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Rescooped by Meridith Hembree Berry from Geography Education
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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | Curation for work | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

Via Seth Dixon
Meridith Hembree Berry's insight:

On average the American farmer feeds 155 people. One bushel of soybeans produces 48 pounds of protein rich meal and 11 pounds of oil. 

If farmers used the same practices from 1931, there would need to be 490 million more acres of land in production. This is 121 million more acres than the entire state of Alaska.  

What the world eats is grown by agriculturalists whether in a family garden or a 30,000 acre farm. Where would we be without them?  Hungry.

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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 4:02 PM

This gallery of 16 families from around world together with their week food is quite a treat that shows agricultural, development and cultural patterns.  Pictured above is the Ayme family from Ecuador, just one of the many family's highlighted in the book Hungry Planet.  The Ayme family that typically spends $31.55 on food and commonly eat potato soup with cabbage.  

 

Tags: food, agriculture, worldwide, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, book reviews, culture, development, unit 3 culture.

Rescooped by Meridith Hembree Berry from Geography Education
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61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan

61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan | Curation for work | Scoop.it

Manhole covers are ubiquitous in the modern urban fabric; they are typically drab and purely utilitarian.  In Japan, municipalities take pride in the this ordinary piece of the landscape and convert them into extraordinary works of art that reflect the local people, place and culture. 

 

Tags: book review, landscape, art, urban, culture, place, EastAsia.


Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:00 PM

This is a great take on art and the ways of celebrating Japan with touches of personal findings and ideas. These manhole covers are cheery and reflect a piece of Japan that not only tell stories, but embrace history.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 3:17 PM

While many would consider it silly to turn something as ordinary as manhole covers into pieces of art, I believe that it is an amazing way to represent the culture of a place. Different townships and neighborhoods in Japan have distinct designs that relate to that place. This acts as an artistic expression of the characteristics of that place, since the designs are often chosen and designed by the people of that place. Some covers show historical events, animals, and even religious symbolism. I would love to flip through the book and try to imagine why each place chose each design.