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Curate THIS!
My CURRENT reading list about curation, the idea, its context, limits, and extension. Favoring IMpractical: no "how to's" or "7 ways to"
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Design Thinking and Data Science - Data

Design Thinking and Data Science - Data | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it
By Dean Malmgren and Jon Wettersten There’s a lot of hype around “Big Data” these days. Don’t believe us? None other than the venerable Harvard Business Review named “data scientist” the...
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Understanding Content Curation

Understanding Content Curation | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it

On her blog, Nancy White did a great job detailing the various levels at which Curation adds value. And how it differs from collecting.


A Learning & Innovation specialist, she also greatly outlines how curation and education are a great fit.


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ProfessorBill Santiago's curator insight, October 21, 2014 12:08 PM

 

What do I need to know in order to give good safe care to those who are sick?

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FuturistSpeaker.com – The personal blog of Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » 2050 and the Future of Transportation

FuturistSpeaker.com – The personal blog of Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » 2050 and the Future of Transportation | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it

This is a blog produced by Thomas Frey, Senior Futurist at the DaVinci Institute, and Google's top rated futurist speaker. Unlike most speakers, Tom works closely with his Board of Visionaries to develop original research studies, which enables him to speak on unusual topics, translating trends into unique opportunities.


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Exploratory Design for Curated Collections: Empowering Spatial, Experiential Interaction Through Information Landscapes

Exploratory Design for Curated Collections: Empowering Spatial, Experiential Interaction Through Information Landscapes | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Tim Wray explores the new frontiers of curated collections (from a museum perspective), and in doing so, he analyzes the concept of "landscapes", a possible emerging metaphor for how large sets of relevant information items could be better organized for viewing, even outside the specific museum setting.

 

His goal in doing this is one of finding out how to build effective interfaces that reveal and unravel narratives within collections. How can that be designed into the collection?

 

Tim Wray is particularly interested in this research, because he is also the brain behind a new and upcoming app called A Place for Art, and which has likely lots to do with art exploration and discovery.

 

The key point he makes in this interesting article (part of a longer series) is the illustration of the two concepts of "containers" and "landscapes", and about how they closely relate to the organization and access of curated collections.

 

In Tim Wray's view, the future, especially when we look at large collections, is in the increased adoption of "landscapes" organizing approaches versus the ever-present "container" approach we use for most collections today.

 

He writes: "I hint at the necessary shift from the former to the latter as a mechanism for providing context for objects, and how landscapes – combined with engaging interaction designs and the notion of pliability – can used as a way of providing immersive experiences for museum collections."

 

I think that Tim's ideas reflect a growing critical issue for anyone who attempts to curate large collections of information items: having an organization and navigation system that helps the newcomer, find and discover what it may interest him the most.

 

I myself feel quite frustrated by the absence of curation tools that truly allow me to organize and make accessible / discoverable large lists of information items in more effectives ways than the typical list, table or grid.

 

But I am positive that the future of curation will inevitably revolve around those who will find, invent and design new and effective ways to do so.

 

P.S.: Tim Wray is a PhD student that looks at how computational methods and interaction design can be used to create beautiful, engaging experiences for museum collections.

 

Very Interesting. Must-read for app designers. 9/10

 

Full article: http://timwray.net/2012/07/collections-as-landscapes-thoughts-in-experiential-interaction/

 

 


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The Best Quora Q&A Contributions Curated Into Organic Articles: Curaqion

The Best Quora Q&A Contributions Curated Into Organic Articles: Curaqion | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Curaqion is a new curated web magazine, available monthly also in PDF format, that focuses on curating unique, rare and fascinating questions and answers from Quora.

 

What Curaqion does is to syntesize, edit, filter and re-assemble interesting set of answers to a Quora question in a way that creates a whole, organic and comprehensive content unit that is better than a long and unsorted list of disjoined answers.

 

Example of a curated Q&A: http://curaqion.com/issue/02/two-train-tracks-vs-dedicated-2-lane-road-for-efficiency

 

The original on Quora: http://www.quora.com/Transportation/If-you-replaced-2-train-tracks-with-a-dedicated-2-lane-road-and-ran-passenger-buses-would-it-be-more-efficient

 

Another one: http://curaqion.com/issue/02/get-over-low-tolerance-for-stupid-people (curated)

 

original on Quora: http://www.quora.com/How-do-I-get-over-my-low-tolerance-for-stupid-people

 

 

Download Curaqion issues in PDF format: http://curaqion.com/issues

 

Subscribe to monthly newsletter: http://tinyletter.com/curaqion

 

Free to read: http://curaqion.com/

 

 


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Create Your Own Digital Document Library on the Web with Invenio

Create Your Own Digital Document Library on the Web with Invenio | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it


Robin Good: Invenio is an open-source software allowing anyone to build and maintain a professional document library on the web.

 

Invenio provides all the tols needed to coordinate all of the aspects of digital library management, from document ingestion through classification, indexing, and curation to dissemination.

 

Invenio complies with standards such as the Open Archives Initiative metadata harvesting protocol (OAI-PMH) and uses MARC 21 as its underlying bibliographic format. Invenio outputs / exports its contents in multiple formats including: HTML, XML, OAI, MARC.

 

Invenio has been originally developed at CERN to run the CERN document server, managing over 1,000,000 bibliographic records in high-energy physics since 2002, covering articles, books, journals, photos, videos, and more.

 

Key features: http://invenio-software.org/wiki/General/Features

 

Sites already using it: http://invenio-software.org/wiki/General/Demo

 

More info: http://invenio-software.org/

 

P.S.: You will need a technical person to download and install the Invenio software.

(Download page: http://invenio-software.org/wiki/Installation/Download)

 

 


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How to curate content: The best ideas, resources, and tools | Aaron Hoos

How to curate content: The best ideas, resources, and tools | Aaron Hoos | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it
Have you ever walked into a restaurant and been unsure what to order because there are so many options? People can become overwhelmed by choice to the point where they ...
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Curators Create The Metadata Needed To Enable Our Emerging Collective Intelligence

Curators Create The Metadata Needed To Enable Our Emerging Collective Intelligence | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it

Robin Good selected this post, well worth reading the post and Howard's book as well.


Robin Good: Participatory culture writer and book author Henry Jenkins interviews cyberculture pioneer Howard Rheingold (Net Smart, 2012) by asking him to explain some of the concepts that have helped him become a paladin of the  and "new literacies" so essential for survival in the always-on information-world we live in today.

 

This is part three of a long and in-depth interview (Part 2, Part 1) covering key concepts and ideas as the value of "community" and "networks", the architecture of participation, affinity working spaces, and curation.

Here is a short excerpt of Howard response to a question about curation and its value as both a “fundamental building block” of networked communities and as an important form of participation:

 

Howard Rheingold: "...at the fundamental level, curation depends on individuals making mindful and informed decisions in a publicly detectable way.

 

Certainly just clicking on a link, “liking” or “plussing” an item online, adding a tag to a photograph is a lightweight element that can be aggregated in valuable ways (ask Facebook).

 

But the kind of curation that is already mining the mountains of Internet ore for useful and trustworthy nuggets of knowledge, and the kind that will come in the future, has a strong literacy element.

 

Curators don’t just add good-looking resources to lists, or add their vote through a link or like, they summarize and contextualize in their own words, explicitly explain why the resource is worthy of attention, choose relevant excerpts, tag thoughtfully, group resources and clearly describe the grouping criteria."

 

In other words, "curators" are the ones creating the metadata needed to empower our emerging collective intelligence.

 

Curation Is The Social Choice About What Is Worth Paying Attention To.

 

Good stuff. In-depth. Insightful. 8/10

 

Full interview: http://henryjenkins.org/2012/08/how-did-howard-rheingold-get-so-net-smart-an-interview-part-three.html

 

 


Via Robin Good, Beth Kanter
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Shaz J's comment, September 3, 2012 3:20 AM
You're welcome :)

It's interesting interesting that you mention POV and stance, as that is not something I had explicitly articulated for myself, but naturally it must be implicitly true. In that sense, it reminds me (again) that curation forces self-reflection in order to present the content better, and that can only be a good thing.
Liz Renshaw's comment, September 8, 2012 9:57 PM
Agree with posts about curation guiding self reflection. This interview in particular is top value and two of my fav people indeed.
Andrew McRobert's curator insight, August 19, 2014 8:43 AM

8. This links a series of three interviews quite lengthy but there is some insightful information for the novice in the digital information age. There is video links within the article, including a great question and answer with Robin Good on curation. The video brings a balance to this inclusion.

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When is the social curation bubble going to burst?

When is the social curation bubble going to burst? | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it
French startup Pearltrees just scored another $6 million to help scale up its social curation service that helps people save, sort and share what they find on the web. But with dozens of services in play, is this a bubble waiting to pop?
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This Curation Trend has One Big Problem: Scale

This Curation Trend has One Big Problem: Scale | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it
Like it or not, the curators are coming. And I'm not talking about the kind that work with Art.sy.

The latest wave of curation goes beyond Drudge Report-style link aggregation. It's about ad...
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The Critical Importance of Time When Understanding Influence | Social Media Today

The Critical Importance of Time When Understanding Influence | Social Media Today | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it

If people are trying to influence a conversation to ensure their message resonates throughout their target audience it is essential that they target the right people, at the right time in the right manner. Too often people only focus on who are the right people but haven’t access to the right tools to engage.


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Plan Your Personal Learning Project on The Teach Jim Show 12/11 ...

Plan Your Personal Learning Project on The Teach Jim Show 12/11 ... | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it
In every ordinary person we find the extraordinary. In every extraordinary person we find the ordinary. "Teach" Jim and share your unique contribution that we may all learn a little more by learning from the lives we lead.
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FuturistSpeaker.com – The personal blog of Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » 2050 and the Future of Transportation

FuturistSpeaker.com – The personal blog of Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » 2050 and the Future of Transportation | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it

This is a blog produced by Thomas Frey, Senior Futurist at the DaVinci Institute, and Google's top rated futurist speaker. Unlike most speakers, Tom works closely with his Board of Visionaries to develop original research studies, which enables him to speak on unusual topics, translating trends into unique opportunities.


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A throwdown about the term ‘curator’

A throwdown about the term ‘curator’ | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it
Lately, questions about the bastardisation of the term curator have been emerging around the blogosphere. The Hermitage Museum wrote An Open Letter to Everyone Using the Word ‘Curate’ Incorrect...

 


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Paula Silva's comment, July 14, 2012 10:15 PM
This is a wonderful and valuable curated topic. Keep on sharing! I’m convinced that this could be an interesting research topic.
Thank you.
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Social Trust Factor: 10 Tips to Establish Credibility | Social Media Today

Social Trust Factor: 10 Tips to Establish Credibility | Social Media Today | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it
social media trust factor When building an online persona and brand usually we start with the most basic aspects including over arching brand, logo, colors, core messages etc.  All of these are foundational to success.

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EXPLORING EPORTFOLIO TECHNOLOGIES WEB SERIES- LIVETEXT

The "Exploring ePortfolio Technologies" series continues with LiveText on behalf of AAEEBL, ePortfolio California, and EPAC. The LiveText product was founded...
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The Discoverability Problem: How To Get Out of the Filter Bubble Recommendation Systems?

The Discoverability Problem: How To Get Out of the Filter Bubble Recommendation Systems? | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it


Robin Good: Brett Sandusky attacks the "discovery" topic with simple, straight logic, analyzing what all the new startups and the new tech fanatics seem to systematically look over.

 

How can you help me discover new stuff, if you are intentionally limiting your exploratory gathering to algorithms and to, however varied, network of contacts?

 

She writes: "The discoverability problem in books is a challenge. It’s about connecting users to new and interesting titles, that they wouldn’t normally have seen. This last part bears repeating: …that they wouldn’t normally have seen.

 

Ultimately, the problem with all these discoverability sites is this: their algorithms (if they are even using an algorithm) are based on aggregate data in a one size fits all model.


The more people who read something, the more often it shows up in your recommendations. But, that’s not discoverability. That’s the NYT bestseller list. That’s Nielsen Bookscan telling you the top sales of the week.


Just because most of my friends are reading bestsellers (because, duh, whose aren’t? In fact, that seems to just reinforce the concept of the term “bestseller”) does that mean I should only be shown these titles?

 

Obviously, the answer is no. But, how do we get there?"

 

The answer is that we need a) more expert and qualified human intervention to unearth and pick new stuff, and b) behavioral data coupled with data collected on customer preference to allows us to connect those selected materials to the users in the system.

 

 

Rightful. Timely. 8/10

 

Find out: http://www.brettsandusky.com/2012/10/05/discover-me/

 

(Image credit: Josephine Wall - Discovery)

 

 


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Robin Good's comment, October 14, 2012 3:56 AM
Too bad that it is only in Russian, as I can't make much sense of whether there is real value in there or not. Or is it there a western language edition?
RPattinson-Daily's comment, October 14, 2012 8:20 AM
Robin Good, thank You for attention to my comment. Unfortunately, due to crisis of 2008 plans of creation its western language edition were terminated. However, concept, technologies, business model of such recommendation service for creative goods (books, movies, music) were described in book “The Economics of Symbolic Exchange” by Alexander Dolgin (2006) (http://www.amazon.com/Economics-Symbolic-Exchange-Alexander-Dolgin/dp/354079882X). I was content curator, market researcher and editor of this book.
It can be read by parts/chapters depending on interest (see its Contents in Amazon). For example, chapter 1.3 about consumer navigation in creative industry such as online music market, ch.2.7 – survey of recommender systems. The music industry was first where recommendation systems based on collaborative filtering were implemented (for example Last.Fm, and many others). How well they are working you may check out for music – Last.Fm (www.last.fm), for movies – Netflix (www.netflix.com).
Robin Good's comment, October 14, 2012 9:12 AM
Thank you for clarifying this and having provided these useful references.
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Going Meta: Content Curation Techniques in Action by Robin Good

Here is a great example of how Robin Good Curates.  He noticed this video that Howard Rheingold has spotted.  Howard was curating it because of the focus on concept maps and creating insights.    Howard wrote:

 

(Video) Concept mapping with a group can be a powerful exercise in augmenting collective intelligence -- Howard

 

 

"An animated presentation about concept mapping. Focuses on how groups can employ the technique as a tool for collaborative planning and problem solving".

 

Now, go look at how Robin curated this video.  He did NOT just do a re-scoop.

 

Here's what he did:

 

1.)  Viewed the video to see how it relates to his scoop.it on curation and indicated the exact part of the five-minute video that explains content curation

 

2)  He retitled his scoop to support his point - that the making information into knowledge is what the curator does.

 

3)  He thanked the curator who originally found the clip - gave attribution to the person selected it.

 

 

http://curation.masternewmedia.org/p/2214228953/content-curation-from-information-to-knowledge-video?_tmc=qgpFTf6P-j0OG9yUhKbmoh2kBA1BuwWogZjsBN-aSwU

 

 

 

 


Via Howard Rheingold, Beth Kanter
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Robin Good's comment, July 23, 2012 1:18 AM
Thanks Beth.

P.S.: A possible overlook "he did simply do a re-scoop"
Beth Kanter's comment, July 23, 2012 2:31 PM
Hi Robin, thanks for catching that! Sort of a funny typo, don't you think? That is the essence of what you did - you didn't just click a button - you added value for your audiences. Thanks again for being a great role model for all of us who want to learn better curation skills.
Robin Good's comment, July 23, 2012 4:04 PM
Thank you Beth, for going "meta" and showing the process. Great move. Great job.
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Pinteresti.st

Pinteresti.st | Curate THIS! | Scoop.it

This strikes me as funny:  a curated grid of curated grid web sites.  The content is reduced to something close to a pure texture, which is, in some way, soothing.

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