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Rescooped by Christine Heine from Teaching + Learning + Policy
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35 Psychology-Based Learning Strategies For Deeper Learning

35 Psychology-Based Learning Strategies For Deeper Learning | Cuppa | Scoop.it

"Have you ever considered letting your students listen to hardcore punk while they take their mid-term exam? Decided to do away with Power Point presentations during your lectures? Urged your students to memorize more in order to remember more? If the answer is no, you may want to rethink your notions of psychology and its place in the learning environment. Here are 35 critical thinking strategies, straight from the mind of Sigmund Freud." | by Sara Briggs


Via Todd Reimer
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Rescooped by Christine Heine from eLearning
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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Cuppa | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.

 

Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good, João Greno Brogueira, Amanda McAndrew, THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*, LaiaJoana, Rui Guimarães Lima, Ramon Aragon, Paulo Simões
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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?

Rescooped by Christine Heine from Engagement Based Teaching and Learning
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The 7 Styles of Online Learning

The 7 Styles of Online Learning | Cuppa | Scoop.it

Visual, aural, verbal, physical, logical, social, solitary. As an online educator, teacher, consultant, facilitator you probably wonder what kind of the 7 styles of learning are the most effective for your audience. Here's an overview. 


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, January 3, 2013 11:26 PM

I think most of us are a nice and nifty package of all.  Preferences vary, depending on many factors. 

Ruth Garner's curator insight, January 5, 2013 6:35 AM

It is always good to revisit learning styles in order to reflect on whether or not we are giving the best opportunities for learning online.

Rescooped by Christine Heine from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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What 100 Experts Think About The Future Of Learning

What 100 Experts Think About The Future Of Learning | Cuppa | Scoop.it
If you’re an educator, surely you know that technology has and will continue to have an incredible impact on learning.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Christine Heine from Engagement Based Teaching and Learning
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My Voice National Student Report 2012:


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, February 4, 2013 6:27 AM

My Voice provides educators with a powerful tool for understanding both what motivates and inspires students to achieve, and how well students believe their school is meeting those objectives. My Voice is a powerful tool for initiating innovative, meaningful school reform.  

 

Global summary:  

 

Student-teacher relationships, which can be powerful contributors to student engagement
and academic success, are in need of improvement; moreover, perceptions of studentteacher relationships appear to weaken, rather than strengthen, through the middle school
and into the high school years.
– At all levels of secondary education, students need to be more engaged—and trends across
the grade levels suggest this problem gets worse, not better, the longer students are in
school; and
– While learning in school in general is perceived as important, it is not perceived as
particularly relevant to many students’ lives, and this perceived relevance generally declines
as students progress through school.

 

This document needs to be read and read well for those looking to change the culture of their building.  

 

 

Rescooped by Christine Heine from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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The Lasting Impact of Instructional Coaching

The Lasting Impact of Instructional Coaching | Cuppa | Scoop.it

Cause-Effect Coaching

 

David uses a “cause-effect coaching” method.  He shows teachers what they are doing or are not doing (the cause) and how it is related to what the students are learning or not learning (the effect).

The purpose is to show the teacher that the students may not be the cause of why the students are not learning.

 

The cause-effect concept was shown in the original work on classroom management by Jacob Kounin.  He summarized his research from observing teachers and classrooms and concluded that it was “the behavior of the teacher and not the behavior of the students that resulted in student learning.”

 

David says, “School leaders and teachers must always examine how their actions or inactions may be creating barriers or creating enhancements to learning.”

 


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, Gust MEES
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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, January 17, 2013 11:32 PM

Learn more about cause-effect coaching.  If it doesn't last, it's just a distraction.  

Gust MEES's curator insight, January 20, 2013 4:57 PM

Very interesting, a MUST read...

 

Gianfranco D'Aversa's curator insight, January 23, 2013 1:59 PM

Cause-Effect Coaching

 

David uses a “cause-effect coaching” method.  He shows teachers what they are doing or are not doing (the cause) and how it is related to what the students are learning or not learning (the effect).

The purpose is to show the teacher that the students may not be the cause of why the students are not learning.

 

The cause-effect concept was shown in the original work on classroom management by Jacob Kounin.  He summarized his research from observing teachers and classrooms and concluded that it was “the behavior of the teacher and not the behavior of the students that resulted in student learning.”

 

David says:

 

==> “School leaders and teachers must always examine how their actions or inactions may be creating barriers or creating enhancements to learning.

Rescooped by Christine Heine from Engagement Based Teaching and Learning
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The Virtues of Daydreaming And 30 Other Surprising (And Controversial) Research Findings About How Students Learn

The Virtues of Daydreaming And 30 Other Surprising (And Controversial) Research Findings About How Students Learn | Cuppa | Scoop.it

Here is what appears to be an alternative take on what makes kids tick.  Love this article on engagement!  


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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