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Curators Key Requirement: Critical Thinking

Robin Good: Critical thinking is a key strategic skill needed by any serious professional curator. 

 

"Critical thinking provides the keys for our own intellectual independence..." and it helps to move away from "rashy conclusions, mystification and reluctance to question received wisdom, authority and tradition" while learning how to adopt "intellectual discipline" and a way to express clearly ideas while taking personal responsibility for them.

 

Key takeaways from this video:

 

Critical thinking refers to a diverse range of intellectual skills and activities concerned with "evaluating information" as well as our own thought in a disciplined way.
  Critical thinking is not just thinking a lot. To be an effective critical thinker you need to seek out and be guided by "knowledge" and "evidence" that fits with reality even if it refutes what the general consensus may want to believe.
  Critical thinkers cultivate an attitude of curiosity and they are willing to do the work required to keep themselves informed about a subject.
  Critical thinkers do not take claims at face value but utilize scepticism and doubt to suspend judgement and objectively evaluate with facts the claims being made.
  Critical thinkers should evaluate information on the basis of reasoning and not by relying on emotions as claims the factuality of a claim cannot be solely based on the level of emotion that accompanies them or the fact that they may be believed by certain groups.

 

Highly recommended for all curators. 9/10

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OLPL5p0fMg 

 


Via Robin Good, Mayra Aixa Villar
Gregory Thackston's insight:

Critical thinking is a key component in addressing autonomous adversity and the need to collaborate in decision making.

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janlgordon's comment, February 20, 2012 1:59 PM
Great one Robin!
Beth Kanter's comment, February 21, 2012 11:56 PM
Thank you for sharing this video and the importance of critical thinking. It is so easy to get into the mindless consumption trap and making ourselves slow down, read, think, question, and seek is so important. It is all about the resisting the urge to click, but to hit the pause button and make yourself think
Mayra Aixa Villar's comment, February 22, 2012 10:14 AM
Grazie come sempre, Robin! You always share valuable information and this video is a great source to reflect on the importance of critical thinking to refine thought processes when curating content. Content curation certainly requires and develops "better thinking".

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Developing Five Kinds of Knowledge Through Five Kinds of Composing: Teaching to Exceed the Common Core State Standards - National Writing Project

Developing Five Kinds of Knowledge Through Five Kinds of Composing: Teaching to Exceed the Common Core State Standards - National Writing Project | Cultural sustainability and education | Scoop.it
Video Resource: Developing 5 Kinds of Knowledge Through 5 Kinds of Composing to Exceed Common Core: http://t.co/hSVENPoV #nwp #ccss

Via Darren Burris, Mary Clark, Les Howard, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Rescooped by Gregory Thackston from elearning&knowledge_management
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Curators Key Requirement: Critical Thinking

Robin Good: Critical thinking is a key strategic skill needed by any serious professional curator. 

 

"Critical thinking provides the keys for our own intellectual independence..." and it helps to move away from "rashy conclusions, mystification and reluctance to question received wisdom, authority and tradition" while learning how to adopt "intellectual discipline" and a way to express clearly ideas while taking personal responsibility for them.

 

Key takeaways from this video:

 

Critical thinking refers to a diverse range of intellectual skills and activities concerned with "evaluating information" as well as our own thought in a disciplined way.
  Critical thinking is not just thinking a lot. To be an effective critical thinker you need to seek out and be guided by "knowledge" and "evidence" that fits with reality even if it refutes what the general consensus may want to believe.
  Critical thinkers cultivate an attitude of curiosity and they are willing to do the work required to keep themselves informed about a subject.
  Critical thinkers do not take claims at face value but utilize scepticism and doubt to suspend judgement and objectively evaluate with facts the claims being made.
  Critical thinkers should evaluate information on the basis of reasoning and not by relying on emotions as claims the factuality of a claim cannot be solely based on the level of emotion that accompanies them or the fact that they may be believed by certain groups.

 

Highly recommended for all curators. 9/10

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OLPL5p0fMg 

 


Via Robin Good, Mayra Aixa Villar
Gregory Thackston's insight:

Critical thinking is a key component in addressing autonomous adversity and the need to collaborate in decision making.

more...
janlgordon's comment, February 20, 2012 1:59 PM
Great one Robin!
Beth Kanter's comment, February 21, 2012 11:56 PM
Thank you for sharing this video and the importance of critical thinking. It is so easy to get into the mindless consumption trap and making ourselves slow down, read, think, question, and seek is so important. It is all about the resisting the urge to click, but to hit the pause button and make yourself think
Mayra Aixa Villar's comment, February 22, 2012 10:14 AM
Grazie come sempre, Robin! You always share valuable information and this video is a great source to reflect on the importance of critical thinking to refine thought processes when curating content. Content curation certainly requires and develops "better thinking".
Rescooped by Gregory Thackston from Peer2Politics
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MOOCs and Open Education: Implications for Higher Education

MOOCs and Open Education: Implications for Higher Education | Cultural sustainability and education | Scoop.it

This report sets out to help decision makers in higher education institutions gain a better understanding of the phenomenon of Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) and trends towards greater openness in higher education and to think about the implications for their institutions. The phenomena of MOOCs are described, placing them in the wider context of open education, online learning and the changes that are currently taking place in higher education at a time of globalisation of education and constrained budgets. The report is written from a UK higher education perspective, but is largely informed by the developments in MOOCs from the USA and Canada. A literature review was undertaken focussing on the extensive reporting of MOOCs through blogs, press releases as well as openly available reports. This identified current debates about new course provision, the impact of changes in funding and the implications for greater openness in higher education. The theory of disruptive innovation is used to help form the questions of policy and strategy that higher education institutions need to address.


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Teaching With Technology - Ice-Breaker Ideas

Teaching With Technology - Ice-Breaker Ideas | Cultural sustainability and education | Scoop.it

If you were going to be a candy bar, what candy bar would you be? Are you a cat person or a dog person? Are you a Pepsi or Coke person? Just when would you ask such questions and why would you want to answer or want to know the answers to these questions from another person? When you are at the cash register waiting to be rung up? When you are at the hair dresser or the barber? Talking with your close friends? These questions may appear to be strange at first, but they have an uncanny way of "breaking" the ice (that uncomfortable silence or awkward conversation) when a group of people come together. In a learning community, ice breaker activities loosens the group dynamic with an engaging activity that pertains to the topic being studied or a topic that is completely irrelevant to the learning material. It causes people's shoulders to relax, mouths to grin, and warms up the room and provides a segue to the task or topic for discussion. Whether you are in a traditional classroom setting, or an online learning community, ice-breakers play a vital role in developing a sense of community in a learning environment.

 



Table of ContentsWelcomeDefining Ice-breakers and RationaleTypes of Ice-breakersConsider your technologies...Tips for Effective Ice-BreakersTechniques Did it Work? 


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Think-tank alliance identifies eight shifts for sustainable development | VibeGhana.com

A new international alliance of research institutes has identified eight major shifts that must take place for humanity to achieve sustainable development, according to a release from the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED...
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