Cultural History
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Cultural History
The roots of culture; history and pre-history.
Curated by Deanna Dahlsad
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Fighting for the Right to Fight Symposium

Fighting for the Right to Fight Symposium | Cultural History | Scoop.it
In the years leading up to World War II, racial segregation and discrimination were constant factors in the daily lives of many in the United States. This Thursday, April 21, we will explore the path towards equal rights from before and after World War II with special guests. Join wherever you are via #livestream to watch the Fighting for the Right to Fight Symposium.
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The Racist Truth Of The War On Drugs: Legalize It All, by Dan Baum

The Racist Truth Of The War On Drugs: Legalize It All, by Dan Baum | Cultural History | Scoop.it
At the time, I was writing a book about the politics of drug prohibition. I started to ask Ehrlichman a series of earnest, wonky questions that he impatiently waved away. “You want to know what this was really all about?” he asked with the bluntness of a man who, after public disgrace and a stretch in federal prison, had little left to protect. “The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”
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The lynching of Jesse Washington

The lynching of Jesse Washington | Cultural History | Scoop.it

The lynching of Jesse Washington.

Washington was beaten with shovels and bricks,was castrated, and his ears were cut off. A tree supported the iron chain that lifted him above the fire. Jesse attempted to climb up the skillet hot chain. For this, the men cut off his fingers.

Jesse was 15.

1916.

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, March 13, 2016 7:01 PM

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When You Kill Ten Million Africans You Aren't Called 'Hitler'

When You Kill Ten Million Africans You Aren't Called 'Hitler' | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Most people haven’t heard of him.

But you should have. When you see his face or hear his name you should get as sick in your stomach as when you read about Mussolini or Hitler or see one of their pictures. You see, he killed over 10 million people in the Congo.


His name is King...

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These 19 Photos Of Black Activism Through The Years Will Stun You

These 19 Photos Of Black Activism Through The Years Will Stun You | Cultural History | Scoop.it
As history shows, racial injustice in America and the fight to resolve it has been a long, rigorous battle -- and it is one still being fought today.

Generations of activists have been fueled by the fight against the systemic and social inequalit...

Via Darcy Delaproser, Jocelyn Stoller
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The Anti-Lynching Pamphlets of Ida B. Wells, 1892-1920

The Anti-Lynching Pamphlets of Ida B. Wells, 1892-1920 | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Pamphlets written by Ida B. Wells-Barnett on the subject of lynching comprise a substantial body of innovative writing, reporting, and analysis in U.S. intellectual history. In the 1890s especially, nascent professional social scientists, media opinion shapers, and leaders in the black community acknowledged and relied on her work.1 Indeed, Ida B. Wells-Barnett's foundational insights into the complex social dynamics behind the lynching for rape scenario have stood the test of time in the more than one hundred years since she penned them; yet her status and recognition as a social critic in the ensuing years has been embattled, to say the least.2 At her death in 1931, for example, W.E.B. Du Bois wrote in National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's (NAACP) journal, The Crisis, that her work had been "easily forgotten" and "taken to greater success" by others.3 Wells-Barnett herself complained in a diary of the neglect of "my anti-lynching contribution" in early black history textbooks penned by the influential scholar Carter G. Woodson.4 This essay suggests that rather than comprising a "forgotten" body work, Ida B. Wells-Barnett's pamphlet writings were appropriated and transformed by peers and colleagues in social reform. In turn, they marginalized her as author and leader.

Deanna Dahlsad's insight:

In honor of Ida's birthday. For books by & about Ida B. Wells-Barnett, go here.

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, July 16, 2014 10:00 PM

In honor of Ida's birthday. For books by & about Ida B. Wells-Barnett, go here.

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An Astonishing Catalog of the Violence Committed Against “Freedom Summer” Participants in a Single Mississippi Town

An Astonishing Catalog of the Violence Committed Against “Freedom Summer” Participants in a Single Mississippi Town | Cultural History | Scoop.it
This “Incident Summary” details acts of harassment, big and small, reported by civil rights activists and allies working in McComb, Miss. in the summer of 1964.
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50 Years *sigh*

50 Years *sigh* | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Today, June 21st, is my birthday; I turn 50. I feel pretty much the same way I did when I wrote this two years ago, "A lifetime of so little progress is just too much."; only more so. *sigh* I was ...
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The reality of being a black woman: A response to Ernest Baker

The reality of being a black woman: A response to Ernest Baker | Cultural History | Scoop.it

“I’m pretty sure if you get in your Delorean and go back to the point where any colonized people first encountered the white man, the thought was not “That’s fucking attractive!” It was more like “What is that yellow haired thing with the demon eyes?!”

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Statement made by Osama Nakata, 5/31/1944 (Statements of United States Citizens of Japanese Ancestry)

Statement made by Osama Nakata, 5/31/1944 (Statements of United States Citizens of Japanese Ancestry) | Cultural History | Scoop.it
todaysdocument: “ “ “I am willing to preserve the principles of democracy and freedom” Statement made by Osama Nakata, 5/31/1944; Statements of United States Citizens of Japanese Ancestry, Records of...
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Did you know that George Washington Carver, the master scientist, was physically castrated at a very young ag by his White plantation owners?

Did you know that George Washington Carver, the master scientist, was physically castrated at a very young ag by his White plantation owners? | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Back male slaves that were assigned to work in their master’s house were often castrated. 

Although it was the white slave owner that were raping their black slaves (males, females and children ) they —with an absurd degree of hypocrisy —believed that black males were sexual deviant that could not control their sexual urges.


The slave owners therefor believe that such castration of innocent Black boys was necessary to protect their daughters and...

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A Report from Occupied Territory

A Report from Occupied Territory | Cultural History | Scoop.it
 Negroes have always held, the lowest jobs, the most menial jobs, which are now being destroyed by automation. No remote provision has yet been made to absorb this labor surplus. Furthermore, the Negro's education, North and South, remains, almost totally, a segregated education. And, the police treat the Negro like a dog.
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Published in July of 1966; on police brutality in New York and the race riots of 1964.

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, May 13, 2014 4:33 PM

Published in July of 1966; on police brutality in New York and the race riots of 1964.

Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, May 13, 2014 4:33 PM

Published in July of 1966; on police brutality in New York and the race riots of 1964.

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The Best Map Ever Made of America's Racial Segregation

The Best Map Ever Made of America's Racial Segregation | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all.

 

White: blue dots; African American: green dots; Asian: red; Latino: orange; all others: brown

Last year, a pair of researchers from Duke University published a report with a bold title: “The End of the Segregated Century.” U.S. cities, the authors concluded, were less segregated in 2012 than they had been at any point since 1910. But less segregated does not necessarily mean integrated–something this incredible map makes clear in vivd color.

The map, created by Dustin Cable at University of Virginia’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, is stunningly comprehensive. Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, it shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That’s 308,745,538 dots in all–around 7 GB of visual data. It isn’t the first map to show the country’s ethnic distribution, nor is it the first to show every single citizen, but it is the first to do both, making it the most comprehensive map of race in America ever created.


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller, Jukka Melaranta
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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:41 PM

We can use maps to think spatially,make connections, and find patterns. Maps can also be used as a way to compare change over time, as in this particular case where maps from the present were compared with maps from over fifty years ago when racial segregation was plainly obvious. Now, however, when we compare past maps with those of the present, the change over time factor becomes clearly evident, revealing why maps are so useful in determining continuities or changes.

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Gender, Race, and Rape During the Civil War

Gender, Race, and Rape During the Civil War | Cultural History | Scoop.it
Slavery, the value of chastity, and laws that favored men all made it difficult for women to find justice during the chaos of war.

Via Community Village Sites
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The First Black Player in the Major Leagues Lived His Life as a White Man

The First Black Player in the Major Leagues Lived His Life as a White Man | Cultural History | Scoop.it

On June 22, 1937, Joe Louis knocked out James Braddock with a right to the jaw to become the world heavyweight champion. At a time when Major League Baseball was still a decade from integration, Louis’ victory in Chicago’s Comiskey Park was a triumph for black America, and for racial progress. “What my father did was enable white America to think of him as an American, not as a black,” Joe Louis Jr. told ESPN in 1999. “By winning, he became white America’s first black hero.”

Three months before the fight, another notable moment involving race and sports occurred in the same city: the death of a 76-year-old man named William Edward White, of blood poisoning after a slip on an icy sidewalk and a broken arm. Fifty-eight years earlier, White played a single game for the Providence Grays of baseball’s National League to become, as best as can be determined, the first African-American player in big-league history. Unlike Louis’ knockout, though, White’s death merited no coverage in the local or national press. A clue as to why can be found in cursive handwriting in box No. 4 on White’s death certificate, which is labeled COLOR OR RACE. The box reads: “White.” 


Via Seth Dixon, Jukka Melaranta
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 5, 2014 1:20 PM

Race is a socially constructed concept more than it is a genetic reality.  In 1860, William White was born to a biracial slave, with the paternity coming from the white slave owner.  According to the times, he was officially considered black but he could racially pass in white society.  So is he a pioneer for African-Americans if he was "racially passing?"  The cultural nuances of those like William White is a fascinating portal into how we think about race and identity. 

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Powerful Photographs Of Segregated America Discovered After Decades In A Box

Powerful Photographs Of Segregated America Discovered After Decades In A Box | Cultural History | Scoop.it
The prolific African American photographer Gordon Parks carved a special place for himself within Civil Rights Photography; rather than focusing his documentary lens on riotous and violent scenes, he shot color images of African American families...
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10 examples of #AAPI’s rich history of resistance

10 examples of #AAPI’s rich history of resistance | Cultural History | Scoop.it


"In the wake of the #AsianPrivilege response hash-tag to #NotYourAsianSidekick and #BlackPowerYellowPeril, it appears as if (among other misguided ideas) there is a prevailing notion out there that, in contrast to other minorities, Asian Americans “lack a history of resistance” (or that we think we do), and that this invisibility and dearth of civil rights history actually confers upon the Asian American community a form of racial privilege.


..."



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Native Intelligence | Thanksgiving History | Smithsonian Magazine

Native Intelligence | Thanksgiving History | Smithsonian Magazine | Cultural History | Scoop.it
The Indians who first feasted with the English colonists were far more sophisticated than you were taught in school. But that wasn't enough to save them


...Europeans had been visiting New England for at least a century. Shorter than the Natives, oddly dressed and often unbearably dirty, the pallid foreigners had peculiar blue eyes that peeped out of bristly, animal-like hair that encased their faces. They were irritatingly garrulous, prone to fits of chicanery and often surprisingly incompetent at what seemed to Indians like basic tasks.

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The Racism Filter (Or, Reading Between Race Lines by Skimming Lines)

The Racism Filter (Or, Reading Between Race Lines by Skimming Lines) | Cultural History | Scoop.it

You need to keep scrolling, reading; because if you don’t, your lack of attention is as bad as the lack of context. And then “Well done Tumblr. You posted a picture without context and made two of the nicest people look like complete monsters.” becomes “Well done lazy reader. You now think two of the nicest people look like complete monsters.”

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, October 15, 2013 3:41 PM

What can happen when you are a sloppy writer/publisher, when you are a lazy reader.

Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, October 15, 2013 3:42 PM

What can happen when you are a sloppy writer/publisher, when you are a lazy reader.

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Was Hitler evil?

Was Hitler evil? | Cultural History | Scoop.it

"Was Hitler evil?

 

Most White Americans will say yes: he killed 6 million Jews in the Holocaust! But to avoid any double standard we should apply the same moral reasoning White Americans apply to their own history."


Via Community Village Sites, Deanna Dahlsad
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Community Village Sites's curator insight, August 18, 2013 5:42 AM

I don't think the word 'evil' is helpful because that is a religious term.  

 

Would we say that someone born as a psychopath is evil? I suppose if one is religious they would say that.  

 

Psychopaths lack the neurophysiological “hardwiring” that enables them to care about people's feelings. 

 

Psychopathy affects approximately 1 percent of the United States general population and 20 percent to 30 percent of the male and female U.S. prison population. 


The danger in every community and nation is that it only takes one psychopath to get into a position of power (or get their hands on a gun) to end up doing massive harm. 


Click through to read Abagond's post - then we can ask ourselves if U.S. culture is evil or psychotic. 

Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, August 19, 2013 12:01 AM

We just had a similar talk at home with the kids while watching "Who Do You Think You Are?" (The episode with Chelsea Handler serching her German & Jewish family background.)

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Remains found of Underground Railroad conductor's house

Remains found of Underground Railroad conductor's house | Cultural History | Scoop.it

Exploratory excavations at the home site of Abraham Lincoln's neighbor and Underground Railroad conductor Jameson Jenkins have uncovered a corner pier of Jenkins' house.


...Jameson Jenkins was one of 168 African-Americans recorded as living in Springfield at the time of the 1850 Census.


...On Jan. 17, 1850, he was involved in an incident that was described in newspapers as a "slave stampede." He is believed to have helped a group of runaway slaves from St. Louis escape the hands of slave catchers by taking them north to Bloomington.

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Back in the 1960s, when fashion shoots featuring black models were rare...

Back in the 1960s, when fashion shoots featuring black models were rare... | Cultural History | Scoop.it

"Ghanaian photographer James Barnor bucked the trend with his fashion shoots for Drum magazine, an influential anti-apartheid magazine based in Johannesburg, and Africa’s first black lifestyle magazine."

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, February 21, 2013 1:18 AM

More photos, links, and info - worthy of the click.

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in tumblr's LGBTQ spotlight since 2010 • pflagmom: This is the story of a man that was...

pflagmom:






This is the story of a man that was part of the civil rights movement and was also gay. This is another reason that gays talk about the civil rights movement themselves.
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Jacob Leon's curator insight, February 27, 2013 2:35 PM

Issues of civil rights are not just a "race" issue we are all here together.

 

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I live in a white city. Racism is alive by the...

I live in a white city. Racism is alive by the... | Cultural History | Scoop.it
I live in a white city. Racism is alive by the people. There’s also a month for women’s history and Latino. Unfollow me. PLEASE.
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Curated by Deanna Dahlsad
An opinionated woman obsessed with objects, entertained by ephemera, intrigued by researching, fascinated by culture & addicted to writing. The wind says my name; doesn't put an @ in front of it, so maybe you don't notice. http://www.kitsch-slapped.com
Other Topics
A Marketing Mix
Adventures in advertising and marketing - the contemporary, the historical, and the hysterical. http://deanna.dahlsad.com/
Antiques & Vintage Collectibles
Collecting old things; heirlooms and new to you things! Companion to http://www.inherited-values.com/
Colorful Prism Of Racism
Racism past and present. Companion to http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/category/colorful-prism-of-racism/
Consumption Junction
Consumerism meets marketing; who & what manipulates the free market of goods & services. See also: http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/category/ze-big-mouth-promotions-stuff/
Crimes Against Humanity
From lone gunmen on hills to mass movements. Depressing as hell, really.
Cultural History
The roots of culture; history and pre-history.
Dare To Be A Feminist
I do. http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/category/hey-sister-can-you-spare-some-social-change/
For Art's Sake-1
Art, crafts, and the people who make them. To inspire and purchase. Companion to http://www.ululating-undulating-ungulate.com/
Herstory
History as this woman sees it. The serious, the kitsch, the opinionated. Companion to http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/
In The Name Of God
Mainly acts done in the name of religion, but also discussions of atheism, faith, & spirituality.
Kinsanity
Let's just say I have reasons to learn more about mental health, special needs children, psychology, and the like.
Kitsch
Mostly vintage and retro "badness" but you can decide how delicious it is. http://www.kitschy-kitschy-coo.com/blog/
Nerdy Needs
The stuff of nerdy, geeky, dreams.
Readin', 'Ritin', and (Publishing) 'Rithmetic
The meaning behind the math of the bottom line in publishing and the media. For writers, publishers, and bloggers (which are a combination of the two).
Sex Positive
Sexuality as a human right.
Vintage Living Today For A Future Tomorrow
It's as easy to romanticize the past as it is to demonize it; instead, let's learn from it. More than living simply, more than living 'green', thrifty grandmas knew the importance of the 'economics' in Home Economics. The history of home ec, lessons in thrift, practical tips and ideas from the past focused on sustainability for families and out planet. Companion to http://www.thingsyourgrandmotherknew.com/
Visiting The Past
Travel based on grande ideas, locations, and persons of the past.
Walking On Sunshine
Stuff that makes me smile.
You Call It Obsession & Obscure; I Call It Research & Important
Links to (many of) my columns and articles.