30, 2014 9:43 PM

Thanks Guillaume Decugis

Barbara Vermaas's curator insight, October 31, 2014 5:43 AM

Content curation is de 1e stap; dit geeft inzicht in wat er al beschikbaar is, en vooral, in wat er nog nodig is. En dus: geeft inzicht op welk gebied je content creation zou kunnen/moeten inzetten.

Dawn Matheson's curator insight, October 31, 2014 10:50 AM

We hear the term a lot - content curation. What is it, and how does it differ from social sharing in general.

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Journal of Interactive Media in Education

Journal of Interactive Media in Education | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Article: When Two Worlds Don’t Collide: Can Social Curation Address the Marginalisation of Open Educational Practices and Resources from Outside Academia?

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Curate Me! Exploring online identity through social curation in networked learning

Curate Me! Exploring online identity through social curation in networked learning | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Networked learning theory and the related literature express the importance of access to resources or content, but there is no singular way of discussing these information management processes. On the web, the rise in information abundance has seen
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Content Curation Lands on Google+: Introducing Collections

Content Curation Lands on Google+: Introducing Collections | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Nick Truch's curator insight, May 11, 7:36 AM

Une approche bigrement intéressante qui pourrait redonner de l'intérêt à Google+

Nancy White's curator insight, May 12, 5:38 PM

Excited to see how we might be able to set this up in our GAFE space - students already have accounts, so this is a natural fit to facilitate student curation!

Konstantinos Kalemis's curator insight, August 10, 4:58 AM

 

 

Google has just introduced "Collections", for Google+, a new service which allows any Google+ user to group his posts by topic and to create public, shareable collections of his favorite links, articles, videos and images.

 

To use Google Collections, simply go to your G+ profile page and then select "Collections" on the drop down menu appearing on the top left part of the page.

 

"Each collection can be shared publicly, privately, or with a custom set of people. Once you create your first collection, your profile will display a new tab where other people can find and follow your collections."

 

You can either create new posts containing whatever type of content inside a collection, or assign an existing, published post to a collection you have just created.

 

You can create as many collections as you like.

 

Google+ Collections is available on the web and on Android (iOS coming later).

 

 

My comment: Google+ Collections adds opportunity for creating additional value to G+ users by letting interests drive community engagement. This is a feature that sooner or later any social network will offer. 

 

Free to use.

 

Try it out now: https://plus.google.com/collections/welcome ;

 

 

 

More info:

 

Official Google announcement: https://plus.google.com/+googleplus/posts/7ZpGWeou2sV ;

 

Featured collections: https://plus.google.com/collections/featured ;

 

See also the official review from Techcrunch:

http://techcrunch.com/2015/05/04/google-turns-users-into-content-curators-with-new-collections-feature/ ;

 

Video tutorial: https://youtu.be/gtVNkbtS9g8 ;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Content Curation And The Future Of Search: The Howard Rheingold's Interview

Content Curation And The Future Of Search: The Howard Rheingold's Interview | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Are content curation and the future of search converging? Who will you trust when it comes to find out what alternatives to a problem are out there and you have only an Internet connection? How much individual freedom do you want
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Teaching with Content Curation

Teaching with Content Curation | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Content curation is the process of collecting, organizing and displaying information relevant to a particular topic. Teacher content curation can be used by students and students can be asked to sh...

Via Dan Kirsch
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Jocelyn Bassett's curator insight, April 2, 10:50 PM

Digital curation includes the up-keeping, safeguarding and enhancing of digital data throughout its duration.

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, May 28, 5:34 PM

La curation est aussi utilisable au cours !

Edgar Mata's curator insight, June 2, 8:16 AM

"La curación de contenidos es el proceso de recolectar, organizar y mostrar información relevante acerca de un tema en particular. Los contenidos curados por el profesor pueden ser empleados por los estudiantes para aprender."

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More than a desire for text: Online participation and the social curation of content

More than a desire for text: Online participation and the social curation of content | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Abstract

Why and on what bases do people choose content and share it in an online environment? At the centre of Henry Jenkins’ theory of convergence culture lie in the transforming links between active, participative audiences, media content and media corporations. However, the ‘textually motivated’ desire to participate in the circulation of and control over texts is just one among other key motives for the dissemination and recirculation of content. Ethnography-based research conducted at Masaryk University in the Czech Republic suggests that when exploring participation in textuality, performative self-exposure and self-presentation must be taken into account as well as the context of audiences’ everyday life. Thus, I propose to approach participation as based not only on a ‘will to text’ but also on a dialectical relationship between a ‘will to self-performance’ and a ‘will to conformity’. These three factors then impact on the social curation of content – a reflexive process in which members of the audience construct texts for consumption and recirculation.


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Curation: Manage Your Attention Not Just Your Time

Curation: Manage Your Attention Not Just Your Time | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it

This guest post is by Beth Kanter for Socialbrite and this is great for curators just starting out or a refresher for those of you who have been doing this for a while.

 

She tells you why curation is an important tool in your content strategy and gives you some good suggestions on how to do it effectively which I'm going to focus on here. Curation requires time and energy, and Beth's process really works because I'm doing this myself.

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

See full article here: [http://bit.ly/MyQ1Nw]


Via janlgordon
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Beth Kanter's comment, August 17, 2012 8:18 PM
Thanks for scooping!
Beth Kanter's comment, August 17, 2012 8:18 PM
Thanks so much for scooping!
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Harold Jarche: An Infographic Overview of Personal Knowledge Mastery

Harold Jarche: An Infographic Overview of Personal Knowledge Mastery | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it

A key part of the Seek > Sense > Share framework for PKM is to find new ways to explain things, or add value to existing information.


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, August 17, 5:42 PM

Harold Jarche is a thinker.  His ideas help clarify how to swim in the sea of digital information that online teachers and learners must navigate.  Intended for a business audience, Jarche's PKM approach also applies to anyone interested in the flow of information and how to transform that information into action. 

Joyce Valenza's curator insight, August 18, 7:38 AM

A visual overview of Harold Jarche's model for PKM

Florence Gilzene-Cheese's curator insight, August 22, 12:11 PM

The idea from the Seek, Sense, Share PKM network that speaks to the development of a framework for professional development. PKM is driven by metacognition and allows the individual to seek to fill identified knowledge gaps and make sense of the information that is available and further share the knowledge that is gained. This info-graphic supports the framework and identifies the flow among the ideas in the Seek, Sense, Share process of PKM.  

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Exploring Curation as a core competency in digital and media literacy education | Journal of Interactive Media in Education

Exploring Curation as a core competency in digital and media literacy education | Journal of Interactive Media in Education | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Abstract

In today’s hypermedia landscape, youth and young adults are increasingly using social media platforms, online aggregators and mobile applications for daily information use. Communication educators, armed with a host of free, easy-to-use online tools, have the ability to create dynamic approaches to teaching and learning about information and communication flow online. In this paper we explore the concept of curation as a student- and creation-driven pedagogical tool to enhance digital and media literacy education. We present a theoretical justification for curation and present six key ways that curation can be used to teach about critical thinking, analysis and expression online. We utilize a case study of the digital curation platform Storify to explore how curation works in the classroom, and present a framework that integrates curation pedagogy into core media literacy education learning outcomes.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/2013-02
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5 Common Content Curation Mistakes

5 Common Content Curation Mistakes | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
What do they say? You learn more from your mistakes than you failures. Not sure who they are but they must know what they are talking about. When I came

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David Byrne: a great curator beats any big company's algorithm

David Byrne: a great curator beats any big company's algorithm | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The Talking Heads member on curating the Southbank Centre's Meltdown festival, the unfairness of book awards, and why the best line-ups surprise.
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GUEST POST by Jay Cross: Why Content Curation Should be in Your Training Skillset

GUEST POST by Jay Cross: Why Content Curation Should be in Your Training Skillset | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Curation can boost your profit and help your people grow. It can save millions, reduce frustration, and boost the velocity of information in your organization. It starts in a gallery. You expect the curator of an art gallery to know the collection and to: search out the best items select for the collection authenticate and …

Via Jay Cross, catspyjamasnz
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Pamela Perry King's curator insight, June 2, 3:41 PM

Curation is a great way to build your Personal Learning Network. Would like to get a little bit better with it.

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, June 4, 8:38 PM

Curation is also a great form of DIY professional development. 

Consultants-E's curator insight, June 27, 5:03 PM

If you don't curate content already, you may find this interesting.

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Flipboard For The Web Turns Your PC Into A Beautiful Internet Magazine

Flipboard For The Web Turns Your PC Into A Beautiful Internet Magazine | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
When Flipboard launched for iPad back in 2010, it was like the Seinfeld of digital magazines, a publication about nothing. A year later the app brough...

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The Busy Person's Guide to Content Curation: A 3-Step Process

The Busy Person's Guide to Content Curation: A 3-Step Process | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
A complete guide with step-by-step instructions for efficient and expert content curation.

Via malek, massimo facchinetti, Luciana Viter
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malek's curator insight, May 25, 7:44 AM

There are some pitfalls to sharing without reading.

  • The story could be far worse quality than you anticipated, and it’d reflect poorly on your tastes and opinions.
  • The story could have a misleading headline. It could take an entirely different angle than you expected.
  • The words, language, and visuals may not be inline with your brand standards or policies.
  • You might be asked to give your opinion on the article.
  • Many people view it as a shady practice or even dishonest.
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5 Apps for Creating Digital Portfolios on iPads

5 Apps for Creating Digital Portfolios on iPads | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
As the end of the school year nears you may find yourself asking students to create collections of examples of their best work of the year. There are a lot of ways that your students could go about...
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Curator

Curator | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
twitter curation platform

 

Discover

Relevant conversations and trending topics on Twitter

Curate

Content to surface the best conversations using advanced filtering capabilities

Display

Great Twitter content on any screen to enhance your audience's experience

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Content Curation Takes Time

Content Curation Takes Time | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Kim Flintoff's insight:

Robin provides a useful and manageable checklist of essential criteria for effective curation.  Master the basics...

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Filomena Gomes's curator insight, April 18, 9:52 AM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Notwithstanding the viral content-marketing tam-tam keeps selling the idea of content curation as a miracle-shortcut to work less, produce more content and get all of the benefits that an online publisher would want to have, reality has quite a different shade.

To gain reader's attention trust and interest, it is evidently not enough to pull together a few interesting titles while adding a few lines of introductory text.

 

Unless your readers are not very interested themselves into the topic you cover, why would they take recomendations from someone who has not even had the time to fully go through his suggested resources?

Superficially picking apparently interesting content from titles or even automatically selecting content for others to read is like recommending movies or music records based on how much you like their trailers or their cover layouts.

 

Can that be useful beyond attracting some initial extra visibility?

 

How can one become a trusted information source if one does not thoroughly look and understand at what he is about to recommend?

This is why selling or even thinking the idea of using content curation as a time and money-saver is really non-sense.

Again, for some, this type of light content curation may work in attracting some extra visibility in the short-term, but it will be deleterious in the long one, as serious readers discover gradually that content being suggested has not even been read, let alone being summarized, highlighted or contextualized.

Content curation takes serious time.

 

A lot more than the one needed to create normal original content.

To curate content you need to:

Find good content, resources and references. Even if you have good tools, the value is in searching where everyone else is not looking. That takes time.

Read, verify and vet each potential resource, by taking the time needed to do this thoroughly.

Make sense of what that resource communicates or represents / offers and be able to synthesize it for non-experts who will read about it.

Synthesize and highlight the value of the chosen resource within the context of your interest area.

Enrich the resource with relevant references, and related links for those that will want to find out more about it.

Credit and attribute sources and contributors.

 Preserve, classify and archive what you want to curate.

Share, distribute, promote the curated work you have produced. Creating it is not enough.


(While it is certainly possible to do a good curation job without doing exactly all of the tasks I have outlined above, I believe that it is ideal to try to do as many as these as possible, as each adds more value to the end result you will create.)

 

These are many more steps and activities than the ones required to create an original piece of content.

Curation is all about quality, insight and attention to details.

It is not about quantity, speed, saving time, producing more with less.

 
Robert Kisalama's curator insight, April 18, 11:37 AM

truly Curation should not be  merely aggregating different links without  taking off time to reflect indeed it is very to end up like some one buying clothes impulsively only to realise you could have done without some of them.

Nedko Aldev's curator insight, April 19, 2:24 PM

 

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Curate or Die: Why You Must Curate Content in 2015

Curate or Die: Why You Must Curate Content in 2015 | Curation in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The key to success in a myriad of web content that may drown us in 2015 is to curate content. The whys and hows are explained in-depth inside this article.

Via Guillaume Decugis
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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, January 24, 3:23 AM

It's interesting to see that content curation is evolving from an opportunity to a necessity as communication shifts from traditional methods (PR, advertising, old-style SEO...) to new ones (content marketing, inbound marketing, social media...). In this new world of communication many things have changed and professionals or companies who want to get heard need to consider this question:


Do people listen to you because they have to or because they want to?


As my friend Steve Rosenbaum, author of Curation Nation, puts it in his latest book, Curate This, we can't rely anymore on captive audiences. Consumers filter out spammy messages which is why, to be heard, we have to curate or die.

Marta Torán's curator insight, January 26, 3:46 PM

La curación de contenidos, casi un imperativo si queremos sobrevivir a la información. Muy bueno.

Dean Ryan G. Martin's curator insight, January 28, 12:08 AM

It says "Content curation requires hard work." I disagree. Content curation is my hobby. I love curating contents even I'm not paid.