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Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital
Curaduria de contenidos para seleccionar. Preservacion para conservar el patrimonio digital.
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Collector or Curator? Becoming a Social Connoisseur

Collector or Curator? Becoming a Social Connoisseur | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it
It used to be that you were a wine or art collector to be considered a connoisseur. These curators of their personal taste and beauty would search for pieces that fit a collection they would be proud
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Credit and Attribution Are Fantastic Untapped Resources for Discovery, Not Duties: Maria Popova and The Curator's Code

Credit and Attribution Are Fantastic Untapped Resources for Discovery, Not Duties: Maria Popova and The Curator's Code | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Maria Popova has just launched a classy and laudable initiative, focused on increasing awareness and in highlighting the importance of honoring always where or via who you have got to a certain article, report, video or image.

 

Credit and attribution are not just a "formal" way to comply with rules, laws and authors but an incredibly powerful emebddable mechanism to augment findability, discovery, sinergy and collaboration among human being interested in the same topic.

 

She writes: "In an age of information overload, information discovery — the service of bringing to the public’s attention that which is interesting, meaningful, important, and otherwise worthy of our time and thought — is a form of creative and intellectual labor, and one of increasing importance and urgency.

 

A form of authorship, if you will.

 

Yet we don’t have a standardized system for honoring discovery the way we honor other forms of authorship and other modalities of creative and intellectual investment, from literary citations to Creative Commons image rights."

 

For this purpose Curator's Code was created.

 

Curator's Code is first of all "a movement to honor and standardize attribution of discovery across the web" as well as a web site where you can learn about the two key types of attribution that we should be using:

a) Via - which indicates a link of direct discovery

b) Hat tip - Indicates a link of indirect discovery, story lead, or inspiration.

 

Each one has now a peculiar characterizing icon that Curator's Code suggests to integrate in your news and content publication policies. 

 

Additionally and to make it easy for anyone to integrate these new attribution icons in their work, Curator's Code has created a free bokkmarklet which makes using proper attribution a matter of one clic.

 

Hat tip to Maria Popova and Curator's Code for launching this initiative. 

 

Whether or not you will sign Curator's Code pledge, become an official web site supporting it, or adopt its bookmarklet instantly is not as important as the key idea behind it: by providing credit and attribution to pieces of content you find elsewhere, you not only honestly reward who has spent time to create that content, but you significantly boost the opportunity for thousands of others to connect, link up to, discover and make greater sense of their search for meaning.

 

Read Maria Popova introductory article to Curator's Code: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/03/09/curators-code/ ;

 

How to use the Curator's bookmarklet: http://vimeo.com/38243275 ;

 

Healthy. Inspiring. 9/10

 

Curator's Code official web site: http://curatorscode.org/ ;

 

N.B.: Too bad that the Curator's Code bookmarklet doesn't work with Scoop.it, as the one excludes the other. But you could save the two codes for the special attribution characters in a text note and copy and paste whicever you need. Given the need for simplicity and integration this is not an ideal solution but I am sure that between Maria and Guillaume at Scoop.it they will find a way to make this work easily for all. Maria and Guillaume: what do you say?

 


Via Robin Good
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Beth Kanter's comment, March 11, 2012 10:01 AM
Thanks Robin for sharing and curating this article with your summary. I discovered it via Barbara Bray's collection where she had re scooped your scoop -- [and if following the curator's code added a via]. I came over here to rescoop (with a via!) because you are the original source and one of the links was broken (you corrected it and added an update) thus reminding me the importance of going to the original source. Here on scoop.it you can just follow the trail of the rescoop icon.

I am disappointed that the bookmarklet doesn't work together with the scoop.it one - but it would be great to have it integrated. Now to figure out how to rescoop it with the characters.
Robin Good's comment, March 11, 2012 10:12 AM
Hi Beth, thanks for your kind feedback. I was just out today for a video interview with Nancy White here in Rome, and she mentioned you as someone she likes for your ability to curate and make sense of things.

Re the integration of the curators' code icons, I have received feedback from Guillaume De Cugies of Scoop.it that he has been exchanging with Maria Popova and that he is looking with her for a way to integrate the two.

For now you can simply install the Curators' Code bookmarklet and use the "via"<a href="http://www.curatorscode.org" target="_blank" style="font-family:sans-serif;text-decoration:none" >&#x1525;</a> or hat tip <a href="http://www.curatorscode.org" target="_blank" style="font-family:sans-serif;text-decoration:none" >&#x21ac;</a> icons by copying and pasting their code into your scoops manually. The problem, at least for me is, that the scoop.it editing window is in the same position where the Curators' Code bookmarklet is and therefore I can't see both at the same time.

In any case I think it would be trivial for Scoop.it or any other tool to integrate such buttons directly into their system without having us to use two different tools for one task.
Karen Dietz's comment, March 11, 2012 6:36 PM
Many thanks Robin for the help! Somehow I missed the article -- computer fatigue probably :) I read it earlier today and look forward to using the codes. I'm thrilled to hear that scoop.it is looking into integrating them into the platform. Thanks for keeping us updated on this new, and important twist, for curating. Cheers -- Karen
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Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research]

Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research] | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it

Robin Good: The Institute for the Future and the University of Phoenix have teamed up to produce, this past spring, an interesting report entitled Future Work Skills 2020.

 

By looking at the set of emerging skills that this research identifies as vital for future workers, I can't avoid but recognize the very skillset needed by any professional curator or newsmaster.

 

It should only come as a limited surprise to realize that in an information economy, the most valuable skills are those that can harness that primary resource, "information", in new, and immediately useful ways.

 

And being the nature of information like water, which can adapt and flow depending on context, the task of the curator is one of seeing beyond the water,

to the unique rare fish swimming through it.

 

The curator's key talent being the one of recognizing that depending on who you are fishing for, the kind of fish you and other curators could see within the same water pool, may be very different. 

 

 

Here the skills that information-fishermen of the future will need the most:

 

1) Sense-making:

ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed

 

2) Social intelligence:

ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions

 

3) Novel and adaptive thinking:

proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based

 

4) Cross-cultural competency:

ability to operate in different cultural settings

 

5) Computational thinking:

ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning

 

6) New media literacy:

ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication

 

7) Transdisciplinarity:

literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines

 

8) Design mindset:

ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes

 

9) Cognitive load management:

ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques

 

10) Virtual collaboration:

ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team

 

 

Critical to understand the future ahead. 9/10

 

Curated by Robin Good

 

Executive Summary of the Report: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-work-skills-executive-summary.pdf&nbsp;

 

Download a PDF copy of Future Work Skills 2020: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-skills-2020-research-report.pdf&nbsp;&nbsp;


Via Robin Good, janlgordon
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Karen du Toit's comment, December 20, 2011 5:55 AM
Thanks! Great info!
Beth Kanter's comment, December 20, 2011 4:34 PM
Thanks for sharing this from Robin's stream. These skills sets could form the basis of a self-assessment for would-be curators, although they're more conceptual - than practical/tactical. Thanks for sharing and must go rescoop it with a credit you and Robin of course
janlgordon's comment, December 20, 2011 4:56 PM
Beth Kanter
Agreed. It's also one of the articles I told you about....good info to build on:-)
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Snip.it New Curation Tool Could Be A Fierce Competitor To Delicious

About the Author: Drew Olanoff is The Next Web's West Coast Editor.

 

Intro:

 

With all of the information out on the web that you share everyday, curation is becoming a hot space. ReadWriteWeb reports on a new service founded by former TellMe senior engineer Ramy Adeeb.

 

Just because this is a hot space, doesn’t mean it’s not overcrowded though. We’ve reported on quite a few services like this, but Snip.it might take the lead in pure design and experience. It’s beautifully done.

 

Snip.it, first of all, is a great name for the service.

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

The idea of “snipping” parts of the web to save for yourself or to share with a group of people is something even my Mom can understand. As I’ve mentioned,

 

**making sure a service is something not just geeks will get is the key to something sustainable.

 

http://tnw.co/oxnKVl

 


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The curator's filters

It's clear that content curation is increasingly being talked about as an important role for learning professionals (in the context of self-provisioned learning, scaffolding, learing environment de...
Alejandro Tortolini's insight:

Sobre las responsabilidades del curador de contenidos.

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Curation Tools That Help You Find Hidden Gems That Nobody Else Is Posting

Rob Diana writes: "The core of my concern is that curators need tools to find those stories that may not be as popular as others.

Otherwise, all news comes from a few select sites that are read by the masses. Obviously, this is not what we want to have happen."

 

He couldn't be more right. 

The rest of his article, dating back to November, offers good insight into what the 1% of former Google Reader was really doing and what they are looking for now that it is gone.

 

Insightful. 8/10

 

Curated and Selected by by Robin Good

 

 

Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/tCbIPj]


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janlgordon's comment, December 18, 2011 11:57 AM
Hi Robin,
This is a good one - thanks for sharing this!!
Jan
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Great Content Curation Models: E-learning Examples by David Anderson

Great Content Curation Models: E-learning Examples by David Anderson | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it

If you are looking for inspiration when it comes to content curation, here is a great example at work.

 

Elearning Examples is a curated collection of "examples" from the real world of online communications in the areas of "multimedia journalism", "infographics" and "html5" among others.

For each one of these categories the author has written and edited a specific information card containing relevant information, images and links to the work being referenced.

 

 

Look: http://elearningexamples.com/ 

 

David Anderson's blog: http://multimedialearning.com/ 

 

His Twitter channel: https://twitter.com/#!/elearning 

 

(Reviewed by Robin Good)


Via Robin Good, janlgordon, Angel Sobrino
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