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Program teaches history via beloved quilter, 'Pioneer Girl' Grace Snyder

Program teaches history via beloved quilter, 'Pioneer Girl' Grace Snyder | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Grace Snyder's lively eyes gaze out of her 1903 wedding photograph. There's an astonishing hat atop her head and a tiny, cat-got-the-cream smile on her lips. She perches just behind her cowboy husband, her clasped hands resting near his left shoulder.


            Her story, in many respects, mirrors Nebraska's history in the late 19thcentury and much of the 20th century.


            Born in 1882, reared in a sod house on a Custer County homestead and married to a Sandhills cowboy and rancher, she recounted her pioneer life in the 1963 book "No Time on My Hands," as told to her daughter, author Nellie Snyder Yost.


            Along the way, she became nationally known for her quilting expertise. Two of her quilts were designated as among the 100 best 20th-century quilts by Quilters Newsletter Magazine in 1999. She was named to the National Quilters Hall of Fame in 1980, two years before her death at 100.


            Now Grace Snyder is the focal point of an innovative new history curriculum developed jointly by NET Learning Services, the International Quilt Study Center and Museum at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the Nebraska State Historical Society.


            Called "Tiny Stitches, Big Life," the online multimedia project uses Snyder's quilts and her life experiences to bring pioneer history to life for Nebraska elementary school students. It is the first module of a larger project, "Stories of Nebraska Quilters," with plans to develop additional material about other Nebraskans who are remembered through their quilts.

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Using objects to engage students.

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Cultural History
The roots of culture; history and pre-history.
Curated by Deanna Dahlsad
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The End of the Negro Writer: Julian Mayfield, John Henrik Clarke, and James Baldwin

Dr. Lawrence Jackson, Professor of English and African American Studies at Emory University and author of The Indignant Generation: A Narrative History of African American Writers and Critics, 1934-1960

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The Anti-Lynching Pamphlets of Ida B. Wells, 1892-1920

The Anti-Lynching Pamphlets of Ida B. Wells, 1892-1920 | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Pamphlets written by Ida B. Wells-Barnett on the subject of lynching comprise a substantial body of innovative writing, reporting, and analysis in U.S. intellectual history. In the 1890s especially, nascent professional social scientists, media opinion shapers, and leaders in the black community acknowledged and relied on her work.1 Indeed, Ida B. Wells-Barnett's foundational insights into the complex social dynamics behind the lynching for rape scenario have stood the test of time in the more than one hundred years since she penned them; yet her status and recognition as a social critic in the ensuing years has been embattled, to say the least.2 At her death in 1931, for example, W.E.B. Du Bois wrote in National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's (NAACP) journal, The Crisis, that her work had been "easily forgotten" and "taken to greater success" by others.3 Wells-Barnett herself complained in a diary of the neglect of "my anti-lynching contribution" in early black history textbooks penned by the influential scholar Carter G. Woodson.4 This essay suggests that rather than comprising a "forgotten" body work, Ida B. Wells-Barnett's pamphlet writings were appropriated and transformed by peers and colleagues in social reform. In turn, they marginalized her as author and leader.

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In honor of Ida's birthday. For books by & about Ida B. Wells-Barnett, go here.

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, July 16, 7:00 PM

In honor of Ida's birthday. For books by & about Ida B. Wells-Barnett, go here.

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Bath: The Great War in Costume

Bath: The Great War in Costume | Cultural History | Scoop.it

19 July - 31 August 2014


"The war is usually seen through military eyes.  However, it could not have been won without the efforts of millions of women. They proved what they could do  – what took a great deal longer was to convince everyone that they should do it."


‘Fighting on the Home Front:  The Legacy of Women in WorldWar One’  by  Kate  Adie, (Hodder &  Stoughton)

 

World War I changed women’s life forever; in terms of status, class, position and what was acceptable for a woman to wear. Fashion changed with the innovation of women being required to do men’s work. The corset disappeared and trousers became a norm.



Via Thomas-Penette Michel
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A hundred years of American politics, in one GIF

A hundred years of American politics, in one GIF | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Watch the political landscape change under our feet.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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How the 19th Century's 1 Percent Lived Large

How the 19th Century's 1 Percent Lived Large | Cultural History | Scoop.it
When it comes to luxurious living, the upper crust of the late 1800s make today’s “1 percent” seem modest by comparison. Even though modern necessities like indoor plumbing and flush toilets were just starting to make their appearances, the 19th century elite enjoyed luxuries that are still astounding (or confounding) more than a century later.… Read more

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Theories of religion: The early years

Theories of religion: The early years | Cultural History | Scoop.it
This week we’re looking at three early anthropologists who believed that cultures evolve from “primitive” to “civilized” stages, and that religion is a characteristic of the earlier stages. Excelsior!

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Historian casts doubt on Christopher Columbus account of Santa Maria shipwreck - Telegraph

Historian casts doubt on Christopher Columbus account of Santa Maria shipwreck - Telegraph | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Expert claims remains of ship recently found off Haiti cannot be Spanish explorer's vessel because it never really sank

Via KEpps, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks, Jukka Melaranta
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The reality of being a black woman: A response to Ernest Baker

The reality of being a black woman: A response to Ernest Baker | Cultural History | Scoop.it

“I’m pretty sure if you get in your Delorean and go back to the point where any colonized people first encountered the white man, the thought was not “That’s fucking attractive!” It was more like “What is that yellow haired thing with the demon eyes?!”

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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


Via Seth Dixon, Deanna Dahlsad
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steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 6:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 6:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 4:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

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Chinese Exclusion Act

Chinese Exclusion Act | Cultural History | Scoop.it


"The Chinese Exclusion Act (1882) was a US law that shut off all immigration from China to the US except for scholars, merchants, diplomats and professionals. It is where the American idea of “illegal aliens” comes from, the beginning of the country’s racist immigration policies.


At first immigration from China was limited, then Japan and Korea (1907), then the Asiatic Barred Zone (1917) and then southern and eastern Europe (1924). On top of that, Chinese and Mexicans were being driven out by violence and deportation.


That is why the US was so lily-white in the 1950s. Some think of that as the “natural” state of the country, but it was the creation of a set of racist policies that began with the Chinese Exclusion Act, policies that were not overturned till 1965."



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Community Village's curator insight, June 3, 4:20 PM


There was a China town in San Jose, CA (south of San Francisco) that burned down – twice! It is no longer there. However, there is a small Japan Town now in San Jose and a ‘Little Saigon’.


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Statement made by Osama Nakata, 5/31/1944 (Statements of United States Citizens of Japanese Ancestry)

Statement made by Osama Nakata, 5/31/1944 (Statements of United States Citizens of Japanese Ancestry) | Cultural History | Scoop.it
todaysdocument: “ “ “I am willing to preserve the principles of democracy and freedom” Statement made by Osama Nakata, 5/31/1944; Statements of United States Citizens of Japanese Ancestry, Records of...
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Did you know that George Washington Carver, the master scientist, was physically castrated at a very young ag by his White plantation owners?

Did you know that George Washington Carver, the master scientist, was physically castrated at a very young ag by his White plantation owners? | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Back male slaves that were assigned to work in their master’s house were often castrated. 

Although it was the white slave owner that were raping their black slaves (males, females and children ) they —with an absurd degree of hypocrisy —believed that black males were sexual deviant that could not control their sexual urges.


The slave owners therefor believe that such castration of innocent Black boys was necessary to protect their daughters and...

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What were Tolkien's politics? The Letters of J.R.R.Tolkien

What were Tolkien's politics? The Letters of J.R.R.Tolkien | Cultural History | Scoop.it
What do the letters of J.R.R.Tolkien tell us about his politics.
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World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography

World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography | Cultural History | Scoop.it

"More Americans came into contact with maps during World War II than in any previous moment in American history. From the elaborate and innovative inserts in the National Geographic to the schematic and tactical pictures in newspapers, maps were everywhere. On September 1, 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland, and by the end of the day a map of Europe could not be bought anywhere in the United States. In fact, Rand McNally reported selling more maps and atlases of the European theaters in the first two weeks of September than in all the years since the armistice of 1918. Two years later, the attack on Pearl Harbor again sparked a demand for maps."


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Siva Net's curator insight, July 18, 10:24 AM

Dryer,Pully rope cloth Dryer,Ceiling Mounted cloth dryer,and Pondicherry- Ceiling clothes dryer,Pull and dry,Up and Down Dry,Rope pullying cloth Cuddalore,Thindivanam,Villupuram 9788538851 - Pondicherry

Future Win Associates introducing Rope pulling clothes Drying System Short on space? Hang your clothes from the ceiling..Suits good in Balcony, Service area, Passage

 Future Win Associates Clothes lines ceiling mounted dryer is able to conveniently hang your clothes in areas where you do not have floor space.

The clotheslines are made of Quality Aluminum pipes,

Which mean that the rusting or oxidation of pipes does not occur quickly like mild steel,

thus it is even stronger and more durable! Each individual

Aluminum steel pipe is raised and lowered by a Plastic cord, for easy hanging separately as needed.

The neat compact design allows it to be installed in many different areas like passage, bedroom, bathroom, or in balconies.

Available in 4to 9 feet lengths.

1)Branded System with Warranty.

2)Each rod can be roller separately.

 3)Perfect for Apartment Balconies ,Service areas& passages,

4)Easily removable and Re- Installable

5)Made of Super grade quality Aluminum Tubes with rust proof

6)Allows you to enjoy the view from your balcony.

7)Prevent fading your branded clothes from sunlight and dust & Rain

Pierre Mongin 's curator insight, July 20, 12:54 PM

Un exemple sur la manière dont les cartes peuvent changer votre vision du monde, le " mapping" a ce pouvoir là. 

Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 7:04 AM

Global interaction and maps. WWII. 

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Do You Have to Learn How to Get High? » Sociological Images

Do You Have to Learn How to Get High? » Sociological Images | Cultural History | Scoop.it

If you stop and think about it, alcohol is just the worst. Almost every one who drinks has experienced the pain of a mean morning hangover (at least once). Also, the experience of being drunk… why is that enjoyable? When drunk you slur your words, it’s hard to think straight, you’re liable to say or do something that will offend the people around you, and you can’t legally drive a car. Why does any of that sound like a good way to spend a Friday night?


To a sociologist, the reason people drink alcohol is that they have been socially taught to.

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An Astonishing Catalog of the Violence Committed Against “Freedom Summer” Participants in a Single Mississippi Town

An Astonishing Catalog of the Violence Committed Against “Freedom Summer” Participants in a Single Mississippi Town | Cultural History | Scoop.it
This “Incident Summary” details acts of harassment, big and small, reported by civil rights activists and allies working in McComb, Miss. in the summer of 1964.
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50 Years *sigh*

50 Years *sigh* | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Today, June 21st, is my birthday; I turn 50. I feel pretty much the same way I did when I wrote this two years ago, "A lifetime of so little progress is just too much."; only more so. *sigh* I was ...
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Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled

Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled | Cultural History | Scoop.it

"Unfortunately, most world political maps aren't telling you the whole story. The idea that the earth's land is cleanly divvied up into nation-states - one country for each of the world's peoples - is more an imaginative ideal than a reality. Read on to learn about five ways your map is lying to you about borders, territories, and even the roster of the world's countries."


Via Seth Dixon
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David Smart's curator insight, June 23, 3:26 PM

add your insight...

Sally Egan's curator insight, June 23, 3:32 PM

Amazing stories on the World's changing Geopolitical status. Current stories about disputed borders, unrecognised territories and  newly declared nations.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 29, 6:41 PM

Nunca é "Toda a Verdade" ... 

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The Gender-Bending History of the High Heel - Slate Magazine (blog)

The Gender-Bending History of the High Heel - Slate Magazine (blog) | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine (blog)
The Gender-Bending History of the High Heel
Slate Magazine (blog)
Heels—deemed the epitome of female irrationality and superficiality—went out of fashion for a very, very long time.

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A forgotten Belgian genius dreamed up the internet over 100 years ago

A forgotten Belgian genius dreamed up the internet over 100 years ago | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Though we're pretty sure that time travelers don't exist, people were working on hypertext -- used by web browsers to retrieve connected information --
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Evangelical Renaissance

Evangelical Renaissance | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Steven P. Miller: Since the 1970s, the words “evangelical” and “born again” have been weapons, foils, or badges of honor, depending on their wielders.
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DNA From 12,000-Year-Old Skeleton Helps Answer the Question: Who Were the First Americans?

DNA From 12,000-Year-Old Skeleton Helps Answer the Question: Who Were the First Americans? | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Some 12,000 years ago, a teenage girl took a walk in what’s now the Yucatan Peninsula and fell 190 feet into a deep pit, breaking her pelvis and likely killing her instantly. Over time, the pit—part of an elaborate limestone cave system—became a watery grave as the most recent ice age ended, glaciers melted and sea levels rose.


In 2007, cave divers happened upon her remarkably preserved remains, which form the oldest, most complete and genetically intact human skeleton in the New World. Her bones, according to new research published in Science, hold the key to a question that has long plagued scientists: Who were the first Americans?


Prevailing ideas point to all Native Americans descending from ancient Siberians who moved across the Beringia land bridge between Asia and North America between 26,000 and 18,000 years ago. As time wore on, the thinking goes, these people spread southward and gave rise to the Native American populations encountered by European settlers centuries ago.


But therein lies a puzzle: "Modern Native Americans closely resemble people of China, Korea, and Japan… but the oldest American skeletons do not," says archaeologist and paleontologist James Chatters, lead author on the study and the owner of Applied Paleoscience, a research consulting service based in Bothell, Washington.


The small number of early American specimens discovered so far have smaller and shorter faces and longer and narrower skulls than later Native Americans, more closely resembling the modern people of Africa, Australia, and the South Pacific. "This has led to speculation that perhaps the first Americans and Native Americans came from different homelands," Chatters continues, "or migrated from Asia at different stages in their evolution."


The newly discovered skeleton—named Naia by the divers who discovered her, after the Greek for water—should help to settle this speculation. Though her skull is shaped like those of other early Americans, she shares a DNA sequence with some modern Native Americans. In other words, she’s likely a genetic great-aunt to indigenous people currently found in the Americas.


The new genetic evidence from Naia supports the hypothesis that the first people in America all came from northeast Asia by crossing a land bridge known as Beringia. When sea levels rose after the last Ice Age, the land bridge disappeared.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Jocelyn Stoller
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D-day landings scenes in 1944 and now – interactive

D-day landings scenes in 1944 and now – interactive | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Peter
Macdiarmid has taken photographs of locations in
France and England to match with archive images taken before, during and after the D-day landings

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Straight Razors and Social Justice: The Empowering Evolution of Black Barbershops

Straight Razors and Social Justice: The Empowering Evolution of Black Barbershops | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Mills spent the next decade researching the barbershop trade for his book, Cutting Along the Color Line: Black Barbers and Barber Shops in A...

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Kingdom of Hawaii

Kingdom of Hawaii | Cultural History | Scoop.it


"The Kingdom of Hawaii(1810-1893) was what Hawaii was before it fell under American rule.


Native Hawaiians are Polynesians. They arrived in the Hawaiian islands in the time of the Roman Empire, probably from the Marquesas Islands. They knew how to sail across the ocean by the stars – long before Europeans did. They brought bananas, chickens, pigs, dogs, coconuts, taro and breadfruit. The islands already had goats and boars. Another wave of Polynesians came from Tahiti in the 1200s."



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