Culture Scotland
Follow
Find tag "language"
6.4K views | +0 today
Culture Scotland
Culture, the arts and creative industries in Scotland
Curated by Peter A Bell
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Peter A Bell
Scoop.it!

Dinnae haud yer wheesht ... team collating all languages on planet lands in Scotland

Dinnae haud yer wheesht ... team collating all languages on planet lands in Scotland | Culture Scotland | Scoop.it
THE plan is to collect and collate every single language on earth - whether it is spoken by billions or just a handful of people in some remote corner of the planet.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter A Bell
Scoop.it!

Government looks to double Gaelic learners

Government looks to double Gaelic learners | Culture Scotland | Scoop.it
A NEW Gaelic resource to encourage greater uptake of the language was launched at the Royal National Mod yesterday.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter A Bell
Scoop.it!

Knowing your place

Knowing your place | Culture Scotland | Scoop.it
When I was a child I was taught of a long-ago battle. It was a monumental battle, an invading army and a defending one, swords and shields, bows and arrows. The attackers were somehow both bad men ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter A Bell
Scoop.it!

Speakin oot for Scots

Speakin oot for Scots | Culture Scotland | Scoop.it

Lang syne acceptit as a ‘language’ by the Scottish an UK parliaments, oor heidmaist spoken minority leid aye has a want o status or e’en visability in education, the prent press (ootside o cartoons), in braidcastin, academia, science or in onie ither mensefu area.


Tho remainin a near ‘secret tongue’ Scots is spoken yet by hunders o thoosands o Scots. The census nummers will nae doot prove Scots is uised bi monie times the amoot of fowk spaekin Scotland’s ither minoritie leid, Gaelic.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter A Bell
Scoop.it!

Last of dialect's natives dies

Last of dialect's natives dies | Culture Scotland | Scoop.it
The last native speaker of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect in the Highlands has died at the age of 92.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter A Bell
Scoop.it!

Allan Massie: Gaelic will only be a hobby language

Allan Massie: Gaelic will only be a hobby language | Culture Scotland | Scoop.it
The indulgent pretence surrounding Gaelic does nothing to halt the language’s decline and amounts to intellectual dishonesty, writes Allan Massie
Peter A Bell's insight:

What a magnificently pointless rant! I can only assume that Mr Massie felt a pressing need to lance the boil of his curmudgeonly indignation. Quite why he should think others might benefit from witnessing this operation remains a mystery. But then, I've never understood the urge that drives people to flaunt their gross physical abnormalities in front of the TV cameras for an audience whose motives I find no less incomprehensible.

Don't get me wrong! I can do the grumpy old man thing along with the best of them. Get me started on the subject of dogs and dog-owners and you'll soon discover the truth of that. But I prefer to put my energies into railing against the injustices of the things people are denied or deprived of rather than the the things that enrich the lives of individuals and add something to our society.

I don't see anybody trying to pretend that Scotland is a bi-lingual nation. All I see is an important part of our culture being given the kind of prominence it needs in order to survive. If there is a cost to this then I, for one, am happy to pay what cannot be more than my infinitesimal share. I do not speak Gaelic, and have no particular personal interest in the language. By the same token, I do not play a musical instrument or enjoy the ballet, but I am content that public money should be spent supporting the teaching of music and the performance of ballet because I recognise that our culture is enhanced thereby and that it would necessarily be diminished were support for these things to be withdrawn.

It all comes down to ones concept of society. Whether one sees it as something external to you as an individual. Something which can only be added to by subtracting from the individual. Or whether one sees society as something that we are all part of. Something which connects us all such that, if one part gains, we all do.

I suspect Mr Massie tends to the former perspective. But I don't think that explains his issue with the way Gaelic is treated in Scotland. The clue to what really troubles him is to be found in his remarks about "national identity". While the semantics suggest an acknowledgement of "our distinct national identity", the tone clearly indicates resentment of the fact that this distinctiveness is more than merely acknowledged.

The tone is redolent of that narrow, jealous, supercilious British nationalism which perceives in the tokens and symbols of other national identities only a threat to its own integrity. A chauvinistic and exceptionalistic nationalism that is offended by the sight of the Saltire.

Gaelic is fine, so long as it knows its place. Just as Scotland is OK so long as it does not exhibit any pretension to be other than totally subsumed in a British identity.

more...
Peter A Bell's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:08 AM

What a magnificently pointless rant! I can only assume that Mr Massie felt a pressing need to lance the boil of his curmudgeonly indignation. Quite why he should think others might benefit from witnessing this operation remains a mystery. But then, I've never understood the urge that drives people to flaunt their gross physical abnormalities in front of the TV cameras for an audience whose motives I find no less incomprehensible.

Don't get me wrong! I can do the grumpy old man thing along with the best of them. Get me started on the subject of dogs and dog-owners and you'll soon discover the truth of that. But I prefer to put my energies into railing against the injustices of the things people are denied or deprived of rather than the the things that enrich the lives of individuals and add something to our society.

I don't see anybody trying to pretend that Scotland is a bi-lingual nation. All I see is an important part of our culture being given the kind of prominence it needs in order to survive. If there is a cost to this then I, for one, am happy to pay what cannot be more than my infinitesimal share. I do not speak Gaelic, and have no particular personal interest in the language. By the same token, I do not play a musical instrument or enjoy the ballet, but I am content that public money should be spent supporting the teaching of music and the performance of ballet because I recognise that our culture is enhanced thereby and that it would necessarily be diminished were support for these things to be withdrawn.

It all comes down to ones concept of society. Whether one sees it as something external to you as an individual. Something which can only be added to by subtracting from the individual. Or whether one sees society as something that we are all part of. Something which connects us all such that, if one part gains, we all do.

I suspect Mr Massie tends to the former perspective. But I don't think that explains his issue with the way Gaelic is treated in Scotland. The clue to what really troubles him is to be found in his remarks about "national identity". While the semantics suggest an acknowledgement of "our distinct national identity", the tone clearly indicates resentment of the fact that this distinctiveness is more than merely acknowledged.

The tone is redolent of that narrow, jealous, supercilious British nationalism which perceives in the tokens and symbols of other national identities only a threat to its own integrity. A chauvinistic and exceptionalistic nationalism that is offended by the sight of the Saltire.

Gaelic is fine, so long as it knows its place. Just as Scotland is OK so long as it does not exhibit any pretension to be other than totally subsumed in a British identity.

Alexander Metcalfe's curator insight, October 18, 2013 11:59 PM

Language and politics

Debi Ray Kidd's curator insight, July 21, 4:48 PM

Languages such as Gaelic are being revived but at what cost?

Scooped by Peter A Bell
Scoop.it!

Mind your (minority) language: Welsh, Gaelic, Irish and Cornish are staging a comeback

Mind your (minority) language: Welsh, Gaelic, Irish and Cornish are staging a comeback | Culture Scotland | Scoop.it
As a teenager in Wales in the late Nineties, I was not a fan of Welsh; it was easy to mock and moan about. There was the translation of my village's road sign, so it was both in 'English' and Welsh: Llandegley and Llandgelau.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter A Bell
Scoop.it!

Gaelic Scots and Other Languages

Gaelic Scots and Other Languages | Culture Scotland | Scoop.it

Last week the National Records of Scotland released long-awaited data from the 2011 census concerning Gaelic, Scots and other languages used in Scotland.


Although the Scottish census data is a rather crude instrument for measuring language skills and language use – it is not possible to differentiate between fluent and non-fluent speakers, to measure the relative frequency of language use, or to validate respondents’ claims – this information is nevertheless extremely valuable. Politicians and the media set great store by the census results, so their policy significance can be considerable.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter A Bell
Scoop.it!

The Missing

The Missing | Culture Scotland | Scoop.it
There has been talk recently (quite rightly) of 'the missing voices of Scottish public life'.  Michael Hance, Director of the Scots Language Centre points to a most recent and more obvious example ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter A Bell
Scoop.it!

£60k boost to help Gaelic tongue survive

THE Scottish Government announced a £60,000 investment in the Gaelic language as the 109th Royal National Mod got under way in Dunoon yesterday.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter A Bell
Scoop.it!

How Scandinavian is Scotland? | Veritas

How Scandinavian is Scotland? | Veritas | Culture Scotland | Scoop.it
Veritas discuss the linguistic similarities between Scotland & Scandinavia. Contact +44 (0)800 8600 674 / info@veritasgroup.co.
more...
No comment yet.