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The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island

The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island | Curation for work | Scoop.it

"When viewed from above, a runoff of sand and silt creates the impression of an ‘underwater waterfall’, just off the coast of the island nation of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean."


Via Seth Dixon
Meridith Hembree Berry's insight:

This photo is a great example of the complexity and beauty of nature. I am awed by the view. Thank you for sharing. 

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, September 26, 2013 8:19 AM

this look pretty nice i would like to go see it in person

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:36 AM

By looking at this picture you automatically think its a waterfall within the water. This image is actually just showing the mix of sand and silt deposits mixing together. The light to dark colors is what makes it look like a waterfall. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:24 PM

Another spectacular sight. Of course, you will need a plane or helicopter to venture above it to see it, but this illusion is pretty nifty.

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American Homes Through the Decades

American Homes Through the Decades | Curation for work | Scoop.it

New homes dominate the market across the Sunbelt, but you can also find older homes with historical features and distinct architectural styles in most major metros -- from stained glass windows in homes built before the 1900s to snail showers found in homes from the 2000s.


Via Seth Dixon
Meridith Hembree Berry's insight:

This interactive map is quite fascinating to view the settlement patterns. Drop in the rivers. Consider the movement to the Sunbelt. This would make for a really interesting essay to speculate (and support) the reasons people move to specific areas.  

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 2013 8:38 AM

This interactive feature shows some intriguing historical insight into the United States metropolitan housing markets and this article associated with the interactive analyzes the growth trends in particular cities.

 

Questions to Ponder: how is this real estate interactive a portal into the historical economic geography of U.S. cities?  What explains the regional patterns?  New England?  Texas?  


Tagshousing, urban, unit 7 cities.

Rescooped by Meridith Hembree Berry from Geography Education
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6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You

6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You | Curation for work | Scoop.it
From the food we eat to the energy, transportation, and water we all need, a warmer world will bring big changes for everyone.

 

B Sinica: This article touches every aspect of geography from culture to climate [considering] how the growing population plays the biggest role in determining the future of life on Earth.  People need to recognize the problems and potential future issues with global warming and the rapidly changing environment.  Though not many issues can be prevented or even solved, the least we can do is try to lessen the severity of devastation and prolong the current conditions as much as possible before the world becomes too extreme to manage.


Via Seth Dixon
Meridith Hembree Berry's insight:

Whether global warming is a natural cycle or a manmade event, this topic will likely never be agreed upon. The important issue is how do we deal with the reality as we try to determine if our actions can be modified to mitigate the consequences of global warming.  

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Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 7:22 PM
It is kind of a scary thought that global warming could greatly disrupt the way we live. Everyone is affected by it especially businesses like farms. The production of crops declines because of the excessive heat. Changing climate affect the length of each season which hurts the process of growing and harvesting crops. There would also be a change in the production, storage and transportation. It will cost more money to properly manage these businesses. This change will not only affect companies and how we handle our food but also our way of life and health. We would all have to adapt to such drastic changes in the environment which may be a struggle for some. Health wise, if it is too hot and people are not well adapted then it could lead to hospitalization and increased health risks. I don’t think there is much we can do to lessen the severity because it is a natural cycle of earth. I do think we may have sped up the process a little bit, for example car exhaustion and greenhouse gasses. But we are so dependent on such technology we can’t just make it disappear.
Dillon Cartwright's comment, May 3, 2013 1:04 PM
It's crazy that something like a little climate change can change the affect the entire world. Not just in one way either, it affects the world in many ways, like the 6 mentioned above. I don't think people realize the frailty of the environment they live in. Something as small as someones car exhaust becomes kind of a big deal when there are hundreds of millions of cars in the world.
In addition to that, I think it's great that life expectancy has gone up with cures to diseases and advances in modern medicine. It's a good thing that people are living longer lives, but it's a problem when these people aren't environmentally conscious. If there is going to be a consistent increase in population, there should also be an increase in environmental awareness so everyone can work together in slowing down this destructive process.
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:03 AM

Climate change is going to affect how we live in the future. It will cause lack of food, energy sources, health risks, climate changes, drought etc. It is because of our growing population and the amount of people the world has to take care of for all of us to survive. We are also using too many of its resources too quickly. What could we do now to try to slow down the process of it happening? 

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Geography game: how well do you know the world?

Geography game: how well do you know the world? | Curation for work | Scoop.it
Play the Global development game: identify the world's countries and territories, rank them according to GDP then fingers at the ready for the picture round

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Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, December 22, 2012 12:42 AM

Geography game

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 26, 2012 3:46 AM

Are you ready?

 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 11, 2013 9:07 PM

Ughhhhhh, this is addicting. Must stop playing. Must keep playing so I can beat JC.

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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Curation for work | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article.


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Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s curator insight, August 3, 2013 1:59 PM

Various historical essays on population have captured the attention of many who may have otherwise tended to be indifferent to what had been obvious to the authors all along.

Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s comment, August 3, 2013 2:03 PM
Population density dependent malfunctions in societies include crime, disease, and even war.
Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 7:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

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Extension Network Pays Off in Sandy’s Wake | College of Agriculture & Natural Resources

Extension Network Pays Off in Sandy’s Wake | College of Agriculture & Natural Resources | Curation for work | Scoop.it

Cooperative Extension employees help families in MD after Hurricane Sandy http://t.co/CXJzLPnt...

Extension is not just about cows and cookies!   

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Driver Made To Wear Idiot Sign As Punishment

Driver Made To Wear Idiot Sign As Punishment | Curation for work | Scoop.it

A bus driver in Cleveland filmed the woman as she took a detour off the road to get around a parked school bus. (RT @stationsarge: http://t.co/SGt3lRRo This is my idea of restorative justice!

I do not believe 2 days wearing a sign will change her ways.  After a suspension, and a fine, the driver needs to retake the entire driving exam. Maybe a provisional license would be appropriate in some of these cases.  

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Infographic: 3 myths of social media ROI | Articles | Main

Infographic: 3 myths of social media ROI | Articles | Main | Curation for work | Scoop.it

Don't let these falsehoods hold your measurement efforts back. It's time to learn the truth.

As our organizations move to engage diverse audiences through various social media, we need to be careful not to pat ourselves on the back just because we have a presence. Impact and influence is more than just showing up.   

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Geographic Ignorance

Chelsie Hightower is confused on DWTS. Helio Castroneves does his best to educate her. Does he succeed? LET'S FIND OUT.

 

This is painful, but highlights once again why everyone should learn some basic geography.  

 

Tags: GeographyEducation, video.


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Kalin B.'s comment, November 5, 2012 8:31 AM
It's somewhat depressing to see when people don't grasp the very world they inhabit.
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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Curation for work | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

Via Seth Dixon
Meridith Hembree Berry's insight:

Water is truly awesome. We play in it, we drink it, we rely on it for so many things and yet it is one of nature's most powerful elements. There is nothing that, with time, water cannot break down. What mankind has built, water can destroy in minutes. Magnificent photos of heart wrenching destruction. 

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Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:57 AM

CD 4: The human causes and effects of landscape degradation

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:59 AM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 8:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
Rescooped by Meridith Hembree Berry from Geography Education
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Aral Sea Basin

Aral Sea Basin | Curation for work | Scoop.it

"Dust blows from what was once the Aral Sea floor. Tragic mismanagement of a natural resource."


Via Seth Dixon
Meridith Hembree Berry's insight:

This environmental disaster has been in the making for decades. It is a good example of how political and economic priorities need to factor in environmental impacts for long term viability. There is no quick fix for making a quick buck at the expense of mother nature. 

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 20, 6:49 PM

This is a sad reality humans must live with forever and something we as people must learn from. A man made disaster that occurred many years ago has a negative impact on areas surrounding the shrinking Aral Sea to this day. People cannot exploit an area of water this large, as this is not only harming the environment, but many human beings, as well

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 6:24 AM

This startling picture from space of the Aral Sea is heartbreaking.  The destruction of this inland sea is a terrible thing to behold.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 5:36 PM

The Aral Sea Basin has been a topic of conversation throughout geography for many reasons. What used to be filled with water is now blowing dust because its that dry? This basin is no longer a natural resource.

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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | Curation for work | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

Via Seth Dixon
Meridith Hembree Berry's insight:

On average the American farmer feeds 155 people. One bushel of soybeans produces 48 pounds of protein rich meal and 11 pounds of oil. 

If farmers used the same practices from 1931, there would need to be 490 million more acres of land in production. This is 121 million more acres than the entire state of Alaska.  

What the world eats is grown by agriculturalists whether in a family garden or a 30,000 acre farm. Where would we be without them?  Hungry.

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John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 7:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 2:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 2:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
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61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan

61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan | Curation for work | Scoop.it

Manhole covers are ubiquitous in the modern urban fabric; they are typically drab and purely utilitarian.  In Japan, municipalities take pride in the this ordinary piece of the landscape and convert them into extraordinary works of art that reflect the local people, place and culture. 

 

Tags: book review, landscape, art, urban, culture, place, EastAsia.


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 3:00 PM

This is a great take on art and the ways of celebrating Japan with touches of personal findings and ideas. These manhole covers are cheery and reflect a piece of Japan that not only tell stories, but embrace history.

Rescooped by Meridith Hembree Berry from Geography Education
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Following 'Geography Education'

Following 'Geography Education' | Curation for work | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.

 

Staying Connected: You can receive post updates in the way that best fits how you use social media.

Update Notifications: Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest.

              Email: Click 'follow' button at top right of this page.

Sites with Content: Wordpress, Scoop.it.


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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, January 24, 2013 2:34 PM

A great interactive map to learn about different regions of the world.

chris tobin's curator insight, January 24, 2013 2:35 PM

This is a really cool map from class

Marie Schoeman's curator insight, February 20, 2013 1:07 AM

This site collects interesting sites on Geography Teaching. It is anticipated that there will also be articles on differentiation which could assist teachers to present Geography in an inclusive way.

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Ann Barnes Independent Kent Police Commissioner Candidate - Helping Victims through Restorative Justice

Ann Barnes Independent Kent Police Commissioner Candidate - Helping Victims through Restorative Justice | Curation for work | Scoop.it

  Restorative Justice



I can honestly say that this is an issue close to my heart. We have used it ourselves at home, when a ...

I like Ann's 2 points- first, the victim MUST be at the center of the restorative justice process. Help them to overcome the fear of being a victim. And, there must be resources to sustain the process.  

Holding youth accountable and forcing them to face their victims is not the only factor in keeping them from re-offending.  I think the parents of the youth have an important role in holding the youth accountable and reminding them of the consequenses of bad behavior. I would have loved to see the mom "frogmarching" the kid to the door to atone.  

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In Case Of Emergency Use Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter

In Case Of Emergency Use Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter | Curation for work | Scoop.it

In Case Of Emergency Use Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC] (Infographic about social media use during emergencies (& Twitter very widely used!

The three most used social media outlets by FEMA are YouTube, FaceBook and Twitter (least to most). Social media is slowly replacing the the telephone and television as primary sources of infomation. Social media like Twitter provides the public with real time information AND a filter to choose what to read.

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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olivia estrugo's curator insight, November 12, 2013 11:01 AM

Interesting video.

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 6:37 AM

After watching this short clip, it puts the popluation into perspective. I never knew how quickly the populaiton could grow and this video is a pure example of how it does. Over population is going to be a major problem in the future.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:07 AM

Watching this video made me think how or if it's possible to have that many people on earth and still have enough food, jobs, and shelter for everyone. The carrying capacity seems way too densed. It is possible to fit a high number of people in one area year by year as long as we know how to use the space thats given to us. I dont think many countries have come up with an good logic or plans on how to sustain the overpopulated areas throught the globe. If they did, then there would be enough food, shelter, and jobs. There wouldn't be so many people unemployed, malnourished, and homeless if the government would come up with a plan.