Cultural History
1.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Cultural History
The roots of culture; history and pre-history.
Curated by Deanna Dahlsad
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deanna Dahlsad
Scoop.it!

The Mystery of Extraordinarily Accurate Medieval Maps

The Mystery of Extraordinarily Accurate Medieval Maps | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Beautifully detailed portolan charts present historians with a puzzle: How were they made? A mathematical analysis offers some clues.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Human Interest
Scoop.it!

Scientists Reveal the Real Face of King Tut

Scientists Reveal the Real Face of King Tut | Cultural History | Scoop.it
He was probably ugly.

Via Shonda Brock, Jukka Melaranta
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Archaeology News
Scoop.it!

Mummified Fetus Reveals Ancient Surgical Procedure

Mummified Fetus Reveals Ancient Surgical Procedure | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Overall, the archaeologists found 34 shallow graves with seven male adults, three male infants, and one female child, roughly 1,000 years old.


Via David Connolly
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
Scoop.it!

DNA From 12,000-Year-Old Skeleton Helps Answer the Question: Who Were the First Americans?

DNA From 12,000-Year-Old Skeleton Helps Answer the Question: Who Were the First Americans? | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Some 12,000 years ago, a teenage girl took a walk in what’s now the Yucatan Peninsula and fell 190 feet into a deep pit, breaking her pelvis and likely killing her instantly. Over time, the pit—part of an elaborate limestone cave system—became a watery grave as the most recent ice age ended, glaciers melted and sea levels rose.


In 2007, cave divers happened upon her remarkably preserved remains, which form the oldest, most complete and genetically intact human skeleton in the New World. Her bones, according to new research published in Science, hold the key to a question that has long plagued scientists: Who were the first Americans?


Prevailing ideas point to all Native Americans descending from ancient Siberians who moved across the Beringia land bridge between Asia and North America between 26,000 and 18,000 years ago. As time wore on, the thinking goes, these people spread southward and gave rise to the Native American populations encountered by European settlers centuries ago.


But therein lies a puzzle: "Modern Native Americans closely resemble people of China, Korea, and Japan… but the oldest American skeletons do not," says archaeologist and paleontologist James Chatters, lead author on the study and the owner of Applied Paleoscience, a research consulting service based in Bothell, Washington.


The small number of early American specimens discovered so far have smaller and shorter faces and longer and narrower skulls than later Native Americans, more closely resembling the modern people of Africa, Australia, and the South Pacific. "This has led to speculation that perhaps the first Americans and Native Americans came from different homelands," Chatters continues, "or migrated from Asia at different stages in their evolution."


The newly discovered skeleton—named Naia by the divers who discovered her, after the Greek for water—should help to settle this speculation. Though her skull is shaped like those of other early Americans, she shares a DNA sequence with some modern Native Americans. In other words, she’s likely a genetic great-aunt to indigenous people currently found in the Americas.


The new genetic evidence from Naia supports the hypothesis that the first people in America all came from northeast Asia by crossing a land bridge known as Beringia. When sea levels rose after the last Ice Age, the land bridge disappeared.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Jocelyn Stoller
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Strange days indeed...
Scoop.it!

How A Cryptoanalyst Discovered The Identity Of The Man In The Iron Mask

How A Cryptoanalyst Discovered The Identity Of The Man In The Iron Mask | Cultural History | Scoop.it
For those of you who have only seen the Leonardo DiCaprio movie, the Man in the Iron Mask was an actual historical figure. He was a mysterious prisoner in the time of Louis XIV.

Via F. Thunus
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deanna Dahlsad
Scoop.it!

Great women of science 

Great women of science  | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Great women of science
Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958) - British biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNA,...
Deanna Dahlsad's insight:

Click for all

more...
Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Human Evolution
Scoop.it!

Which Genes Did We Get From Neandertals?

Which Genes Did We Get From Neandertals? | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Ancient mixed couples gave us key genes but were partially genetically incompatible, two new studies suggest

Via Religulous
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deanna Dahlsad
Scoop.it!

Body Snatchers of Old New York

Body Snatchers of Old New York | Cultural History | Scoop.it

There was a lot to be afraid of in New York after the Revolutionary War. Burned buildings loomed out of dark, crooked streets, which met at strange angles. Fights broke out in the taverns, while thieves lurked in the shadows. Families huddled in shantytowns constructed out of ships’ canvasses, while garbage piled high on the corners. The city watch was nothing more than forty men with clubs.


Besides the thieves and the brawls, people feared the medical students. The young men in black suits who studied at Columbia College and New York Hospital did as their teachers from England and Scotland had done: they learned anatomy by dissecting bodies stolen from the local cemeteries. In London and Edinburgh, a quasi-professional class of grave-robbers known as the “Resurrection Men” dug fresh corpses from the cemeteries of the poor and brought them to the medical school. In eighteenth-century New York, the medical students robbed the graves themselves, sneaking into cemeteries on cold, moonless nights and carrying wooden shovels to avoid the loud scrape of metal on stone.


But the bodies on the dissecting tables in New York often had a different hue than the bodies in Europe.

Deanna Dahlsad's insight:

African - American slaves still serving after death.

more...
Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, December 2, 2013 5:27 PM

African - American slaves still serving after death.

Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, December 2, 2013 5:27 PM

African - American slaves still serving after death.

Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Deep Thought
Scoop.it!

American geneticist: ‘Humans evolved after a female chimpanzee mated with a pig’

American geneticist: ‘Humans evolved after a female chimpanzee mated with a pig’ | Cultural History | Scoop.it

The human species began as the hybrid offspring of a male pig and a female chimpanzee, a leading geneticist has suggested. The startling claim has been made by Eugene McCarthy, of the University of Georgia, who is also one of the worlds leading authorities on hybridisation in animals. He points out that while humans have many features in common with chimps, we also have a large number of distinguishing characteristics not found in any other primates.


Via Sharon Bakar
Deanna Dahlsad's insight:

More of this at Eugene McCarthy's site here http://www.macroevolution.net/human-origins.html and responses to the theory here http://phys.org/news/2013-07-human-hybrids-closer-theory-evidence.html

more...
Sharon Bakar's curator insight, December 2, 2013 6:43 AM

Fascinating idea, and it seems McCarthy has data to back up what he's saying.  But how on earth would this happen?

Scooped by Deanna Dahlsad
Scoop.it!

New and cheaper method to screen ancient bones for DNA

New and cheaper method to screen ancient bones for DNA | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Hege Ingjerd Hollund proposes a combination of three screening methods:


  • microscope examination
  • inspection with ultraviolet light
  • infra-red spectrometry (a form of chemical analysis)


No single way of checking old bones produces an adequate result,” she explains. “I believe combining different approaches will give the best outcome.”


This solution is proposed in the thesis she has had accepted by the Free University of Amsterdam, which makes her one of the few Norwegians with a PhD in conservation of ancient remains.


These methods are not only fast and simple to do, but they also preserve the piece cut or drilled from the bone,” she says. “This can therefore be reused in other analyses.”

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Content Curation World
Scoop.it!

What Is the Importance of Digital Curation from an Academic Viewpoint

What is digital curation and why is it important to you? Leading experts in the curation and preservation of digital objects (such as databases, photos, vide...

Via Robin Good
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, May 25, 2013 9:58 AM

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/04/25/learn-every-day-a-bit-with-curation/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Curation

 

Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com's curator insight, May 26, 2013 1:06 AM

Digital Curation - Making the information accessible to different types of developers to continue the sharing of past knowledge with future generations. 

Pippa Yeoman's curator insight, June 6, 2013 7:04 PM

Digital curation - the preservation and repurposing of content. Using digital hubs to collect, collate and make a contribution to conversations in your area of academic interest.

Curated by Deanna Dahlsad
An opinionated woman obsessed with objects, entertained by ephemera, intrigued by researching, fascinated by culture & addicted to writing. The wind says my name; doesn't put an @ in front of it, so maybe you don't notice. http://www.kitsch-slapped.com
Other Topics
A Marketing Mix
Adventures in advertising and marketing - the contemporary, the historical, and the hysterical. http://deanna.dahlsad.com/
Antiques & Vintage Collectibles
Collecting old things; heirlooms and new to you things! Companion to http://www.inherited-values.com/
Colorful Prism Of Racism
Racism past and present. Companion to http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/category/colorful-prism-of-racism/
Consumption Junction
Consumerism meets marketing; who & what manipulates the free market of goods & services. See also: http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/category/ze-big-mouth-promotions-stuff/
Crimes Against Humanity
From lone gunmen on hills to mass movements. Depressing as hell, really.
Cultural History
The roots of culture; history and pre-history.
Dare To Be A Feminist
I do. http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/category/hey-sister-can-you-spare-some-social-change/
For Art's Sake-1
Art, crafts, and the people who make them. To inspire and purchase. Companion to http://www.ululating-undulating-ungulate.com/
Herstory
History as this woman sees it. The serious, the kitsch, the opinionated. Companion to http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/
In The Name Of God
Mainly acts done in the name of religion, but also discussions of atheism, faith, & spirituality.
Kinsanity
Let's just say I have reasons to learn more about mental health, special needs children, psychology, and the like.
Kitsch
Mostly vintage and retro "badness" but you can decide how delicious it is. http://www.kitschy-kitschy-coo.com/blog/
Nerdy Needs
The stuff of nerdy, geeky, dreams.
Readin', 'Ritin', and (Publishing) 'Rithmetic
The meaning behind the math of the bottom line in publishing and the media. For writers, publishers, and bloggers (which are a combination of the two).
Sex Positive
Sexuality as a human right.
Vintage Living Today For A Future Tomorrow
It's as easy to romanticize the past as it is to demonize it; instead, let's learn from it. More than living simply, more than living 'green', thrifty grandmas knew the importance of the 'economics' in Home Economics. The history of home ec, lessons in thrift, practical tips and ideas from the past focused on sustainability for families and out planet. Companion to http://www.thingsyourgrandmotherknew.com/
Visiting The Past
Travel based on grande ideas, locations, and persons of the past.
Walking On Sunshine
Stuff that makes me smile.
You Call It Obsession & Obscure; I Call It Research & Important
Links to (many of) my columns and articles.