Curation for work
Follow
106 views | +0 today
Curation for work
These are topics which will assist me in my work.
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Meridith Hembree Berry from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan

61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan | Curation for work | Scoop.it

Manhole covers are ubiquitous in the modern urban fabric; they are typically drab and purely utilitarian.  In Japan, municipalities take pride in the this ordinary piece of the landscape and convert them into extraordinary works of art that reflect the local people, place and culture. 

 

Tags: book review, landscape, art, urban, culture, place, EastAsia.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 3:00 PM

This is a great take on art and the ways of celebrating Japan with touches of personal findings and ideas. These manhole covers are cheery and reflect a piece of Japan that not only tell stories, but embrace history.

Rescooped by Meridith Hembree Berry from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Curation for work | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s comment, August 3, 2013 1:55 PM
While not a crowd pleasing set of results, methinks that it is important to know where we were then, where we are now, and where we are going with it all.
Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s curator insight, August 3, 2013 1:59 PM

Various historical essays on population have captured the attention of many who may have otherwise tended to be indifferent to what had been obvious to the authors all along.

Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s comment, August 3, 2013 2:03 PM
Population density dependent malfunctions in societies include crime, disease, and even war.