Human Nature and Culture of Peace
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The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow of energy and information between people

The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow of energy and information between people | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow of energy and information between people, essential in our development
"The study of neuroplasticity is changing the way scientists think about the...

 

“Relationship is key,” he emphasizes. “When we work with relationship, we work with brain structure. Relationship stimulates us and is essential in our development. People rarely mention relationship in brain studies, but it provides vital input to the brain. Every form of psychotherapy that works, works because it creates healthier brain function and structure.… In approaching our lives, we can ask where do we experience the chaos or rigidity that reveal where integration is impaired.

 

We can then use the focus of our attention to integrate both our brain and our relationships. Ultimately we can learn to be open in an authentic way to others, and to ourselves. The outcome of such an integrative presence is not only a sense of deep well-being and compassion for ourselves and others, but also an opening of the doors of awareness to a sense of the interdependence of everything. ‘We’ are indeed a part of an interconnected whole.””

 

Patty de Llosa

 

 


Via Edwin Rutsch
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

More evidence of the mutualistic capacity of the human brain -- far more significant than the tiny area that makes us capable of anger and violence.

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Ruth Obadia's curator insight, October 7, 2013 6:04 AM


“We is what me is!”

Eli Levine's curator insight, February 12, 2014 11:34 PM

The network of "I" is connected to the network that is "us" in an upward gradient.

 

There can be no full "I" without "we", because all humans have to be socialized, like any other social animal, in order to develop fully as individual human beings.

 

We are all connected to one another and the environment to form one web on this planet.  It affects us and we affect it, sometimes for good, sometimes for bad, depending upon what we do to it consciously and subconsciously.

 

Why listen to the individualists who have absolutely no sense or desire to connect with the other that is around them and that has helped form them as individuals, psychologically, physically and socially?

 

They are not in touch with the actual world, and are probably just of a pathological mindset that, I think, needs to be treated as a disease by our society.

 

We are all one.

 

What you do effects all those who are around you and are connected to you.

 

And, most importantly, what you do to them/it is the same thing that you do to yourself, as an individual.

 

Think about it.

 

Libertarians.

 

Conservatives.

 

Think about it.

LUZ DEL MAR's curator insight, August 25, 2014 8:57 PM

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Human Nature and Culture of Peace
Why and how our inherent traits enable us to replace today's culture of violence and adversarialism with a new culture of peace and mutualism
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Beyond the Culture of Contest: Michael Karlberg - Subtítulos en Español

TEDxInnsbruck - Michael Karlberg - Beyond the Culture of Contest: A Critical Juncture of Human History. Es profesor de comunicaciones en la Western Washington University, EE.UU. En sus investigaciones examina la lucha por generar un orden social más justo y sostenible en una era de creciente interdependencia mundial.

 

Véase la versión con títulos y subtítulos en español del video original en http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=J0ZCAbYrQ7Q.

 

Véase el libreto completo en español en
http://www.cultura-de-paz.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=444:vea-primero-esta-charla-en-ted-talks&catid=27:inicio-esp&Itemid=27

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Values and guidelines to transform our mechanistic worldview

Values and guidelines to transform our mechanistic worldview | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
We know our choices shape our world, but we rarely recognise that these choices are themselves shaped by our beliefs about the world. It is becoming increasingly clear that it is not technology, or the economy, or politics that presents us with the biggest challenge in creating a sustainable world, but escaping the trap of our present, mechanistic worldview. To quote Wendell Berry:
We have lived by the assumption that what was good for us would be good for the world. We have been wrong. We must change our lives, so that it will be possible to live by the contrary assumption that what is good for the world will be good for us. And that requires that we make the effort to know the world and learn what is good for it. We must learn to cooperate in its processes and to yield to its limits.

Via David Hain
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
The old mechanistic worldview--coupled with deterministic thought--has chained up our capacity to change the world. These chains we must now break, before they break us.
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David Hain's curator insight, May 24, 6:20 AM

Reframing our mental models about the world is critical to making a sustainable difference!

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Want to Make Hunter-Gatherers Irrational? Expose Them to Free Markets - Evonomics

Want to Make Hunter-Gatherers Irrational? Expose Them to Free Markets - Evonomics | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Modern capitalism and the evolution of rational decision making
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
"“Whenever a pattern of human behavior is widespread, there is reason to suspect that it might have something to do with our evolutionary history,” a pair of biologists recently noted. True enough, but sometimes patterns of human behavior aren’t as widespread as we want to believe, in our eagerness to spin a theory. (People have, in fact, tried to find a reason why the endowment effect must have evolved to be a part of every human psyche—for example, here.) The attractiveness of such theories should make everyone a little cautious about the generalizations on which they rest."
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How the Deadly Sin of Avarice Was Rehabilitated as Self Interest - Evonomics

How the Deadly Sin of Avarice Was Rehabilitated as Self Interest - Evonomics | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
In the aftermath of the stock market crash of 1987, the New York Times headlined an editorial “Ban Greed? No: Harness It,” It continued: “Perhaps the most important idea here is the need to distinguish between motive and consequence. Derivative securities attract the greedy the way raw meat attracts piranhas. But so what? Private greed can lead to public good. The sensible goal for securities regulation is to channel selfish behavior, not thwart it.”
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
"The greatest challenges now facing the world—including controlling the spread of epidemics and managing climate change and governing the knowledge-based economy–arise from global social interactions that cannot adequately be governed by channeling entirely self-interested citizens to do the right thing by means of incentives and sanctions, whether provided by private contract or by government fiat. With economic inequality increasing in the world’s major economies helped along in many cases by flagrant abuse of legal and moral standards, one may also now doubt Dr. Johnson’s reassurance that “there are few ways in which a man can be more innocently employed than in getting money.”
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We're Not as Selfish as Economists Think We Are. Here's the Proof. - Evonomics

We're Not as Selfish as Economists Think We Are. Here's the Proof. - Evonomics | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Misanthropy grants a free pass to the grasping, power-mad minority who tend to dominate our political systems. If only we knew how unusual they are, we might be more inclined to shun them and seek better leaders. It contributes to the real danger we confront: not a general selfishness, but a general passivity. Billions of decent people tut and shake their heads as the world burns, immobilised by the conviction that no one else cares.

You are not alone. The world is with you, even if it has not found its voice.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
"The effects of an undue pessimism about human nature are momentous. ...those who have the bleakest view of humanity are the least likely to vote. What’s the point, they reason, if everyone else votes only in their own selfish interests? Interestingly... liberals tend to possess a dimmer view of other people than conservatives do..."
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The inside story of the Paris climate agreement

The inside story of the Paris climate agreement | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
What would you do if your job was to save the planet? When Christiana Figueres was tapped by the UN to lead the Paris climate conference (COP 21) in December 2015, she reacted the way many people would: she thought it would be impossible to bring the leaders of 195 countries into agreement on how to slow climate change. Find out how she turned her skepticism into optimism -- and helped the world achieve the most important climate agreement in history.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
“Behold how [the light of unity] is now dawning upon the world’s darkened horizon. The first candle is unity in the political realm, the early glimmerings of which can now be discerned. The second candle is unity of thought in world undertakings, the consummation of which will ere long be witnessed."                                                              - 'Abdu'l-Bahá - 
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How megacities are changing the map of the world

How megacities are changing the map of the world | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
"I want you to reimagine how life is organized on earth," says global strategist Parag Khanna. As our expanding cities grow ever more connected through transportation, energy and communications networks, we evolve from geography to what he calls "connectography." This emerging global network civilization holds the promise of reducing pollution and inequality -- and even overcoming geopolitical rivalries. In this talk, Khanna asks us to embrace a new maxim for the future: "Connectivity is destiny."
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
Connectivity, not sovereignty, has become the organizing principle of a new global civilization, says Khanna. Connectography is not just about integrating cities. It is about a new way of seeing and being in the world as a single organism, a human symbiosis, more than the sum of its parts, .
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The problem with race-based medicine

The problem with race-based medicine | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Social justice advocate and law scholar Dorothy Roberts has a precise and powerful message: Race-based medicine is bad medicine. Even today, many doctors still use race as a medical shortcut; they make important decisions about things like pain tolerance based on a patient's skin color instead of medical observation and measurement. In this searing talk, Roberts lays out the lingering traces of race-based medicine -- and invites us to be a part of ending it. "It is more urgent than ever to finally abandon this backward legacy," she says, "and to affirm our common humanity by ending the social inequalities that truly divide us."
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
"Scientific Racism" was once an actual field of study, which nominally disappeared around the globe following the racism-based atrocities committed in the WWII era. However, the 'findings' of Scientific Racism are still alive and well, not only in popular thought, but also in the medical profession, where out-dated racial assumptions are still used as diagnostic and prescriptive tools. This TED talk addresses this problem head on and should be carefully considered by both health professionals and their patients.
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Our campaign to ban plastic bags in Bali

Our campaign to ban plastic bags in Bali | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Plastic bags are essentially indestructible, yet they're used and thrown away with reckless abandon. Most end up in the ocean, where they pollute the water and harm marine life; the rest are burned in garbage piles, where they release harmful dioxins into the atmosphere. Melati and Isabel Wijsen are on a mission to stop plastic bags from suffocating their beautiful island home of Bali. Their efforts -- including petitions, beach cleanups, even a hunger strike -- paid off when they convinced their governor to commit to a plastic bag-free Bali by 2018. "Don't ever let anyone tell you that you're too young or you won't understand," Isabel says to other aspiring activists. "We're not telling you it's going to be easy. We're telling you it's going to be worth it."
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

These two junior youth demonstrate the power of their age group -- the power of vision, initiative, action, and perseverance. Hopefully many junior youth groups around the world will emulate them, identify local needs and brainstorm more wonderful social initiatives.

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At COP21 Baha'is see movement toward unity - Bahá'í World News Service

At COP21 Baha'is see movement toward unity - Bahá'í World News Service | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

"While some have suggested the final document falls short of what is really needed to prevent major effects from climate change, the world has proven its ability to come together at the global level and to consult deeply about its future."

Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

 "...the world has proven its ability to come together at the global level and to consult deeply about its future."

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The way we think about work is broken

The way we think about work is broken | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
What makes work satisfying? Apart from a paycheck, there are intangible values that, Barry Schwartz suggests, our current way of thinking about work simply ignores. It's time to stop thinking of workers as cogs on a wheel.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Human nature is changed by the theories we have of human nature, says Barry Schwartz. It is created, not just discovered. What kind of human nature to we want to help design?

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The surprising way groups like ISIS stay in power

The surprising way groups like ISIS stay in power | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
ISIS, Hezbollah, Hamas. These three very different groups are known for violence — but that’s only a portion of what they do, says policy analyst Benedetta Berti. They also attempt to win over populations with social work: setting up schools and hospitals, offering safety and security, and filling the gaps left by weak governments. Understanding the broader work of these groups suggests new strategies for ending the violence.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Massive military budgets (~50% of global public spending over the past century) and destructive wars mean less social spending and the collapse of existing social services. This in turn opens a gap that violent non-state organizations fill to gain public support, which leads in turn to greater military spending. This vicious circle feeding the greed of the industrial military complex can only be overcome over time by investing more in social well-being than in war. This, in turn, will only be possible by replacing today's 'national security system' with a global collective security system.

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Las diez empresas del mundo que más dinero ganan con las guerras

Las diez empresas del mundo que más dinero ganan con las guerras | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

Las diez empresas del mundo que más dinero ganan con las guerras:

1 – Lockheed Martin (EEUU): Armadura de misiles, electrónica y espacio aéreo. Ventas por 36.270 millones dólares en 2011. Ganancias netas: 2.655 millones de dólares. 123.000 empleados.

2 – Boeing (EEUU): Aviones, electrónica, misiles, espacio aéreo. Ventas por 31.830 millones de dólares. Ganancias netas de 4.018 millones de dólares. 171.700 empleados.

3 – BAE Systems (Reino Unido): Aviones, artillería, misiles, vehículos militares, naves. Ventas por 29.150 millones de dólares. Ganancias netas por 2.349 millones de dólares. 93.500 empleados.

4 – General Dynamics (EEUU): Artillería, electrónica. Ventas por 23.760 millones de dólares. Ganancias netas de 2.526 millones de dólares, 95.100 empleados.

5 – Raytheon (EEUU): Misiles, electrónica. Ventas por 22.470 millones de dólares. Ganancias netas de 1.896 millones de dólares. 71.00 empleados.

6 – Northrop Grumman (EEUU): Aviones, electrónica, misiles, buques de guerra. Ventas por 21,390 millones. Ganancias netas por 2.118 millones de dólares. 72.500 empleados.

7 – EADS (UE): Aviones, electrónica, misiles. Ventas por 16.390 millones de dólares. Ganancias netas por 1.442 millones de dólares. 133.120 empleados.

8 – Finmeccanica (Italia): Aviones, vehículos de artillería, misiles. Ventas por 14.560 millones de dólares. Ganancias netas por 902 millones de dólares. 70.470 empleados.

9 – L-3 Communications (EEUU): Electrónica. Ventas por 12.520 millones de dólares. Ganancias netas por 956 millones de dólares. 61.000 empleados.

10 – United Technologies (EEUU): Aeronaves, electrónica, motores. Ventas por 11.640 millones de dólares. Ganancias netas por 5.347 millones de dólares. 199.900 empleados.

Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

¿Quí Bono? ¿Quien se beneficia más de la actual cultura de violencia y guerra? ¡Aquí está la lista! Ya no hay dudas....

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The way we think about work is broken

The way we think about work is broken | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
What makes work satisfying? Apart from a paycheck, there are intangible values that, Barry Schwartz suggests, our current way of thinking about work simply ignores. It's time to stop thinking of workers as cogs on a wheel.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
The way we think about human nature (a "conceptual technology") creates the world in its own image. What kind of world do we want to build? Can we become as willing to change our broken conceptual technologies as we are to discard useless physical technologies? We must. It is the only way to build the kind of world we want.
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New Math Untangles the Mysterious Nature of Causality

New Math Untangles the Mysterious Nature of Causality | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Contrary to conventional scientific wisdom, conscious beings and other macroscopic entities might have greater influence over the future than does the sum of their microscopic components.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
Causal emergence (or emergent causality) means that more complex systems add new causes that their simpler component systems do not have. This is an important step towards overcoming the limitations of atomic (or genetic, individual, etc.) determinisim).
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How Bad Biology is Killing the Economy - Evonomics

How Bad Biology is Killing the Economy - Evonomics | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
The CEO of Enron – now in prison – happily applied ‘selfish gene’ logic to his human capital, thus creating a self-fulfilling prophecy. Assuming that the human species is driven purely by greed and fear, Jeffrey Skilling produced employees driven by the same motives. Enron imploded under the mean-spirited weight of his policies, offering a preview of what was in store for the world economy as a whole.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
"for those who keep looking to biology for an answer, the fundamental yet rarely asked question is why natural selection designed our brains so that we’re in tune with our fellow human beings and feel distress at their distress, and pleasure at their pleasure. If the exploitation of others were all that mattered, evolution should never have got into the empathy business. But it did, and the political and economic elites had better grasp that in a hurry."
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How Economists Killed Your Conscience - Evonomics

How Economists Killed Your Conscience - Evonomics | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
What’s the best way to get people to behave themselves? Legal and policy experts often assume people are basically selfish creatures who respond only to punishments and rewards, and who can’t be trusted to do a good job or refrain from lying, cheating and stealing unless given the right “incentives.” Are CEOs neglecting their firms? Tie their pay to share price with stock grants and options. Are America’s children failing to learn their ABCs? Give teachers bonus pay if they raise test scores, and fire them if they don’t. Are Medicare expenses increasing too quickly? Use “pay for performance” schemes that give doctors and hospitals a direct financial motive for keeping health care costs down.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
"Just as we cannot live well without gravity, we may not be able to live well without conscience. The statistical evidence indicates that cultural habits of unselfish prosocial behavior are essential to both economic growth and psychological wellbeing. Evidence is also accumulating that unselfish prosocial behavior is on the decline in the United States. Just as environmental scientists have become concerned about many sources of scientific data that point to the possibility of global warming, some social scientists have become concerned about the growing evidence that points to the possibility of “conscience cooling.”
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Our lonely society makes it hard to come home from war

Our lonely society makes it hard to come home from war | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Sebastian Junger has seen war up close, and he knows the impact that battlefield trauma has on soldiers. But he suggests there's another major cause of pain for veterans when they come home: the experience of leaving the tribal closeness of the military and returning to an alienating and bitterly divided modern society. "Sometimes, we ask ourselves if we can save the vets," Junger says. "I think the real question is if we can save ourselves." (This talk comes from the PBS special "TED Talks: War & Peace," which premieres Monday, May 30 at 9 p.m. EST.)
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
To achieve well-being, human nature demands community, solidarity and connectedness, not isolation, enmity and conflict. Modern society provides too little of the former and too much of the latter.
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What does it mean to be a citizen of the world?

What does it mean to be a citizen of the world? | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Hugh Evans started a movement that mobilizes "global citizens," people who self-identify first and foremost not as members of a state, nation or tribe but as members of the human race. In this uplifting and personal talk, learn more about how this new understanding of our place in the world is galvanizing people to take action in the fights against extreme poverty, climate change, gender inequality and more. "These are ultimately global issues," Evans says, "and they can only be solved by global citizens demanding global solutions from their leaders."
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
World citizenship is the next step in our socio-political evolution from clans to tribes to city-states to nation-states to a world-state. Its outer expression is our selfless service to humanity.
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Riane Eisler on Changing the Whole System

Riane Eisler on Changing the Whole System | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

"Does there have to be so much cruelty and violence, so much injustice and suffering? Is it inevitable, as we are often told, just 'human nature'? Or are there alternatives?"

Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:
"Many people recognize that old thinking cannot help us solve the problems it created. Young people are especially hungry for a new paradigm, a new way of looking at the world and living in it."
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Psychologist Lt. Col. Dave Grossman -- On the Psychology of Killing

Alan Gregg has an in-depth conversation with military psychologist Lt. Col. Dave Grossman about his book "On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to K...
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

¡Con subtítulos en español! These are good arguments against the myth that soldiers going to war proves that we are inherently violent and aggressive by nature. Actually, the opposite would seem to be true.

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Cross-species dolphin society gets friendlier after hurricanes

Cross-species dolphin society gets friendlier after hurricanes | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Unusual coalitions of bottlenose and spotted dolphins drop their aggression following hurricanes, revealing peaceful interactions as the basis for mingling
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

In animal as in human societies, "aggressive behaviour is very dramatic and easy for us to recognise, which can make it seem like a very important part of [their] interactions. But it seems that actually it’s the subtle, peaceful behaviours that form an important foundation for the interactions." 

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Mass migration heightens awareness of humanity's 'organic unity' - Bahá'í World News Service

Mass migration heightens awareness of humanity's 'organic unity' - Bahá'í World News Service | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it

"The movement of populations illustrates that the peace, stability and prosperity of the different regions of the world are interconnected and that solutions cannot be intelligently considered in isolation from this global reality."

Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

"Social, institutional and legal arrangements that meet the needs of one region, but do not take into consideration those of another, are proving insufficient. What is becoming apparent is that the movement of populations is but the latest symptom of a much deeper and far-reaching concern."

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A visual history of human knowledge

A visual history of human knowledge | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
How does knowledge grow? Sometimes it begins with one insight and grows into many branches; other times it grows as a complex and interconnected network. Infographics expert Manuel Lima explores the thousand-year history of mapping data -- from languages to dynasties -- using trees and networks of information. It's a fascinating history of visualizations, and a look into humanity's urge to map what we know.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

Traditionally, hierarchical models of nature, thought and human relations has supported a 'power-over' and 'power-against' paradigm of social structures, which in turn has justified and legitimized relations of competition (win-lose) and structural violence. The network model of nature, thought and human relations, is now enabling the development of a new paradigm of 'power-for' and 'power-with', which promises to revolutionize social structures based on cooperation (win-win) and interdependence.

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What explains the rise of humans?

What explains the rise of humans? | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Seventy thousand years ago, our human ancestors were insignificant animals, just minding their own business in a corner of Africa with all the other animals. But now, few would disagree that humans dominate planet Earth; we've spread to every continent, and our actions determine the fate of other animals (and possibly Earth itself). How did we get from there to here? Historian Yuval Noah Harari suggests a surprising reason for the rise of humanity.
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

The rise of humanity was caused by our capacity for flexible, massive cooperation, which was made possible by our power of imagination, which enabled us to unite around common beliefs. What would happen to our predominant dog-eat-dog culture of violence if our beliefs regarding an inherently conflictual human nature were to prove wrong and be discarded?

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10 Documentaries That Will Change Your Perspective On The World We Live In

10 Documentaries That Will Change Your Perspective On The World We Live In | Human Nature and Culture of Peace | Scoop.it
Documentaries hold a power unique to any other type of film. They have the remarkable capacity to shift our understanding of the vast and complex world in which we live, most of the time presenting us with powerfully relevant information, a previously unknown perspective, and hopefully, a new choice to make a difference. The following list of documentaries showcases films […]
Peter C. Newton-Evans's insight:

These documentaries show that our current worldview is not only fundamentally mistaken, but also damaging to our individual and collective well-being.

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