Human Nature and Culture of Peace
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Human Nature and Culture of Peace
Why and how our inherent traits enable us to replace today's culture of violence and adversarialism with a new culture of peace and mutualism
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Lateral Organizations | Harold Jarche

Lateral Organizations | Harold Jarche | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Like everything else, cooperation and collaboration are evolving, and not necessarily in a linear fashion.

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The Power of a Shared Idea

The Power of a Shared Idea | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
All great things begin with an idea. Once the idea is shared, and shared, and shared... it morhps into a BIG idea. Here is the Story of An Idea.... Share ideas and watch them get grow! ~Mia
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Not only is this an encouragement to agents of change, but it also illustrates William Ury's point (The Third Side) that the information society is bringing us back to the ubiquitous win-win relationships of our hunter-gatherer era. Sharing ideas enriches everyone, including the original sharer, just as providing for one's nomadic bands ensured everyone's survival, including one's own.

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Stanford’s Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT)

Stanford’s Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

Stanford’s Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) is an 8-week course designed to develop the qualities of compassion, empathy, and kindness for oneself and others. The course, developed by a team of contemplative scholars, clinical psychologists, and researchers at Stanford University, combines traditional contemplative practices with contemporary psychology and scientific research on compassion. The training includes: - See more at: http://ccare.stanford.edu/cct-details#sthash.G8SvmocX.dpuf


Via Edwin Rutsch
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Once again, it is only when we accept that compassion, empathy and kindness are part of human nature that we can start to cultivate it. Where there are no seeds, no amount of cultivation will make a crop grow.

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Sanford Harmony Program

Sanford Harmony Program | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

The Sanford Harmony Program is designed to make a difference in how Pre-K through 6th grade boys and girls think about and treat each other. It supports positive interactions between boys and girls and lays the foundation for harmonious relationships in the future. 

 

When we promote positive experiences with diverse peers and break down barriers to friendship, children will acquire more flexible thinking about others, develop a broader repertoire of social skills, and feel more comfortable and connected, leading to both social and academic benefits.

 

The program offers two components for fostering friendships and positive peer interactions: Everyday Practices and Classroom Activities. Everyday Practices are classroom strategies for bringing students together. Classroom Activities focus on skills for developing and maintaining positive relationships.

 

Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Since--as recent research is showing--humans are actually cooperative, sociable, empathetic, caringf, peace-loving beings by nature, the skills that can put these traits into practice can be taught and learned. Here is one program that is demonstrating just that.

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Dog And Human Genomes Evolved Together

Dog And Human Genomes Evolved Together | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
A new study finds that genes for diet, behavior, and disease in dogs and humans have evolved together.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

If we evolved to love our dogs, why not believe that we also evolved to love our fellow humans? Yest another ax cut at the root of the innate adversarialism myth.

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Dan Ariely: What makes us feel good about our work? | Video on TED.com

What motivates us to work? Contrary to conventional wisdom, it isn't just money. But it's not exactly joy either. It seems that most of us thrive by making constant progress and feeling a sense of purpose.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Research contradicts today's common myths about what motivates us. If this is true, what implications does it have for the assumptions upon which the current economic structures, rules and relations are built?

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Daniel H. Cohen: For argument’s sake | Video on TED.com

Why do we argue? To out-reason our opponents, prove them wrong, and, most of all, to win! ... Right? Philosopher Daniel H. Cohen shows how our most common form of argument -- a war in which one person must win and the other must lose -- misses out on the real benefits of engaging in active disagreement. (Filmed at TEDxColbyCollege.)

Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

A good take on non-adversarial argument, how it can be done, and what kind of person it requires. Helps understand the significance of the Baha'i approach to 'consultation'.

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'Evolution will punish you if you're selfish and mean'

'Evolution will punish you if you're selfish and mean' | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Two Michigan State University evolutionary biologists offer new evidence that evolution doesn't favor the selfish, disproving a theory popularized in 2012. "We found evolution will punish you if yo...

Via Howard Rheingold
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Science is debunking the myth that the need for competition to survive has genetically programmed selfish, aggressive competitive propensities through evolution. The only way we or any other species survived was through both inter- and intra-species cooperation. The present-day structuring of society in terms of win-lose games needs to change if we are to continue surviving. 

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Cindy Tam's curator insight, September 23, 2013 8:31 PM

Long-term Success: Are you willing to forgo your selfishness and meanness?

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Social: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Connect | KurzweilAI

Social: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Connect | KurzweilAI | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

n Social, renowned psychologist Matthew Lieberman explores groundbreaking research in social neuroscience revealing that our need to connect with other people is even more fundamental, more basic, than our need for food or shelter.  Because of this, our brain uses its spare time to learn about the social world – other people and our relation to them. It is believed that we must commit 10,000 hours to master a skill.  According to Lieberman, each of us has spent 10,000 hours learning to make sense of people and groups by the time we are ten.

Social argues that our need to reach out to and connect with others is a primary driver behind our behavior.  


Via Howard Rheingold
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Ruth Obadia's curator insight, July 31, 2013 2:05 AM

ruth obadia

Martha Love's curator insight, October 10, 2013 4:26 AM

I find this book to be extremely important in our understanding of the true nature of our human species. 

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peaceful parenting: Gentle Discipline ~ Staying the Course

peaceful parenting: Gentle Discipline ~ Staying the Course | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

Few of us are prepared for the emotional shock wave of falling in love with our first tiny offspring. As a new parent, you hold your new child’s life in your hands, and through that sacred trust open yourself up to a new depth of compassion for another person. When the time comes to provide guidance or limits for this incredibly important being, you may find yourself rethinking old concepts of what discipline and parenting are all about. Your baby may have taught you that when it comes to nourishment, sleep, and being held, you can trust her cues and your own inner voice above the many public voices telling you what you “should” be doing. It is empowering to discover that you are the most reliable expert on your own child. Indeed, that you and your child can be a team in finding the answers.

Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

How important it is for us all to learn and teach non-violent discipline in the home and at school.

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Why Americans Are the Weirdest People in the World

Why Americans Are the Weirdest People in the World | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Joe Henrich, Steven Heine and Ara Norenzayan are shaking up psychology and economics with their view of how culture shapes human thought and behavior.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

A readable narration of how an understanding of cultural difference is beginning to replace assumptions regarding human nature in science.

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The Fourth Estate Summit

The Fourth Estate Leadership Summit will take place August 8-11, 2013 in Los Angeles, CA. Young activists and educators from all over the world will gather to interact with experts and innovators in the fields of film, business, journalism, economics, and international justice. We're bringing together organizations and leaders who believe that basic human rights should be a priority for us all, and that the best and brightest minds should be activated in that endeavor. 

Deadline to apply is May 1st.

To Apply:
http://spr.ly/4E_main5

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Krista Tippett: Reconnecting with compassion

The term "compassion" -- typically reserved for the saintly or the sappy -- has fallen out of touch with reality. At a special TEDPrize@UN, journalist Krista Tippett deconstructs the meaning of compassion through several moving stories, and proposes a new, more attainable definition for the word.

Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Speaks to the day-to-day power of compassion and tenderness to transform and build.

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Jason Pontin: Can technology solve our big problems?

In 1969, Buzz Aldrin’s historical step onto the moon leapt mankind into an era of technological possibility. The awesome power of technology was to be used to solve all of our big problems. Fast forward to present day, and what's happened?
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Contrary to popular belief, not all technology is 'hard' -- physical devices. Some of the most important technological developments of humanity have been 'soft' -- new ways of organizing our collective life. The single most important technological challenge of the day is to re-engineer our failed 'national security system' and build a global collective security system through a world-wide, supranational federation of nations with democratic legislative, executive and judicial powers.

 

Although many fear that human nature will prevent us from achieving this goal, Jason Pontin describes what is really keeping us from solving such "big problems":

 

"Sometimes we choose not to solve big problems, [as they require] a political decision with popular appeal... Sometimes, we can't solve big problems because our political systems fail… Finally, big problems sometimes elude solution because we don't really understand the problem… Hard problems are hard.

 

“It's not true that we can't solve big problems… We can, we must, but these four elements must all be present: Political leaders and the public must care to solve a problem; institutions must support its solution; …and we must understand it… We are left alone with our day, and the solutions of the future will be harder won. God knows, we don't lack for the challenges.”

 

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Seth Godin: The tribes we lead

Seth Godin argues the Internet has ended mass marketing and revived a human social unit from the distant past: tribes. Founded on shared ideas and values, tribes give ordinary people the power to lead and make big change.

Via AlGonzalezinfo
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

This is a great talk for actual and potential change agents to watch, listen to and reflect on.

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, September 25, 2013 7:16 AM

This video is more about leadership than marketing. As a true thought leader, Seth Godin identified a modle by which anyone can lead positive change by:

 

~ challenging the status quo on something we are passionate about

~ buliding a culture and a movement by using the social web 

 

What movement are you leading?  What tribes can you build?

Chery Gegelman's curator insight, September 25, 2013 8:37 AM
Who are you upsetting? Who are you connecting? Who are you leading?
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Benjamin Barber: Why mayors should rule the world

It often seems like federal-level politicians care more about creating gridlock than solving the world's problems. So who's actually getting bold things done? City mayors. So, political theorist Benjamin Barber suggests: Let's give them more control over global policy. Barber shows how these "urban homeboys" are solving pressing problems on their own turf -- and maybe in the world.

Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Barber very rightly says, “Unless we find a way to globalize democracy or democratize globalization we will increasingly not only risk the failure to address all of these transnational problems, but we will risk losing democracy itself, locked up in the old nation-state box, unable to address global problems democratically.” His proposal to achieve this on a local level is part of the solution, but we also need the institutional arrangements required to do so on the global scale. Strengthening local governments is one front, but building a global federation of nation-states is long overdue and essential to addressing the problems he mentions.

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For more wonder, rewild the world

"Wolves were once native to the US' Yellowstone National Park -- until hunting wiped them out. But when, in 1995, the wolves began to come back (thanks to an aggressive management program), something interesting happened: the rest of the park began to find a new, more healthful balance. In a bold thought experiment, George Monbiot imagines a wilder world in which humans work to restore the complex, lost natural food chains that once surrounded us."

Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

The competitive, limited-resource view of evolution does not account for this phenomenon. Eliminating one of the competitors for limited resources should improve the lot of the rest, but it actually harms them. The proposal to rewild the world is a call to recognize that the true law of the jungle is cooperation.

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The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow of energy and information between people

The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow of energy and information between people | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow of energy and information between people, essential in our development
"The study of neuroplasticity is changing the way scientists think about the...

 

“Relationship is key,” he emphasizes. “When we work with relationship, we work with brain structure. Relationship stimulates us and is essential in our development. People rarely mention relationship in brain studies, but it provides vital input to the brain. Every form of psychotherapy that works, works because it creates healthier brain function and structure.… In approaching our lives, we can ask where do we experience the chaos or rigidity that reveal where integration is impaired.

 

We can then use the focus of our attention to integrate both our brain and our relationships. Ultimately we can learn to be open in an authentic way to others, and to ourselves. The outcome of such an integrative presence is not only a sense of deep well-being and compassion for ourselves and others, but also an opening of the doors of awareness to a sense of the interdependence of everything. ‘We’ are indeed a part of an interconnected whole.””

 

Patty de Llosa

 

 


Via Edwin Rutsch
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

More evidence of the mutualistic capacity of the human brain -- far more significant than the tiny area that makes us capable of anger and violence.

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Ruth Obadia's curator insight, October 7, 2013 6:04 AM


“We is what me is!”

Eli Levine's curator insight, February 12, 2014 11:34 PM

The network of "I" is connected to the network that is "us" in an upward gradient.

 

There can be no full "I" without "we", because all humans have to be socialized, like any other social animal, in order to develop fully as individual human beings.

 

We are all connected to one another and the environment to form one web on this planet.  It affects us and we affect it, sometimes for good, sometimes for bad, depending upon what we do to it consciously and subconsciously.

 

Why listen to the individualists who have absolutely no sense or desire to connect with the other that is around them and that has helped form them as individuals, psychologically, physically and socially?

 

They are not in touch with the actual world, and are probably just of a pathological mindset that, I think, needs to be treated as a disease by our society.

 

We are all one.

 

What you do effects all those who are around you and are connected to you.

 

And, most importantly, what you do to them/it is the same thing that you do to yourself, as an individual.

 

Think about it.

 

Libertarians.

 

Conservatives.

 

Think about it.

LUZ DEL MAR's curator insight, August 25, 2014 8:57 PM

mente - cerebro- relaciones

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DEEP PRAGMATISM | Edge.org

DEEP PRAGMATISM | Edge.org | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

JOSHUA D. GREENE is the John and Ruth Hazel Associate Professor of the Social Sciences and the director of the Moral Cognition Laboratory in the Department of Psychology, Harvard University. He studies the psychology and neuroscience of morality, focusing on the interplay between emotion and reasoning in moral decision-making. His broader interests cluster around the intersection of philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience. He is the author of Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them.

Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Are we wired to cooperate or compete? How about our ingroups and outgroups? What implications does this have for morality? In this light, what is needed to facilitate today's challenge of global socio-politic-economic integration? Joshua Greene addresses these questions in his research and offerse some unexpected insights.

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Evolution 'punishes mean people'

Evolution 'punishes mean people' | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Evolution does not favour selfish people, according to new research that challenges a previous theory that suggests it is preferable to put yourself first.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

The evidence keeps pouring in. When will we wake up and realize that we have fashioned all our social institutions after a scientific error? When will we accept that those institutions need to be refashioned after the true "law of the jungle" which is symbiosis - mutual aid and cooperation?

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A tale of two political systems

It's a standard assumption in the West: As a society progresses, it eventually becomes a capitalist, multi-party democracy. Right? Eric X. Li, a Chinese investor and political scientist, begs to differ.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

The point is well taken: not merely a defense of the Chinese political system, but rather a questioning of the meta-narratives by which there is only one system possible. We need to open our minds and research to finding new models on which to build a true culture of peace.

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Trends in Cognitive Sciences - Human cooperation

Trends in Cognitive Sciences - Human cooperation | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

"Why should you help a competitor? Why should you contribute to the public good if free riders reap the benefits of your generosity? Cooperation in a competitive world is a conundrum. Natural selection opposes the evolution of cooperation unless specific mechanisms are at work. Five such mechanisms have been proposed: direct reciprocity, indirect reciprocity, spatial selection, multilevel selection, and kin selection. Here we discuss empirical evidence from laboratory experiments and field studies of human interactions for each mechanism. We also consider cooperation in one-shot, anonymous interactions for which no mechanisms are apparent. We argue that this behavior reflects the overgeneralization of cooperative strategies learned in the context of direct and indirect reciprocity: we show that automatic, intuitive responses favor cooperative strategies that reciprocate."


Via Howard Rheingold
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

From an assumed, unproven instinct for competition, we have gone to a demonstrable instinct for cooperation.

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, July 15, 2013 3:34 PM

Reciprocation is deeply embedded. Nowak et al's work on the evolution of cooperation yields clues for present-day human behavior.

luiy's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:53 AM

Highlights:

Theoretical work has revealed five mechanisms for the evolution of cooperation.These are direct and indirect reciprocity, and spatial, multilevel, and kin selection.We present experimental evidence for each mechanism operating in human behavior.We show that reciprocation is an automatic response, which implies that reciprocity has a key role.

 

 

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Identity and peace

Identity and peace | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

There is a tribe in Africa where the birth date of a child is counted not from when they were born, nor from when they are conceived but from the day that the child was a thought in its mother’s mind. And when a woman decides that she will have a child, she goes off and sits under a tree, by herself, and she listens until she can hear the song of the child that wants to come. And after she’s heard the song of this child, she comes back to the man who will be the child’s father, and teaches it to him. And then, when they make love to physically conceive the child, some of that time they sing the song of the child, as a way to invite it.

Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

"In the African tribe there is one other occasion upon which the villagers sing to the child. If at any time during his or her life, the person commits a crime or aberrant social act, the individual is called to the center of the village and the people in the community form a circle around them. Then they sing their song to them.

"The tribe recognizes that the correction for antisocial behavior is not punishment; it is love and the remembrance of identity. When you recognize your own song, you have no desire or need to do anything that would hurt another."

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'World Peace Game' Teaches Kids Cooperation, Compassion

'World Peace Game' Teaches Kids Cooperation, Compassion | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

Learning to save the world

 

John Hunter has been playing the World Peace Game for more than three decades: at his school, in summer camps, and with students in Norway. And in all the years he's played, he's never seen students lose. Not once. "Sometimes it's a very dire situation where it doesn't seem possible, but they've always managed to win the game," he says.

 

Part of it, he says, is how his students collaborate. But another part is how he behaves. He doesn't butt in to the game, or tell his students what to do and what not to do. Instead, he treats these CFOs and prime ministers and secretaries of state as peers. Equals. "So together, we become co-teachers," he says.

 

"And they, in this safe place, can say, 'well, we'll just try and if it doesn't work, we'll try something else. And if it doesn't work, we'll try something else.' We get better and better trying. And eventually they win. "They save the world every time. And they're going to grow up and hopefully be able to do that for real."

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The United Nations wants to hear from you.

The United Nations wants to hear from you. | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
I have just told them my priorities for creating a better world. Join me and vote!
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Under "Suggest a priority", I wrote: "The establishment of a world-wide, democratic federation of nations, with legislative, executive and judicial powers, in order to free up the massive resources wasted on today's arms race for 'deterrence' purposes, put an end the world dictatorship of multinational corporations, and make major global issues finally tractable beyond the merely national level."

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