Cultural Geography
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Cultural Geography
Historical, Cultural and Social Issues of place and space
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Preserving Arapesh: UVA Linguist’s Tie With Villager Enlightens Students

Preserving Arapesh: UVA Linguist’s Tie With Villager Enlightens Students | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Fewer than 100 people still speak Cemaun Arapesh, one of more than 800 languages spoken in Papua New Guinea. Last winter, UVA linguist Lise Dobrin invited a native speaker to Grounds to assist her efforts to preserve the language.
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My Application for the LA Times Middle East Correspondent Job

My Application for the LA Times Middle East Correspondent Job | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
The LA Times has been the butt of jokes on social media this week thanks to a poorly-worded job listing for a Middle East Correspondent.
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Yoga class cancelled at University of Ottawa over 'cultural issues'

Yoga class cancelled at University of Ottawa over 'cultural issues' | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
A yoga instructor who says her free class at the University of Ottawa was cancelled because of concerns over cultural appropriation believes the student union's issues are misplaced.
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Reebok blames 'design error' for regrettable UFC Ireland shirt

Reebok blames 'design error' for regrettable UFC Ireland shirt | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Reebok removes ‘UFC Ireland’ T-shirt that omitted Northern Ireland after widespread public backlash
Seth Dixon's insight:

Ireland the island or the political entity that is known as the Republic of Ireland?  This shirt pushed a few political and cultural buttons. 

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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, March 3, 2016 7:33 AM

Ireland the island or the political entity that is known as the Republic of Ireland?  This shirt pushed a few political and cultural buttons. 

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Will Jose Bautista bat flip mark turning point in MLB acceptance of Latino culture?

Will Jose Bautista bat flip mark turning point in MLB acceptance of Latino culture? | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Given the long odds of making it to the majors from Latino countries, players like Jose Bautista and Yoenis Cespedes should not be admonished for celebrating with joy and passion.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Are the traditionalists demanding that young players (often from other countries and cultures) "respect the game" really demanding that they culturally assimilate into MLB's culture?  I don't doubt that Bautista will face retribution in the future, but isn't that a simply a violent form of enforcing cultural norms?  MLB has allowed 'unwritten rules' to be enforced by the locker room and pitcher retaliation against the batter.  Here is to hoping that purists stop demanding cultural assimilation as MLB's population has globalized and diversified.

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The surprising geography of American left-handedness

The surprising geography of American left-handedness | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Data on the left-handed is hard to come by.
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Editorial: Bring Syrian Refugees to Michigan

Editorial: Bring Syrian Refugees to Michigan | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
President Barack Obama has signaled the United States will accept at least 10,000 more refugees from Syria during the next year. Michigan should lobby to be the destination for most, if not all of those seeking new homes.

Bringing them here makes sense. The state already has one of the largest Syrian immigrant communities in the nation. There are a number of public and private support agencies in place with expertise in dealing with Arab newcomers.

In addition, Michigan has an abundance of inexpensive, available housing particularly in Detroit and its other urban centers. Detroit, with up to 80,000 abandoned structures, would benefit from refugees willing to repair and homestead those properties.
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Why Pixar Remade Certain Scenes for Foreign Viewers in Inside Out

Why Pixar Remade Certain Scenes for Foreign Viewers in Inside Out | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
If there’s one thing that Inside Out’s main character Riley hates, it’s broccoli. Or is it? Last week Pixar tech artist David Lally pointed out on Twitter that Japanese children watching Inside Out will see Riley balk at a different green veggie: peppers. But that’s not the only change made to help the film translate better....
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Gregory Stewart's curator insight, August 29, 2015 9:51 AM

You will get an interesting perspective on the making and the marketing of this movie.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2015 9:50 AM

unit 3

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Is Racism Alive And Well In South Africa's Schools?

A viral video in South Africa apparently shows pupils of Johannesburg's Curro Roodeplaat school being separated into groups by skin color after they get off a bus. The school released a statement saying it drives pupils who take English, most of whom are black, and those who take Afrikaans, most of whom are white, in separate buses. This is not the first time it's happened, and the government is relaunching investigations.
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I Have Been Sitting on Manspreaders For the Last Month and I Have Never Felt More Free

I Have Been Sitting on Manspreaders For the Last Month and I Have Never Felt More Free | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
How I snapped and started taking up as much space as I deserve.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Public space has historically been masculinized and women often are marginalized in spaces, but also in terms of how much space they culturally feel they are are allowed to occupy.  Here is a humorous account one woman who is demanding her space.  


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Catacombs make a comeback as Jerusalem seeks room for the dead

Catacombs make a comeback as Jerusalem seeks room for the dead | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
In a city rapidly running out of cemetery space, Jews are looking to a 2,000-year-old solution.


For Jews seeking eternal rest, the most coveted real estate on Earth lies in the soil of Jerusalem. Unfortunately, the city is rapidly running out of room to bury the dead. And so it has come to pass that an Israeli burial organization has teamed with a cutting-edge construction firm to bore deep under a mountain here to create a vast underground necropolis — with ­elevators. The first phase of the new subterranean city of the dead will include 22,000 crypts, arranged floor to ceiling in three tiers, in a network of intersecting tunnels now being dug through the rocky clay soil beneath Jerusalem’s largest cemetery.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 9:40 AM

unit 3

Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:36 PM

Summary: As Jerusalem runs out of space along the outskirts of the city, they must find more places to bury there dead as it is a religious tradition for Christians and Jews to be buried, so urban planning must be adjusted for catacombs in order to bury the dead.

 

Insight: This article is relevant to units 3 and 7 because it shows how religious traits can effect a city plan or model.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:32 AM

Religion- bury dead

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From Ferguson to Baltimore: The Fruits of Government-Sponsored Segregation

From Ferguson to Baltimore: The Fruits of Government-Sponsored Segregation | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

In Baltimore in 1910, a black Yale law school graduate purchased a home in a previously all-white neighborhood. The Baltimore city government reacted by adopting a residential segregation ordinance, restricting African Americans to designated blocks. Explaining the policy, Baltimore’s mayor proclaimed, “Blacks should be quarantined in isolated slums in order to reduce the incidence of civil disturbance, to prevent the spread of communicable disease into the nearby White neighborhoods, and to protect property values among the White majority.”

Thus began a century of federal, state, and local policies to quarantine Baltimore’s black population in isolated slums—policies that continue to the present day, as federal housing subsidy policies still disproportionately direct low-income black families to segregated neighborhoods and away from middle class suburbs.

Whenever young black men riot in response to police brutality or murder, as they have done in Baltimore this week, we’re tempted to think we can address the problem by improving police quality—training officers not to use excessive force, implementing community policing, encouraging police to be more sensitive, prohibiting racial profiling, and so on. These are all good, necessary, and important things to do. But such proposals ignore the obvious reality that the protests are not really (or primarily) about policing.

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The Chinese-Mexican Cuisine Born Of U.S. Prejudice

The Chinese-Mexican Cuisine Born Of U.S. Prejudice | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Fried yellow chilis. Baja-style fish. Not the typical Chinese restaurant fare, unless you're near the U.S.-Mexico border. The reasons go back to an 1882 law enacted to keep Chinese out of the U.S.
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Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:50 AM

Popular and Folk Culture-

This article explains how folk culture can spread into pop culture, such as Chinese cuisine near the U.S Mexican Border.

This article creates a sense of folk culture and popular culture because it shows how a Chinese cuisine was diffused into America, becoming popular cultural food, and blending with other closer cultures.

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The Failure of Multiculturalism

Multicultural policies accept that societies are diverse, yet they implicitly assume that such diversity ends at the edges of minority communities. By forcing people into ethnic and cultural boxes, they help create the very divisions they were meant to manage.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an interesting op-ed on European multiculturalism and political/cultural problems. 

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NADINE BURCHI SCORP's comment, July 26, 2016 7:36 AM
And the no - integration of immigrants in US , the genocide of Native Americans , i appreciate a comparaison with EU and US
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In the first majority-Muslim U.S. city, residents tense about its future

In the first majority-Muslim U.S. city, residents tense about its future | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
The same city has elected a majority-Muslim city council.
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A Brazilian student mapped out Rio's racial segregation at the beach. Can you say "white folks only?"

A Brazilian student mapped out Rio's racial segregation at the beach. Can you say "white folks only?" | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
In an ethnically diverse country, the extent that people live in affluent, white-only clusters goes far beyond what he ever imagined.
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Infographic: Learn Top 10 Travel Destinations in the World

Infographic: Learn Top 10 Travel Destinations in the World | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Based on Trip Advisor's annual Traveler's Choice Destinations Awards, this infographic features the top-voted sites in the world, according to millions of
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Why Do So Many Americans Think They Have Cherokee Blood?

Why Do So Many Americans Think They Have Cherokee Blood? | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
The tradition of claiming a Cherokee ancestor continues into the present. Today, more Americans claim descent from at least one Cherokee ancestor than any other Native American group. Across the United States, Americans tell and retell stories of long-lost Cherokee ancestors. These tales of family genealogies become murkier with each passing generation, but like Phelps, contemporary Americans profess their belief despite not being able to point directly to a Cherokee in their family tree.
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Madison Murphy's curator insight, April 21, 2:29 PM
The whole myth of having the ethnicity "cherokee" relates back to the classroom because ethnicity explains where you are from,beliefs, and culture. Personally, I think that this goes to show how many ethnicities there are and how long they have been around for. There are many ethnicities people consider themselves as.
Angel Peeples's curator insight, April 21, 2:35 PM
 This is related to world cultural geography by being about race which a group of people related by a common descent or heredity.  This article describes how many Americans claim to have Cherokee blood.  I have also claimed to have Cherokee blood because, ever since I was a child i have been told so.  Now that i have read this article I question it.  Am I really a decedent from a great Cherokee or is it just something we in the South tell each other for status.  I think it is stupid that people make things up for status like that.  If you really have an amazing ancestor like that you should be able to brag about that without it being the same as everyone else.
Kassie Geiger's curator insight, April 21, 2:40 PM
This article is relates to World Cultural Geography because race is a group of people descended from a common ancestor. This article is about people who believe that they have a Cherokee ancestor. This is probably because in between the 16 and the 18 centuries Europeans and the Cherokee did intermingle and often got married and had children. Many believe that they had a great grandmother that was a Indian princess but in all reality the Cherokee never had a social system with anything resembling the title princess. Therefore most people believe in a fictitious identity and are not related to the Cherokee tribe. 
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Latinos outgrew Sábado Gigante's racism and misogyny long before it ended

Latinos outgrew Sábado Gigante's racism and misogyny long before it ended | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
The 53-year-old show brought Latino Americans together like nothing else, but its ‘humor’ perpetuated outdated racial and gender divides
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Dale Talde's 'Proudly Inauthentic' Versions of McDonald's Chicken Nuggets and Apple Pie

Dale Talde's 'Proudly Inauthentic' Versions of McDonald's Chicken Nuggets and Apple Pie | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Chef Dale Talde, who just published his cookbook Asian-American, wants you to make McDonald's' chicken nuggets and apple pie at home...except way better.
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East Meets West: An Infographic Portrait by Yang Liu

East Meets West: An Infographic Portrait by Yang Liu | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

The artist and visual designer Yang Liu was born in China and lives in Germany since she was 14. By growing up in two very different places with very different traditions she was able to experience the differences between the two cultures first-hand.

Drawing from her own experience Yang Liu created minimalistic visualizations using simple symbols and shapes to convey just how different the two cultures are. The blue side represents Germany (or western culture) and the red side China (or eastern culture): the image above represents the boss's influence over other workers.

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How to make sense of Rachel Dolezal, the NAACP official accused of passing for black

Her story is mind-bending, but so is the concept of race itself.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Her individual story might not warrant the attention it is getting, but it is challenging many people's very notion of race--and that is worth discussing.  Race as a concept is part biological, but primarily a social construct that is can break down and be incredibly 'slippery.'

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Shaving Dogs Into Cubes Is A New Japanese Craze And We Can't Stop Staring

Shaving Dogs Into Cubes Is A New Japanese Craze And We Can't Stop Staring | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Dog lovers in Japan have taken grooming to a whole new level of strange by styling their dogs into perfectly trimmed and symmetrical cubes.

Japan, a country known for their love of turning everyday items and things into block form (see the 'square watermelon' for proof), are so taken by the craze that it’s proved a big hit at this Tokyo dog show.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Because culture. 

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6 Words: 'My Name Is Jamaal ... I'm White'

6 Words: 'My Name Is Jamaal ... I'm White' | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Jamaal Allan is a high school teacher in Des Moines, Iowa. People make assumptions based on his name alone, and that's taken him on a lifelong odyssey of racial encounters.
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Joy Kinley's curator insight, May 7, 2015 11:33 AM

It is interesting the assumptions we make purely based on a name.  

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 25, 2015 11:25 PM

Many people judge others just based on their name and don't even get to know them before they make assumptions about them. Allan has been treated completely differently because of his name and people are always rather surprised when they meet him because of how ethnic his name sounds. Our culture today expects certain things just based on names or how your voice sounds or what you wear.

 

This article is related to cultural patterns and processes by the effect of language and culture on our names, which cause others to judge us, sometimes wrongly or rather unfairly.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:00 PM

This is a really interesting point at how we automatically stereotype people into certain ethnicities based off their names. It shows how people put up boundaries in their mind that if something is this, then something else must be true as well.

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The Skin I’m In: I've been interrogated by police more than 50 times—all because I'm black

The Skin I’m In: I've been interrogated by police more than 50 times—all because I'm black | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Desmond Cole on what it's like to live under constant suspicion
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a long read, but VERY much worth it.  Don't think for a minute that the justice system is color-blind...wishing that it were so doesn't change what is.    

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