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Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital
Curaduria de contenidos para seleccionar. Preservacion para conservar el patrimonio digital.
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Curating People is As Important as Curating Content - Here's Why

Curating People is As Important as Curating Content - Here's Why | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it

I curated and posted this a few months ago but feel it's relevant and timely today. (What brought this to mind was another important article written by Axel Schultze, which I have commented on below.

 

Here's what I said about Gideon Rosenblatt's post.

 

This is one of those gems that I love to share. It was written by Gideon Rosenblatt in response to an earlier article written by Eli Pariser, "The Filter Bubble", which is about the way algorithms (based on our personal searches) affect the results that are returned to us, as a result, we're not seeing the whole picture.

 

"Computer algorithms aren't the only thing contributing to the 'Internet Filter Bubble."

 

**In the world of the information networker, curating content is only half the game. The other half is curating the curators.

 

**In that power to choose our connections, rests our ultimate power to reshape our information filter bubbles and radically improve our perception of reality.

 

**Who we choose to connect with in our social networks deeply affects our ability to see a diversity of information.  

 

My takeaway from this is that whereas technology may restrict the results returned to us by search engines, the other, and perhaps more important half of the equation is controlled by us!  It is well documented that we are more likely to influenced by our circle of friends and associates than by anything else that we may find (or that may find us!). 

 

By effectively curating our circles of influence, we increase the value of this ever important means of discovery and therefore of our entire online experience. 

 

**This in turn can make us far more effective and informative consumers as well as curators, when we widen our own circles.

 

Great article by Axel Schultze CEO of xee.me

 

"Why SEO will Be Gone in 5 to 10 Years" as he talks about "Relationships and Recommendations Soon More Valuable Than SEO" (Robin Good)

 

Jan Gordon: "Here's what caught my attention:

 

Axel: As long as people search for a product not knowing their name or a technology, not knowing its source or a solution not knowing who is a potential supplier SEO is an important part of the marketing mix...

 

However, this is slowly and steadily changing.

 

**Today 60 – 80% of the so called educated purchase decision is based on recommendations by trusted individuals or groups that have no or no significant interest in the sale but helpful and experienced people using or knowing the product or service in need.

 

And the number of recommendation based purchases is steadily growing. I'm sure it will hit the 80 – 90% range in the next 5 to 10 years.

 

Now – what does that mean to SEO?

 

Why should a business invest in search engine optimization if most of the purchase decisions are based on recommendations?

 

Wouldn't it be smarter to invest into the "recommendation chain" instead in SEO?

 

Wouldn't it be more effective and successful to make sure people recommend a product than hoping to come up higher in the list of search results?"

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read the full article: http://bit.ly/AxRrEr

 

Via janlgordon

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Image by Istockphoto  from an article by Social Media Examiner

 

Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/AxRrEr]


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janlgordon's comment, March 15, 2012 5:05 PM
Gideon.Rosenblatt
You made my day! I always love reading and curating your articles this was definitely no exception. Thank you for always raising the bar and making us pay attention to what's really important.
janlgordon's comment, June 17, 2012 12:53 PM
Thank you for this Robin, it's greatly appreciated. It's exciting to watch and be a part of all this change, I'm sure you agree:-)
Robin Good's comment, June 17, 2012 11:28 PM
Yes Jan... I don't know exactly what you are referring to, but this the only sure thing we have today: this is time of fast and continuous change... so I am certainly enjoying the ride.

On another note: I would humbly suggest to consider posting shorter stories, especially when you are also pointing to the original, as what I am looking for from you, is not a rehash of what's in the article - outside of a 1-3 para excerpt - but the reasons why you are recommending it. You are already doing both, but it is overwhelming for me. Too much stuff, and I haven't even seen the original yet.

I would also gently mute some of the visual noise you create by heavily formatting with asterisks, bolds and big font sizes. In my case that doesn't help much. It actually hinders my ability to rapidly scan and check whether you have something good there.

I suggest to limit greatly the formatting options you use and to highlight only what is really relevant, because when too many things are highlighted, bolded, asterisked, none has any more an effect on me. It's like a crowd screaming: who do you help? :-)
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5 Best Practices Every Content Curator Should Follow

5 Best Practices Every Content Curator Should Follow | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it

I selected this piece by Steve Rosenbaum for Mashable because there are some excellent tips to make you a trusted source, build a loyal following and add value to the community.

 

I don't know about you but everytime I read a post about curation, I see something different, this one is from someone who knows what he's talking about.

 

Here are some highlights:

 

Be part of the content ecosystem

 

**What a curator should do is embrace content both as a marketer and an organizer

 

Follow a schedule

 

**No matter what and how much you post, 2 new links a day and one big post per week, that's a schedule

 

**Be consistent and post at the same time everyday so your readers will know when to expect new content

 

**consistency and regularity brings new users and helps you build a loyal fan base

 

Embrace multi platforms

 

**Put your work where your audience is, today you have to go to them (more about this in the article)

 

Engage and Participate

 

**Select only the best content - read everything before you hit the send button - you'll build trust by helping your readers find great content and information

 

**This is a great way to build relationships with bloggers and other curators (more on this in the article)

 

Share, Don't Steal

 

**Last but definitely not least, you must acknowledge the source, there are no exceptions

 

**When people choose to listen to you, it's because you've proven to separate the signal from the noise

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://on.mash.to/Jk8uWH]


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janlgordon's comment, April 29, 2012 3:06 PM
Hi John, It's funny, we can read these articles over and over but I always find something new each time I read them. How about you?
John van den Brink's comment, April 29, 2012 11:50 PM
Hi Jan, correct. Everytime I think "oh, I know already" But when I read the article I always find one or two things that I didn't knew already :)
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To Pinterest, A Love Letter

To Pinterest, A Love Letter | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it

This wonderful piece was written by Lisa Barone on Outspoken Media. I loved reading this because her insights are right on the money. How do I know? Because I've been on Pinterest for a week and this social network takes you beyond all the buzzwords, the how to articles and lets you connect with others in ways that have the potential to create deeper engagement that can is definitely beginning to show ROI in more ways than one.

 

Feel free to follow me on Pinterest at  http://pinterest.com/jangordon/

 

or visit my topic on content curation at http://www.scoop.it/t/content-curation-social-media

 

Here's an excerpt that captures the essence of what she is saying. I highly recommend you read the comments as well.

 

Excerpt:

 

"Anyone who knows me will tell you: I’m completely commitment phobic. And nowhere is this more apparent than in the world of emerging social media networks. I cringe whenever a new one is released because I simply Can’t.

 

"For me, the social network doing that right now is Pinterest.Wait? Pinterest? Is that really anything more than an outlet for pictures of sleeping cats, fancy home décor and items deemed orange?

 

It is.

 

I’ll tell you why I love it and why, as a brand, you should love it too.

 

****One of the great things social media has done is that it’s undeniably changed the way businesses and consumers are able to interact.

 

****It broke through an imaginary wall that had long divided the two and allowed businesses to share parts of themselves which, in turn, allowed consumers to seek out businesses that are weird in the same way or that believed in the same things.

 

Last November I spoke at TEDx about how through the Web, weird became profitable.

 

****Weird became something businesses could leverage. To me, that’s where social media is most effective –

 

****when businesses use weird to be strategically authentic and show customers their essence. It’s when they let certain parts of themselves hang out so their customers can get to know whose behind the product or service that they love so much.

 

And that’s what Pinterest does really well. It epitomizes what is right and powerful in social media. Sure, Mashable may still use it to hoard marketing infographics for page views, but that’s not how it’s most effective.


**Pinterest works best when brands show customers what’s going on below the surface".

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Pinterest Watch"

 

Read full article here: [http://outspokenmedia.com/about/lisa-barone/]


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janlgordon's comment, January 12, 2012 9:07 PM
maxOz
Thank you for this wonderful post on Pinterest!
maxOz's comment, January 12, 2012 9:12 PM
I love it as well, glad you enjoyed it x Michele
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What is Content Curation?

What is Content Curation? | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it
I selected this piece by Dino Joannides for Lingospot because it tackles a much asked and frequently tackled answered of "What is Curation?" in the most appropriate manner possible. That is to say, he answers the question with an excellent example of curation, complete with multiple links to articles that prove his points.

 

Some points that caught my attention:

 

**Content curation means different things to a variety of stakeholders, be they journalists, editors, bloggers, business executives or marketers.

 

**Fred Wilson the Venture Capitalist and blogger sees curation as an essential element in today's media landscape as indicated by one of his posts here

.

**Some argue that curation could actually save media.

 

**Others have argued that there is a new type of curation that is in effect the New Search.

 

**Most people inadvertently already act as curators whenever they decide to post a link or video to their social networks to show their friends they have found great or topical content.

 

He closes by suggesting traditional editors make decisions based only upon content that was produced internally, whereas the newer Curation mixes this with external content. The determination of what is given prominence remains the same.

 

The difference is that now, this role is undertaken by professional journalists, content marketers, bloggers" or in reality, anyone that publishes online".

 

What do you think?

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article: [http://bit.ly/w81bwP]


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Robin Good's comment, January 20, 2012 9:49 AM
Thank you Jan, excellent work, as always.
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Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research]

Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research] | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it

Robin Good: The Institute for the Future and the University of Phoenix have teamed up to produce, this past spring, an interesting report entitled Future Work Skills 2020.

 

By looking at the set of emerging skills that this research identifies as vital for future workers, I can't avoid but recognize the very skillset needed by any professional curator or newsmaster.

 

It should only come as a limited surprise to realize that in an information economy, the most valuable skills are those that can harness that primary resource, "information", in new, and immediately useful ways.

 

And being the nature of information like water, which can adapt and flow depending on context, the task of the curator is one of seeing beyond the water,

to the unique rare fish swimming through it.

 

The curator's key talent being the one of recognizing that depending on who you are fishing for, the kind of fish you and other curators could see within the same water pool, may be very different. 

 

 

Here the skills that information-fishermen of the future will need the most:

 

1) Sense-making:

ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed

 

2) Social intelligence:

ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions

 

3) Novel and adaptive thinking:

proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based

 

4) Cross-cultural competency:

ability to operate in different cultural settings

 

5) Computational thinking:

ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning

 

6) New media literacy:

ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication

 

7) Transdisciplinarity:

literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines

 

8) Design mindset:

ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes

 

9) Cognitive load management:

ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques

 

10) Virtual collaboration:

ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team

 

 

Critical to understand the future ahead. 9/10

 

Curated by Robin Good

 

Executive Summary of the Report: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-work-skills-executive-summary.pdf 

 

Download a PDF copy of Future Work Skills 2020: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-skills-2020-research-report.pdf  


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Karen du Toit's comment, December 20, 2011 5:55 AM
Thanks! Great info!
Beth Kanter's comment, December 20, 2011 4:34 PM
Thanks for sharing this from Robin's stream. These skills sets could form the basis of a self-assessment for would-be curators, although they're more conceptual - than practical/tactical. Thanks for sharing and must go rescoop it with a credit you and Robin of course
janlgordon's comment, December 20, 2011 4:56 PM
Beth Kanter
Agreed. It's also one of the articles I told you about....good info to build on:-)
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The Best Tools for Content Curation - Digital Inspiration

The Best Tools for Content Curation - Digital Inspiration | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it

The author of this piece is Amit Agarwal is a personal technology columnist and founder of Digital Inspiration, one of the most widely read how-to blogs in the world

 

Good information here........

 

 

Intro:

 

A content curation tool lets you pull videos, images, presentations, tweets, blog posts and other web content into a bundle which you can then easily embed and share on the web.

 

Let’s say your team has just launched a new product at some conference and they have asked you to collate all the conversations and buzz happening around that product on various websites, blogs and social sites.

 

You have to act fast because the stuff that gets shared on the real-time web often gets buried almost as quickly.

 

So how should you go about collecting stuff around the Internet? Should you just save everything that’s being said to your browser bookmarks? Or maybe put all the web clippings in an Excel sheet as that would be easy to share? Or how about capturing screenshot images of the chatter?

 

 

There are umpteen ways to do this but what you should really look at is a dedicated content curation tool that is designed to capture web content with minimal effort.

 

http://www.labnol.org/internet/best-content-curation-tools/20164/


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Why Human Filters are the Future of the Web

Why Human Filters are the Future of the Web | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it

Karyn Campbell wrote this piece for Sparksheet - Great Observations and so true!

 

Intro:

 

"Before news aggregators, content curators, and Google’s omnipotent algorithm, the world’s information was sorted by real human beings."

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

It comes down to trust

 

The web has offered us incredible options for how we buy products, talk to our friends, or experience media. Remember that adage “quality over quantity”? We can take that phrase literally online – quantity won’t go away; quality will just sit atop.

 

Sometimes we want someone to tell us, consistently, what’s true and what’s good. No wonder YouTube just relaunched its music page, enlisting writers for Vice, Spin and other major vloggers to curate its featured content.

 

**As Steve Jobs more radically put it, “It’s not the consumers’ job to know what they want.”

 

It comes down to trust. Because we are all so well trained in the art of branding, arguably at the expense of crafting things worthy of distribution,

 

**it becomes hard to trust the advice of a Wild West web.

 

Still, we’ll continue to take the word of our favourite industry insider, celebrity or uncle.

 

**Likewise, the smartest companies in this space will calibrate expertise with automation, math with emotion.

 

**Whether she’s a kid writing code or a poet in-the-making, look for the next generation Steve Jobs to carry on building, hiring, and perfecting these filters.

 

Absolutely!

 

http://sparksheet.com/return-of-the-editor-why-human-filters-are-the-future-of-the-web/


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Snip.it New Curation Tool Could Be A Fierce Competitor To Delicious

About the Author: Drew Olanoff is The Next Web's West Coast Editor.

 

Intro:

 

With all of the information out on the web that you share everyday, curation is becoming a hot space. ReadWriteWeb reports on a new service founded by former TellMe senior engineer Ramy Adeeb.

 

Just because this is a hot space, doesn’t mean it’s not overcrowded though. We’ve reported on quite a few services like this, but Snip.it might take the lead in pure design and experience. It’s beautifully done.

 

Snip.it, first of all, is a great name for the service.

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

The idea of “snipping” parts of the web to save for yourself or to share with a group of people is something even my Mom can understand. As I’ve mentioned,

 

**making sure a service is something not just geeks will get is the key to something sustainable.

 

http://tnw.co/oxnKVl

 


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58 Surfire Ways to Curate or Create Persuasive Content Your Audience Will Love

58 Surfire Ways to Curate or Create Persuasive Content Your Audience Will Love | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it

I selected this post by copyblogger because this is one of those pieces you can read once but it really comes to life when you're writing that article, blog post, curating someone elses piece. There are so many valuable insights and suggestions, it's definitely worth reading and keeping for those days when you need creative inspiration.

 

Here are a few things that caught my attention:

 

*GREAT CURATORS Understand your readers. Know their fears, dreams, and desires. How can you engage with someone you don’t understand?

 

**Don’t write for a large audience. Choose one person, picture him, and write to him as if he’s a friend.

 

**Use a conversational tone of voice. Nobody wants to chat with a company.

 

**Be engaging. Using the word you is the most powerful way to be more engaging.

 

Be remarkable. So much content is out there, how can you stand out?

 

**GREAT Creation or Curation comes from CONTEXT Disclose your point of view, tell your personal story, and develop your own voice.

 

**If your readers feel they know you, they will connect with you.

 

**Use familiar language. Check Twitter, Facebook or Google’s Keyword Tool – and find the wording your readers use.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Marketing and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/HQj1vl]


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Beth Kanter's comment, May 27, 2012 10:57 AM
I love this post - thanks for finding
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SXSW and The Curators Debate: The Curators and the Curated

A great curated story by Guillaume De Cugis of Scoop.it who has nicely synthesized the topics discussed yesterday at SXSW with Maria Popova (BrainPickings), David Carr (the New York Times), Mia Quagliarello (Flipboard) and Noah Brier (Percolate). Moderated by Max Linsky (longform.org). See also the sketchnote at : http://blog.fueledbycoffee.com/tagged/sxswcurate


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Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm?

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm? | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Evren Kiefer for Paper.li talking about a challenge we all face - information overload and how we streamline our diet. Or can we?

 

"Content doesn't have a season -- the feast is all year round" Overload or gluttony?

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

“Information overload”, I hear you say, “we know that already”. Is it really the problem, though?

 

**As Clay Shirky argues in his talk “It’s Not Information Overload. It’s Filter Failure”, information overload is our new environment of plenty and not a problem that needs solving.

 

****It lies upon us to create internal and external filters to manage our time and attention because they are our most precious resources.

 

My commentary: I think this is most important for all of us, continually refining our ability to select only what we need and leave the rest. Today everyone is a publisher and everyone has an opinion. Aren't we suffering from meaning overwhelm as well?

 

I think it's essential to establish some criteria when you select content?

 

**What are you  looking to add to the original piece?

 

**Do you want to  create  clarity for others?

 

**Do you know the subject matter well enough to do this effectively?

 

**Do you want it to be thought-provoking?

 

**Do you want to add additional links and other resources who may have different points of view?.

 

As far as meaning overwhelm,

 

Everyone has an opinion, I think it's good to have a viewpoint but I think it's important to search for the simple thread in it that relates to your core message. 

 

It's also good to include others in the conversation because two heads are better than one, it helps people see the bigger picture and decide for themselves. That's why I'm asking you:

 

What are your thoughts? How are you dealing with this? I'd love to hear your comments.

 

Selected by Howard Rhinegold and  Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond

 

Read Full article here: [http://bit.ly/wkij56]


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Beth Kanter's comment, January 21, 2012 10:20 AM
BTW, I like how you frame the "meaning overwhelm." Even if we are power users of aggregation tools and newsmastering tools to bring us more on target content for our needs - we can still suffer from this.

It is the act of going back and forth between scanning quickly - and then going in for a deep dive and reflection. I watch the stream. I check things out and if I find something that is like "wow" - my audience would love this - or "wow" slightly different take or framing on the topic - then I add in my collection,think about it, and share.

The thing I'm trying to fight - in part because I curate many different topics. I tend to focus on different streams of keywords or sources for particular topics. But I might find something through serendipity that is on another topic I curate and it is good, but I'm not focusing on that topic now. So, sometimes I grab and have in a holding place until I look at it in more depth.

All this to ask you about:
What is your practice for curating multiple topics?
What do YOU do to avoid meaning overload?
janlgordon's comment, January 21, 2012 2:06 PM
Beth Kanter

For me, it all begins with managing my attention and establishing criteria for selecting content that aligns with my brand message and my purpose for being online. This is my compass. My focus for the day that fits this framework and everything flows from there. I love Howard Rhinegold’s work and the mindmap is brilliant. I’m finding these to be excellent resources in helping me to refine this process and I feel I'm definitely on the right track.


I have some quiet time before I ever go to the computer and focus on my agenda for the day. It’s like going into a library. Everything you could ever want is there but if you don’t have a hypothesis, you can drown in the sea of knowledge and information.

I cover lots of topics but there’s a recurring theme that connects them and it revolves around the evolving world of curation and the many forms it takes; how we have to learn to curate our selection not only of content and information but activity such as social networking as well. It's learning to manage my time and evaluate how I spend it. I ask myself if I do this, will it take me towards or away from my overall plan, the answer always gets me back to where I need to be.

As you know, we can schedule priorities and life comes charging in and sometimes I have to shift to do something that needs to be taken care of. Even if this happens, I can get back to my theme for the day at some point. I don't hold the reigns too tightly on this, it's just there to keep me grounded. If I find something as you say serendipitously and it’s off my daily plan, if it’s really a "wow", (again, here I've established some criteria for this, otherwise, I'd find many wows throughout the day), I stop and pay attention to it to see if it’s something I should work on. For me, there’s a certain rhythm to all of this and intuition plays a part. It takes practice and trusting yourself and not over-thinking things.

As for meaning overload, there are two things I will do If a piece is particularly heady or difficult to read, I will search for the simple thread that relates to the message I am seeking to put out to my audience. The other aspect is more simple. If I feel that my head is just too full, I have to step away for a few minutes, take a few deep breaths, maybe grab a drink of water. Sometimes meaning overload is just brain overload, and I really need to know when to step away and find my way back.
Kelly Hungerford's comment, January 22, 2012 2:16 AM
Thanks for sharing, Howard.
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Curation Tools That Help You Find Hidden Gems That Nobody Else Is Posting

Rob Diana writes: "The core of my concern is that curators need tools to find those stories that may not be as popular as others.

Otherwise, all news comes from a few select sites that are read by the masses. Obviously, this is not what we want to have happen."

 

He couldn't be more right. 

The rest of his article, dating back to November, offers good insight into what the 1% of former Google Reader was really doing and what they are looking for now that it is gone.

 

Insightful. 8/10

 

Curated and Selected by by Robin Good

 

 

Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/tCbIPj]


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janlgordon's comment, December 18, 2011 11:57 AM
Hi Robin,
This is a good one - thanks for sharing this!!
Jan
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Great Content Curation Models: E-learning Examples by David Anderson

Great Content Curation Models: E-learning Examples by David Anderson | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it

If you are looking for inspiration when it comes to content curation, here is a great example at work.

 

Elearning Examples is a curated collection of "examples" from the real world of online communications in the areas of "multimedia journalism", "infographics" and "html5" among others.

For each one of these categories the author has written and edited a specific information card containing relevant information, images and links to the work being referenced.

 

 

Look: http://elearningexamples.com/ 

 

David Anderson's blog: http://multimedialearning.com/ 

 

His Twitter channel: https://twitter.com/#!/elearning 

 

(Reviewed by Robin Good)


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Best Thinkers Series: Is Curation the New Journalism?

If you're serious about content curation or just want to know more about it, you shouldn't miss this.......

 

An exclusive, live webinar from Social Media Today

 

October 4th at 12pm EST / 9am PST

 

Where journalists used to be the trusted agents for reporting on the ground and fact-checking stories before publication, every Web user is now a potential journalist.

 

And as the deluge of user-generated information gathers strength, finding out what's important to people in their private and working lives becomes more and more challenging. How to sort between truth, half truth and falsehood?

 

Technical filtering can't (yet) match human capacity to discriminate between useful content and garbage. This is the increasingly vital role of the online curator. The discussion will examine to what extent curation is becoming integral to journalism, and whether bloggers and tweeters can adequately play the the reporting role of journalists.

 

We'll cover the following questions, as well as your own:

 

What's the difference between curation and journalism? How does factchecking work in the blogosphere? What are emerging best practices for online curators?

 

Can the hive mind of the Internet match the formal editorial structure of a traditional news organization when it comes to producing accurate reporting and analysis of current events?

 

Maggie Fox will host the webinar, her wonderful guests are Steve Rosenbaum and Tom Foremeski. (Bios on the article)

 

http://socialmediatoday.com/is-curation-the-new-journalism?reference=smt_twitter


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Thoora: The Intersection of Aggregation, Search & Curation

Thoora: The Intersection of Aggregation, Search & Curation | Curaduria de contenidos y Preservacion digital | Scoop.it

This is a great tool for curators!

 

Intro:

 

"With a Web full of stuff, discovery is a hard problem. Search engines were the first tools on the scene, but their rankings still have a hard time identifying relevance the same way a human user would."

 

Excerpt:

 

Digging For Content

 

Thoora was founded in 2008, and it originally launched as a real-time news aggregator, which we covered back in 2009. But this new iteration is about much more than scanning the news.

 

This is a toolkit for users to explore and research topics, and it learns more about them as its users sort out what matters to them. It is a social tool - users can share topics, and the Thoora site features highlights - but the purpose of the tool is to turn up the most relevant content on the topic, no matter how deeply it's buried in the Web.

 

"We like to say that we're at the intersection of aggregation, curation and search," says Carrie Shaw, head of product at Thoora. As far as users are concerned, that's a good description, but the real value of Thoora comes from the learning algorithms at work behind the scenes. As users create topics, discover content and clean up the results, the Thoora engine gets better at recommendations.

 

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/thoora.php


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