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LEGO Foundation LEGO Foundation - Research & Learning - Foundation Research - Cultures of Creativity

LEGO Foundation LEGO Foundation - Research & Learning - Foundation Research - Cultures of Creativity | Culture Change | Scoop.it

Via june holley
Liz Rykert's insight:

Amazing article on creativity and building a culture that supports and creates it. It also includes bridging cultures and a model to think about how to build a creative culture. From the Lego Foundation.

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june holley's curator insight, March 16, 2014 12:09 PM

FABULOUS GRAPHICS IN HERE. Much to learn about the kind of leaders we need.

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Culture/Change insights and priorities

Curated insights and priorities from the December 2014 Ford Foundation Culture/Change convening.
Liz Rykert's insight:

Nice Summary Report from the work of the Ford Foundation on Culture Change and what it might take to start to really support people who are working in culture change and recommendations on how to move culture change work ahead. Loved the acknowledgement about the need for new/better ways to measure impact. 

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Culture University | The Premier Workplace Culture Educational Site where the top workplace culture experts in the world share their insights

Culture University | The Premier Workplace Culture Educational Site where the top workplace culture experts in the world share their insights | Culture Change | Scoop.it
The premier culture educational site where some of the top workplace culture experts in history share their insights along with the latest trends and best practices. Our purpose is to positively impact society on a global scale through culture awareness, education, and action.
Liz Rykert's insight:

I just posted an article from this great site CultureUniversity.com thinking it was the full resource and it was not. So I am reposting it. 

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Innovation Excellence | To Change your Organization, Change the Way you Bring Change

Innovation Excellence | To Change your Organization, Change the Way you Bring Change | Culture Change | Scoop.it
The most effective approach to change does not start or end in the C-suite. It happens at the heart of the organization, where mid-level managers and their teams build the momentum to implement and lead change. Executives initiate and support change, the rest of the organization lead change.
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Liz Rykert's curator insight, March 29, 12:54 PM

I found this article from Innovation Excellence right up my alley. It describes the approach we have been taking with hospitals and other large organizations in clear and simple language.


I think you will find the reasons they cite for why people don't like change efforts will resonate. 


In essence the article describes the need to tap everyone in an organization, to everyone as a change agent. 

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Attention, All Scientists: Do Improv, With Alan Alda’s Help

Attention, All Scientists: Do Improv, With Alan Alda’s Help | Culture Change | Scoop.it
The former star of the television show “M*A*S*H” helps teach a way to explain complicated concepts in a clearer way.
Liz Rykert's insight:

I love how improv helps people "act their way in to a new way of thinking rather than think their way into a new way of being".


I would love to do a workshop with Hawkeye!

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Embracing Complexity, Connectivity, and Change - YouTube

Learn why it's important to embrace complexity when working in the social sector. Professor Brenda Zimmerman of York University, shared her perspective in th...
Liz Rykert's insight:

This video of Brenda Zimmerman was taken at the Next Generation Evaluation Conference at Stanford in November 2013. She is doing a summary of the day and as she does she hits important highlights of embracing complexity - the title of her talk. It is about 45 mins. 

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How m-Learning is Changing the Future of e-Learning - eLearning Industry

How m-Learning is Changing the Future of e-Learning - eLearning Industry | Culture Change | Scoop.it
Mobile learning (m-Learning) is changing how educators and learners access information. Read on to find out how developing m-learning can benefit you.

Via EDTC@UTB, Pekka Puhakka, Gebeyehu B. Amha, june holley
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, December 27, 2014 8:10 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, January 5, 6:02 PM

La preuve est que toute ma curation je la fais avec une tablette. 

Susana Quintas Rodriguez's curator insight, January 30, 10:27 AM

Cómo m-learning está cambiando el futuro del sector.

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The Dawn of System Leadership (SSIR)

The Dawn of System Leadership (SSIR) | Culture Change | Scoop.it
To solve society's most pressing problems requires a system leader who can catalyze collective leadership. Includes magazine extras.
Liz Rykert's insight:

System leaders are leaders who can see and understand the larger underlying dynamics feeding the culture one finds oneself in. This is a good read but misses all the great material from people like June Holley https://twitter.com/juneholley and the Leadership Learning Community http://leadershiplearning.org/ who have been thinking and working in this space for some time. 

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Evaluating Complexity: Propositions for Improving Practice - FSG

Evaluating Complexity: Propositions for Improving Practice - FSG | Culture Change | Scoop.it
Liz Rykert's insight:

Love the nine propositions outlined in this paper. Well worth the download and read through. They really are words to live by. I know they relate to evaluation of complex systems. But isn't evaluation really a chance to reflect and learn? And don't we all spend every day deeply engaged and interconnected in these complex networks all around us? 


Love that someone has really thought this through:

Characteristics of Complex Systems

Propositions for Evaluation

A complex system is always changing, often in unpredictable ways; it is never static

1 Design and implement evaluations to be adaptive, flexible, and iterative

Everything is connected; events in one part of the system affect all other parts

2 Seek to understand and describe the whole system, including components and connections

Information is the fuel that drives learning and helps the system thrive

3 Support the learning capacity of the system by strengthening feedback loops and improving access to information

Context matters; it can often make or break an initiative

4 Pay particular attention to context and be responsive to changes as they occur

Each situation is unique; best principles are more likely to be seen than best practices

5 Look for effective principles of practice in action, rather than assessing adherence to a predetermined set of activities

Different sources of energy and convergence can be observed at different times

6 Identify points of energy and influence, as well as ways in which momentum and power flow within the system

Relationships between entities are equally if not more important than the entities themselves

7 Focus on the nature of relationships
and interdependencies within the system

Cause and effect is not a linear, predicable, or one-directional process; it is much more iterative

8 Explain the non-linear and multi-directional relationships between the initiative and its intended and unintended outcomes

Patterns emerge from several semi-independent and diverse agents who are free to act in autonomous ways

9 Watch for patterns, both one-off and repeating, at different levels of the system

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RSA Animate - The Power of Networks - YouTube

In this RSA Animate from 2012, Manuel Lima, senior UX design lead at Microsoft Bing, explores the power of network visualisation to help navigate our complex moder...

Liz Rykert's insight:

Love the insights he brings on this and the use of rhizomes to understand the notions of organized complexity.

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Requisite Variety, Autopoiesis, and Self-organization

Ashby's law of requisite variety states that a controller must have at least as much variety (complexity) as the controlled. Maturana and Varela proposed autopoiesis (self-production) to define living systems. Living systems also require to fulfill the law of requisite variety. A measure of autopoiesis has been proposed as the ratio between the complexity of a system and the complexity of its environment. Self-organization can be used as a concept to guide the design of systems towards higher values of autopoiesis, with the potential of making technology more "living", i.e. adaptive and robust.


Requisite Variety, Autopoiesis, and Self-organization
Carlos Gershenson

http://arxiv.org/abs/1409.7475


Via Complexity Digest
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How Diversity Makes Us Smarter

How Diversity Makes Us Smarter | Culture Change | Scoop.it
Being around people who are different from us makes us more creative, more diligent and harder-working
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Charting culture

This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble

.The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The visualization was created by Maximilian Schich (University of Texas at Dallas) and Mauro Martino (IBM).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gIhRkCcD4U&index=1&list=PL7yuGPz_odjMW3YfSRkFRjoDdGsTrZDyD Read Nature's news story: http://www.nature.com/news/1.15650See Also: http://sco.lt/8by75F
Via Complexity Digest
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Constantina Vlachou's curator insight, April 28, 12:04 PM

An amazing video I just came across!

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FORUM2015: How to Use Storytelling To Change Culture | Social Enterprise

FORUM2015: How to Use Storytelling To Change Culture | Social Enterprise | Culture Change | Scoop.it
Liz Rykert's insight:

Nice short piece reporting on a session about Culture and the Role of Storytelling. Check out the resources at the end of the article. 

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Don’t Let Conflict Damage Your Culture

Don’t Let Conflict Damage Your Culture | Culture Change | Scoop.it

You know the types. There’s the office yeller, intimidating others with vitriolic rant. There’s the passive-aggressive underminer, nodding assent but then dragging her feet.


Via Alexis Assimacopoulos
Liz Rykert's insight:

Thanks for finding this resource Alexis! I love the work of Ed Schein. It has figured prominently in every culture change project I have worked on. So great to have it all together! 

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Can You Fix A Toxic Culture?

Can You Fix A Toxic Culture? | Culture Change | Scoop.it
Can you fix a toxic culture, or must you always quit your job and work someplace else? Liz Ryan explains

Via Alexis Assimacopoulos
Liz Rykert's insight:

It starts with speaking up and stepping out of the fear. Hard to do but important. 

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Brenda Zimmerman - Preventing Snap Back - YouTube

At the Collective Impact Summit held Oct 6-10 in Toronto, keynote speaker Brenda Zimmerman discussed 'Preventing Snap Back.' Brenda Zimmerman is the unpreced...
Liz Rykert's insight:

What is Snap Back? you might ask...

Snap back is the thing that happens when you have made a change effort and you find yourself returning to where you started rather than sustaining the change. This talk - given at the Collective Impact Summit in November 2014 is a helpful resource to gain insight on adaptive resilience and to understand how relational patterns of interaction are fractal in nature, meaning they can repeat at different levels. If you are working on large systems change this resource will be particularly useful. 15 mins.

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Don’t Talk About Culture. Do Culture. Be Culture.

Don’t Talk About Culture. Do Culture. Be Culture. | Culture Change | Scoop.it
You won’t build or change an organization’s culture by talking about what it ought to be. Sure, from time to time, you’ll want — and need — to emphasize positive aspects of your culture (or…
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Peer Coaching as a Tool for Culture Change

Peer Coaching as a Tool for Culture Change | Culture Change | Scoop.it
Sometimes the best approaches to revamp an organization’s culture come from the employee level, rather than edicts issued by senior executives.
Liz Rykert's insight:

The case for per coaching as a pathway to culture change.

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Spark the Change Winner - Mission-critical: a case study of GCHQ’s culture of innovation

Spark the Change Winner - Mission-critical: a case study of GCHQ’s culture of innovation | Culture Change | Scoop.it

@SparkConf


Via Riaz Khan
Liz Rykert's insight:

Check out this great Case Study on how one of Great Britain's Intelligence Agencies worked to introduce a culture of innovation. For me this is not just the notion of spurring a culture of failing fast and being creative but one that also encourages people to explore and then encourage each other rather than leaping to the conclusion "that won't work around here". 


Fav Segments:

1. Tame the Gator

"Part of this involved thinking about how people communicated and collaborated together. Worried by how often ideas got shot down at an early stage, one of the developers, Lambert, handed everyone on the team a little toy alligator. ‘We all have a “gater brain”’ he explained, ‘the flight or fight response that is triggered whenever we come across something new and which makes us dismiss or attack ideas. We needed to “tame the gater”. Now, if someone starts knocking an idea down rather than building on it – we chuck a toy ‘gater across the room. It’s fun, but it’s a serious reminder about how we communicate.’


2. Paradox of Intelligence and Secrecy - Go to External Sources!

"

One of the most unexpected was to launch a public call for bids. Initially run jointly with MI5, it invited companies and start-ups to bid on several broad problems – including how to verify people’s online identity; how to use open-source data to predict events and how to work securely in an insecure environment. As an experiment it has proved remarkably successful, bringing in a raft of new ideas and new relationships."


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Transformational Leadership - The Latest Thinking in Leading Effective Teams

Transformational Leadership - The Latest Thinking in Leading Effective Teams | Culture Change | Scoop.it
Understand what Transformational Leadership is and how to use it to really drive people-centred success.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, june holley
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John Thurlbeck, FCMI FRSA's curator insight, October 22, 2014 4:23 AM

Great re-scoop from Susan Bainbridge - love the graphic illustration and the simple descriptions! True transformational leadership begins, in my view, with the people ... and ends with the people!

Claude Emond's curator insight, October 25, 2014 12:06 AM

Praise for people-centered leaders

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, October 29, 2014 10:24 AM

There's nothing like the simplicity of a quadrant model to test your views of motivation and leadership, including transformational leadership, to boost us up and away from 20th century thinking that is no longer working well for us today.  ~  D

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Complexity and Community Change: Managing Adaptively to Improve Effectiveness

Complexity and Community Change:  Managing Adaptively to Improve Effectiveness | Culture Change | Scoop.it
The challenges of transforming distressed communities are heightened by the complexity of the problems community change actors address and the complexity of the environments in which they work. Confr
Liz Rykert's insight:

This new publication looks very helpful for bringing the insights of complexity to community groups and organizations. Written by Pat Auspos and Mark Cabaj for the Aspen Institute Roundtable for Community Change. Free download.

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Change your Culture One Behavior at a Time

Jon Katzenbach, Senior Executive Advisor at Strategy&, with more than 50 years of experience studying corporate culture, provides his insights on how changin...

Via Sharon Shakung, Alexis Assimacopoulos
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Innovation Excellence | Culture Eats Innovation for Lunch

Innovation Excellence | Culture Eats Innovation for Lunch | Culture Change | Scoop.it
A series of personal innovation stories from a new book by Luis Solis,
Liz Rykert's insight:

Thanks to Erika Bailey for this share. Important reminder about the role culture plays in organizations, especially those seeking innovative solutions and creativity.

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The Matthew effect in empirical data

The Matthew effect describes the phenomenon that in societies the rich tend to get richer and the potent even more powerful. It is closely related to the concept of preferential attachment in network science, where the more connected nodes are destined to acquire many more links in the future than the auxiliary nodes. Cumulative advantage and success-breads-success also both describe the fact that advantage tends to beget further advantage. The concept is behind the many power laws and scaling behaviour in empirical data, and it is at the heart of self-organization across social and natural sciences. Here we review the methodology for measuring preferential attachment in empirical data, as well as the observations of the Matthew effect in patterns of scientific collaboration, socio-technical and biological networks, the propagation of citations, the emergence of scientific progress and impact, career longevity, the evolution of common English words and phrases, as well as in education and brain development. We also discuss whether the Matthew effect is due to chance or optimisation, for example related to homophily in social systems or efficacy in technological systems, and we outline possible directions for future research.


The Matthew effect in empirical data
Matjaz Perc

http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.5124


Via Complexity Digest
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