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Bangladesh, ship business | Photojournalist | Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂

Bangladesh, ship business | Photojournalist | Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 | Culture and Food | Scoop.it

Ship breaking yards are the last resting place for end of life ships. At these yards, ships are scrapped, primarily for their steel content.
Until 1980s, ship breaking took place in the developed countries such as the United States, UK, and Europe. Today, however, most ship breaking yards are in developing nations, principally Bangladesh, China, and India, due to lower labor costs and less stringent environmental regulations dealing with the disposal of lead paint and other toxic substances.


Every year 600-700 sea vessels are brought to the beaches of Asia for scrapping and 52% of large ships are scrapped in Bangladesh.
Workers have no unions, no safety equipment, and no training. About 50 are said to die in accidents each year; often in explosions set off by blowtorches deep inside the fume-filled holds.


Via Photo report
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Photo report's curator insight, March 26, 2013 10:03 AM

Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 is a Japanese photojournalist currently working out of Beijing, China. Her clientele consists of The New York Times, MSNBC, Le Monde, the Chicago Tribune and the New York magazine, among others. She won the Grand Prize in Editor and Publisher Magazine’s Ninth Annual Photos of the Year contest in 2008. Fukada also won an Alicia Patterson Journalism Fellowship in 2010 to research and photograph Japan's disposable workers.

Fukada majored in English literature and first worked in fashion advertising as an account executive. She borrowed a 35 mm SLR camera and started making photos.

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'Lost tribe of Israel' found in Papua New Guinea?

'Lost tribe of Israel' found in Papua New Guinea? | Culture and Food | Scoop.it
Scholar known as "British Indiana Jones," Florida International University religious studies professor Tudor Parfitt: "The Gogodala wear yarmulkes [kippot] and prayer shawls.
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Rescooped by Fenny Ruth from PHOTOGRAPHERS
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Bangladesh, ship business | Photojournalist | Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂

Bangladesh, ship business | Photojournalist | Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 | Culture and Food | Scoop.it

Ship breaking yards are the last resting place for end of life ships. At these yards, ships are scrapped, primarily for their steel content.
Until 1980s, ship breaking took place in the developed countries such as the United States, UK, and Europe. Today, however, most ship breaking yards are in developing nations, principally Bangladesh, China, and India, due to lower labor costs and less stringent environmental regulations dealing with the disposal of lead paint and other toxic substances.


Every year 600-700 sea vessels are brought to the beaches of Asia for scrapping and 52% of large ships are scrapped in Bangladesh.
Workers have no unions, no safety equipment, and no training. About 50 are said to die in accidents each year; often in explosions set off by blowtorches deep inside the fume-filled holds.


Via Photo report
more...
Photo report's curator insight, March 26, 2013 10:03 AM

Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 is a Japanese photojournalist currently working out of Beijing, China. Her clientele consists of The New York Times, MSNBC, Le Monde, the Chicago Tribune and the New York magazine, among others. She won the Grand Prize in Editor and Publisher Magazine’s Ninth Annual Photos of the Year contest in 2008. Fukada also won an Alicia Patterson Journalism Fellowship in 2010 to research and photograph Japan's disposable workers.

Fukada majored in English literature and first worked in fashion advertising as an account executive. She borrowed a 35 mm SLR camera and started making photos.