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First we get proof of heaven; now the secret of immortality

First we get proof of heaven; now the secret of immortality | curating your interests | Scoop.it

This story is all over the internet but here is a real look at the "immortal" jellyfish


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Wild parrots name their babies | video |

Wild parrots name their babies | video | | curating your interests | Scoop.it
Wild green-rumped parrotlet parents give their babies their own individual names...

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Why your brain sees men as people and women as body parts

Why your brain sees men as people and women as body parts | curating your interests | Scoop.it
The sexual objectification of women isn’t just in your head—it’s in everyone’s. A new study finds that our brains see men as people and women as body parts.

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Does your name influence the jobs you choose?

Does your name influence the jobs you choose? | curating your interests | Scoop.it
A rose by any other name would smell as sweet, but would Usain Bolt, by any other name, be as fast? How much do our names determine what we do in life?

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Singing mice show signs of learning

Singing mice show signs of learning | curating your interests | Scoop.it
Guys who imitate Luciano Pavarotti or Justin Bieber to get the girls aren't alone. Male mice may do a similar trick, matching the pitch of other males' ultrasonic serenades.

 

The mice also have certain brain features, somewhat similar to humans and song-learning birds, which they may use to change their sounds, according to a new study.

 

"We are claiming that mice have limited versions of the brain and behavior traits for vocal learning that are found in humans for learning speech and in birds for learning song," said Duke neurobiologist Erich Jarvis, who oversaw the study. The results appear Oct. 10 in PLOS ONE and are further described in a review article in Brain and Language.

 

The discovery contradicts scientists' 60-year-old assumption that mice do not have vocal learning traits at all. "If we're not wrong, these findings will be a big boost to scientists studying diseases like autism and anxiety disorders," said Jarvis, who is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. "The researchers who use mouse models of the vocal communication effects of these diseases will finally know the brain system that controls the mice's vocalizations."

 

Jarvis acknowledged that the findings are controversial because they contradict scientists' long-held assumption about mice vocalizations....


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In the Future, Your DNA May be the Only Hard Drive You'll Ever Need

In the Future, Your DNA May be the Only Hard Drive You'll Ever Need | curating your interests | Scoop.it
Researchers from Harvard have now encoded an entire book in molecules of DNA- the building blocks of life.

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10 Reasons Why Your Brain Hates Long Business Meetings - Forbes

10 Reasons Why Your Brain Hates Long Business Meetings - Forbes | curating your interests | Scoop.it

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Producing 3-D Printed Meat

Producing 3-D Printed Meat | curating your interests | Scoop.it

Billionaire Peter Thiel would like to introduce you to the other, other white meat. The investor’s philanthropic Thiel Foundation’s Breakout Labs is offering up a six-figure grant (between $250,00 and $350,000, though representatives wouldn’t say exactly) to a Missouri-based startup called Modern Meadow that is flipping 3-D bio-printing technology originally aimed at the regenerative medicine market into a means to produce 3-D printed meat.


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