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The Krampus Fairy

The Krampus Fairy | Cultural History | Scoop.it
There are many reasons to be a good archaeologist. The preservation of heritage sites is a noble endeavour, because it allows everyone (including everyone in the future) to access our shared histor...

Via David Connolly
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Info on Krampus -- and digs etc.

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Cultural History
The roots of culture; history and pre-history.
Curated by Deanna Dahlsad
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How Gangs Took Over Prisons

How Gangs Took Over Prisons | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Originally formed for self-protection, prison gangs have become the unlikely custodians of order behind bars—and of crime on the streets.

Via Concerned Citizen, Jocelyn Stoller
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Slate - How the Suburbs Got Poor

Slate - How the Suburbs Got Poor | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Before we can understand what makes some suburbs so miserable, we first have to understand what makes others succeed. The most successful suburban neighborhoods fall into two categories. First, there are the dense and walkable ones that, like the most successful urban neighborhoods, have town centers that give local residents easy access to retail and employment opportunities. These neighborhoods generally include a mix of single-family homes and apartment buildings, which allows for different kinds of families and adults at different stages of life to share in the same local amenities. The problem with these urban suburbs, as Christopher Leinberger recounts in his 2009 book The Option of Urbanism, is that there are so few of them, and this scarcity fuels the same kind of gentrification that is driving poor people out of successful cities.

 

The other model for success can be found in sprawling suburban neighborhoods dominated by households with either the time or the resources to maintain single-family homes and to engage in civic life. As a general rule, the neighborhoods in this latter category don’t allow for apartment buildings or townhomes on small lots. They implement stringent local land-use regulations that keep them exclusive, and they attract families that tenaciously defend the character of their neighborhoods.


Via Mathijs Booden, Jukka Melaranta
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Mamie Davis's comment, September 13, 12:18 AM
I really do think you desire as an adult what you grew up with as a child, especially if happy memories are associated with it. I grew up in a large house with a one acre yard of green grass, flowers, garden, garage, shed. We could see our neighbor's houses but they were far away enough that we didn't feel claustraphobic is we out in our yards at the same time. My parents also put up little shrubs around our yard to add to the feeling of privacy. However my friend from Spain, who I imagined lived in a house with a yard too for an entire year prior to visiting his family, lives in a flat in an apartment building. It is completely normal to him to live in a place like that your whole life. When I asked him where he went to be outside, relax and enjoy the sunshine he said they went to the street or the neighborhood center. He said only rich people lived in houses and had yards in places where you have little contact with neighbors. What I am saying is that we desire what we had as children, that the economics of our parents time and allowed them to get the place they have made an impression on us and our expectation about our future.
Rob Duke's comment, September 13, 1:02 PM
Yes, I'd agree as humans, we have a sense of place and we like what feels familiar. I've also found that public places are better when truly public. Alleys and underpasses; or those little pocket parks are not nearly as safe as laces that feel like they have "eye" (windows and door where people might be looking). As a chief, I attended planning sessions and insisted on a Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) planning approach. Thus, pockete parks became little "P" shaped culdesacs where the homes all faced the grass patch in the middle (narrow streets with parking only allowed on one side kept speeds low. Sinking the park area can also keep balls from bouncing into the street and serves as a temporary storm drainage retention pond). I'm still not convinced that even a well-designed neighborhood won't eventually become tarnished. In some ways, there's a life cycle where things become run-down for a time and then get rediscovered by a new generation of young families. Having said that I think watching the store to ensure there's a good jobs/housing mix and good design will help neighborhoods maintain their appeal.
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Let us never forget

Let us never forget | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Little Alida Baruch a few months old, taken shortly before she was deported with her parents to Auschwitz on July 16th, 1942.

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The End of the Negro Writer: Julian Mayfield, John Henrik Clarke, and James Baldwin

Dr. Lawrence Jackson, Professor of English and African American Studies at Emory University and author of The Indignant Generation: A Narrative History of African American Writers and Critics, 1934-1960

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The Anti-Lynching Pamphlets of Ida B. Wells, 1892-1920

The Anti-Lynching Pamphlets of Ida B. Wells, 1892-1920 | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Pamphlets written by Ida B. Wells-Barnett on the subject of lynching comprise a substantial body of innovative writing, reporting, and analysis in U.S. intellectual history. In the 1890s especially, nascent professional social scientists, media opinion shapers, and leaders in the black community acknowledged and relied on her work.1 Indeed, Ida B. Wells-Barnett's foundational insights into the complex social dynamics behind the lynching for rape scenario have stood the test of time in the more than one hundred years since she penned them; yet her status and recognition as a social critic in the ensuing years has been embattled, to say the least.2 At her death in 1931, for example, W.E.B. Du Bois wrote in National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's (NAACP) journal, The Crisis, that her work had been "easily forgotten" and "taken to greater success" by others.3 Wells-Barnett herself complained in a diary of the neglect of "my anti-lynching contribution" in early black history textbooks penned by the influential scholar Carter G. Woodson.4 This essay suggests that rather than comprising a "forgotten" body work, Ida B. Wells-Barnett's pamphlet writings were appropriated and transformed by peers and colleagues in social reform. In turn, they marginalized her as author and leader.

Deanna Dahlsad's insight:

In honor of Ida's birthday. For books by & about Ida B. Wells-Barnett, go here.

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, July 16, 7:00 PM

In honor of Ida's birthday. For books by & about Ida B. Wells-Barnett, go here.

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Bath: The Great War in Costume

Bath: The Great War in Costume | Cultural History | Scoop.it

19 July - 31 August 2014


"The war is usually seen through military eyes.  However, it could not have been won without the efforts of millions of women. They proved what they could do  – what took a great deal longer was to convince everyone that they should do it."


‘Fighting on the Home Front:  The Legacy of Women in WorldWar One’  by  Kate  Adie, (Hodder &  Stoughton)

 

World War I changed women’s life forever; in terms of status, class, position and what was acceptable for a woman to wear. Fashion changed with the innovation of women being required to do men’s work. The corset disappeared and trousers became a norm.



Via Thomas-Penette Michel
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A hundred years of American politics, in one GIF

A hundred years of American politics, in one GIF | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Watch the political landscape change under our feet.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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How the 19th Century's 1 Percent Lived Large

How the 19th Century's 1 Percent Lived Large | Cultural History | Scoop.it
When it comes to luxurious living, the upper crust of the late 1800s make today’s “1 percent” seem modest by comparison. Even though modern necessities like indoor plumbing and flush toilets were just starting to make their appearances, the 19th century elite enjoyed luxuries that are still astounding (or confounding) more than a century later.… Read more

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from In The Name Of God
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Theories of religion: The early years

Theories of religion: The early years | Cultural History | Scoop.it
This week we’re looking at three early anthropologists who believed that cultures evolve from “primitive” to “civilized” stages, and that religion is a characteristic of the earlier stages. Excelsior!

Via Jocelyn Stoller, Deanna Dahlsad
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Historian casts doubt on Christopher Columbus account of Santa Maria shipwreck - Telegraph

Historian casts doubt on Christopher Columbus account of Santa Maria shipwreck - Telegraph | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Expert claims remains of ship recently found off Haiti cannot be Spanish explorer's vessel because it never really sank

Via KEpps, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks, Jukka Melaranta
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The reality of being a black woman: A response to Ernest Baker

The reality of being a black woman: A response to Ernest Baker | Cultural History | Scoop.it

“I’m pretty sure if you get in your Delorean and go back to the point where any colonized people first encountered the white man, the thought was not “That’s fucking attractive!” It was more like “What is that yellow haired thing with the demon eyes?!”

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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


Via Seth Dixon, Deanna Dahlsad
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steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 6:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 6:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 4:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Community Village World History
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Chinese Exclusion Act

Chinese Exclusion Act | Cultural History | Scoop.it


"The Chinese Exclusion Act (1882) was a US law that shut off all immigration from China to the US except for scholars, merchants, diplomats and professionals. It is where the American idea of “illegal aliens” comes from, the beginning of the country’s racist immigration policies.


At first immigration from China was limited, then Japan and Korea (1907), then the Asiatic Barred Zone (1917) and then southern and eastern Europe (1924). On top of that, Chinese and Mexicans were being driven out by violence and deportation.


That is why the US was so lily-white in the 1950s. Some think of that as the “natural” state of the country, but it was the creation of a set of racist policies that began with the Chinese Exclusion Act, policies that were not overturned till 1965."



Via Community Village Sites
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Community Village Sites's curator insight, June 3, 4:20 PM


There was a China town in San Jose, CA (south of San Francisco) that burned down – twice! It is no longer there. However, there is a small Japan Town now in San Jose and a ‘Little Saigon’.


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Beware of Artists

Beware of Artists | Cultural History | Scoop.it
collective-history:
“ “Beware of Artists” - Actual poster issued by Senator Joseph McCarthy in 1950s, at height of the red scare.
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"The Challenge Of The 50s -- Years Of Crisis"

"The Challenge Of The 50s -- Years Of Crisis" | Cultural History | Scoop.it

For those of you who prefer to think of the 1950s as an idyllic time, one to romance over, there were issues and crises. In fact, one of them was regarding journalism itself

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Haunting Photographs of Artifacts From the Hiroshima Atomic Blast

Haunting Photographs of Artifacts From the Hiroshima Atomic Blast | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Through Ishiuchi Miyako’s lens, the things we leave behind are not merely totems of ourselves, but rather objects with lives of their own. An upcoming exhibit at Andrew Roth gallery presents “Here and Now: Atomic Bomb Artifacts, ひろしま/Hiroshima 1945/2007—,” Ishiuchi's photos of objects in the archive of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum.
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World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography

World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography | Cultural History | Scoop.it

"More Americans came into contact with maps during World War II than in any previous moment in American history. From the elaborate and innovative inserts in the National Geographic to the schematic and tactical pictures in newspapers, maps were everywhere. On September 1, 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland, and by the end of the day a map of Europe could not be bought anywhere in the United States. In fact, Rand McNally reported selling more maps and atlases of the European theaters in the first two weeks of September than in all the years since the armistice of 1918. Two years later, the attack on Pearl Harbor again sparked a demand for maps."


Via Seth Dixon
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Pierre Mongin 's curator insight, July 20, 12:54 PM

Un exemple sur la manière dont les cartes peuvent changer votre vision du monde, le " mapping" a ce pouvoir là. 

Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 7:04 AM

Global interaction and maps. WWII. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 3:59 PM

APHG-U1

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Do You Have to Learn How to Get High? » Sociological Images

Do You Have to Learn How to Get High? » Sociological Images | Cultural History | Scoop.it

If you stop and think about it, alcohol is just the worst. Almost every one who drinks has experienced the pain of a mean morning hangover (at least once). Also, the experience of being drunk… why is that enjoyable? When drunk you slur your words, it’s hard to think straight, you’re liable to say or do something that will offend the people around you, and you can’t legally drive a car. Why does any of that sound like a good way to spend a Friday night?


To a sociologist, the reason people drink alcohol is that they have been socially taught to.

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An Astonishing Catalog of the Violence Committed Against “Freedom Summer” Participants in a Single Mississippi Town

An Astonishing Catalog of the Violence Committed Against “Freedom Summer” Participants in a Single Mississippi Town | Cultural History | Scoop.it
This “Incident Summary” details acts of harassment, big and small, reported by civil rights activists and allies working in McComb, Miss. in the summer of 1964.
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50 Years *sigh*

50 Years *sigh* | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Today, June 21st, is my birthday; I turn 50. I feel pretty much the same way I did when I wrote this two years ago, "A lifetime of so little progress is just too much."; only more so. *sigh* I was ...
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Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled

Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled | Cultural History | Scoop.it

"Unfortunately, most world political maps aren't telling you the whole story. The idea that the earth's land is cleanly divvied up into nation-states - one country for each of the world's peoples - is more an imaginative ideal than a reality. Read on to learn about five ways your map is lying to you about borders, territories, and even the roster of the world's countries."


Via Seth Dixon
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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 23, 3:32 PM

Amazing stories on the World's changing Geopolitical status. Current stories about disputed borders, unrecognised territories and  newly declared nations.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 29, 6:41 PM

Nunca é "Toda a Verdade" ... 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 4:49 PM

APHG-U1

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The Gender-Bending History of the High Heel - Slate Magazine (blog)

The Gender-Bending History of the High Heel - Slate Magazine (blog) | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine (blog)
The Gender-Bending History of the High Heel
Slate Magazine (blog)
Heels—deemed the epitome of female irrationality and superficiality—went out of fashion for a very, very long time.

Via Emre Erdogan
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A forgotten Belgian genius dreamed up the internet over 100 years ago

A forgotten Belgian genius dreamed up the internet over 100 years ago | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Though we're pretty sure that time travelers don't exist, people were working on hypertext -- used by web browsers to retrieve connected information --
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Evangelical Renaissance

Evangelical Renaissance | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Steven P. Miller: Since the 1970s, the words “evangelical” and “born again” have been weapons, foils, or badges of honor, depending on their wielders.
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DNA From 12,000-Year-Old Skeleton Helps Answer the Question: Who Were the First Americans?

DNA From 12,000-Year-Old Skeleton Helps Answer the Question: Who Were the First Americans? | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Some 12,000 years ago, a teenage girl took a walk in what’s now the Yucatan Peninsula and fell 190 feet into a deep pit, breaking her pelvis and likely killing her instantly. Over time, the pit—part of an elaborate limestone cave system—became a watery grave as the most recent ice age ended, glaciers melted and sea levels rose.


In 2007, cave divers happened upon her remarkably preserved remains, which form the oldest, most complete and genetically intact human skeleton in the New World. Her bones, according to new research published in Science, hold the key to a question that has long plagued scientists: Who were the first Americans?


Prevailing ideas point to all Native Americans descending from ancient Siberians who moved across the Beringia land bridge between Asia and North America between 26,000 and 18,000 years ago. As time wore on, the thinking goes, these people spread southward and gave rise to the Native American populations encountered by European settlers centuries ago.


But therein lies a puzzle: "Modern Native Americans closely resemble people of China, Korea, and Japan… but the oldest American skeletons do not," says archaeologist and paleontologist James Chatters, lead author on the study and the owner of Applied Paleoscience, a research consulting service based in Bothell, Washington.


The small number of early American specimens discovered so far have smaller and shorter faces and longer and narrower skulls than later Native Americans, more closely resembling the modern people of Africa, Australia, and the South Pacific. "This has led to speculation that perhaps the first Americans and Native Americans came from different homelands," Chatters continues, "or migrated from Asia at different stages in their evolution."


The newly discovered skeleton—named Naia by the divers who discovered her, after the Greek for water—should help to settle this speculation. Though her skull is shaped like those of other early Americans, she shares a DNA sequence with some modern Native Americans. In other words, she’s likely a genetic great-aunt to indigenous people currently found in the Americas.


The new genetic evidence from Naia supports the hypothesis that the first people in America all came from northeast Asia by crossing a land bridge known as Beringia. When sea levels rose after the last Ice Age, the land bridge disappeared.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Jocelyn Stoller
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