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Learning as a creative activity of connecting resources in communities, learning networks and constructive self-learners * how to include Curation Methods, Tools and Plattforms in Social Learning
Curated by Heiko Idensen
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Rescooped by Heiko Idensen from Teaching in the XXI Century!

10 Predictions for Personalized Learning for 2013

10 Predictions for Personalized Learning for 2013 | Curating-Social-Learning |
Check out what Personalized Learning will be like in 2013.

Via Kathleen McClaskey, João Greno Brogueira
Serge Renard's curator insight, April 30, 2013 7:18 AM

Serge Renard's curator insight, April 30, 2013 7:20 AM

Thomas Salmon's curator insight, May 6, 2013 1:34 PM

Interesting, in other ways this could also be seen as framing learning as a constant performance of assessment. Where do you draw the line ?

Rescooped by Heiko Idensen from Agile Learning!

The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead?

The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead? | Curating-Social-Learning |

"Is it really about teaching more, in less time, with shrinking budgets?  Or are we doing our brains & our bottom line a disservice, including conference event planning?"  


This is a great post on how to leverage learning that sticks, is sticky, vs. a spray and pray approach that still, unfortunately, dominates training programs and many conference events.


Here's an excerpt of this great post by 


Fresh thinking about how we learn
There are two kinds of learning. Learning physical tasks, like how to snowboard...embedded through repetition in the deeper motor regions of the brain such as the basal ganglia. This is known as procedural memory.

For workplace learning to be useful, we need to be able to recall ideas easily. 

In the last decade, Neuroscientists discovered that whether an idea can be easily recalled is linked to the strength of activation of the hippocampus during a learning task.

Many corporate training programs are the mental equivalent of trying to eat a week of meals in a day.


With this finding, scientists such as Lila Davachi at NYU and others have been able to test out many variables involved in learning experiences, such as what happens to the hippocampus if you distract people while absorbing information.


Over a few months of collaboration, Lila Davachi and I, along with Tobias Keifer, a consultant from Booz & Co., found a useful pattern that summarized the four biggest factors that determined the quality of recall. These are:

  • Attention, 
  • Generation, 
  • Emotion and 
  • Spacing, or the ‘AGES’ model. 

The AGES model was first presented at the 2010 NeuroLeadership Summit, and then published in the 2010 NeuroLeadership Journal. Read the full post including Learning that lasts through AGES that has a summary of this important research here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Rescooped by Heiko Idensen from Innovations in e-Learning!

Understanding the Value of Curation for Education: Nancy White

Understanding the Value of Curation for Education: Nancy White | Curating-Social-Learning |

Robin Good: What does curation mean from an educational viewpoint? And what is the key difference between "collecting" and "curating".

Nancy White (@NancyW), a 21st Century Learning & Innovation Specialist and the author of Innovations in Education blog, has written an excellent article, dissecting the key characterizing traits of curation, as a valuable resource to create and share knowledge. 


She truly distills some key traits of curation in a way that is clear and comprehensible to anyone.


She writes: "The first thing I realized is that in order to have value-added benefits to curating information, the collector needs to move beyond just classifying the objects under a certain theme to deeper thinking through a) synthesis and b) evaluation of the collected items.


How are they connected?"


Excellent definition. 


And then she also frames perfectly the relevance of "context" for any meaningful curation project by writing: "I believe when we curate, organization moves beyond thematic to contextual – as we start to build knowledge and understanding with each new resource that we curate.


Themes have a common unifying element – but don’t necessarily explain the “why.”


Theme supports a central idea – Context allows the learner to determine why that idea (or in this case, resource) is important.


So, as collecting progresses into curating, context becomes essential to determine what to keep, and what to discard."


But there's a lot more insight distilled in this article as Nancy captures with elegance the difference between collecting for a personal interest and curating for a specific audience. 


She finally steals my full endorsement for this article by discretely inquirying how great a value it would be to allow students to "curate" the domains of interest they need to master.


Excellent. Highly recommended. 9/10


Full article: ;

Via Robin Good, Gust MEES, k3hamilton
Beth Kanter's comment, July 8, 2012 1:22 PM
I especially like how she used the Bloom's Taxonomy and related that to curation.
Stalder Angèle's comment, August 1, 2012 3:56 AM
Thank you for this scoop!
Shaz J's comment, August 5, 2012 10:39 AM
Thanks for this!
Scooped by Heiko Idensen!

Google Plus for learning |

Google Plus for learning | | Curating-Social-Learning |
Innovative ways of using Google Plus (education, training, health, social good) ( )...
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