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Illegal Immigration

Illegal Immigration | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

Illegal immigration is always a very touchy political topic that is all about cultural geography and communal identity.  This chart shows how various demographic consituencies feel about illegal immigration.  As this article insinuates, the Republican platform does not resonate with most of the voting public.   

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Cultural Geography
Historical, Cultural and Social Issues of place and space
Curated by Seth Dixon
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The racial parenting divide: What Adrian Peterson reveals about black vs. white child-rearing

The racial parenting divide: What Adrian Peterson reveals about black vs. white child-rearing | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Black parenting is often too authoritative. White parenting is often too permissive. Both need to change
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a very interesting article that notes how parenting styles are often very different, one culture to the next. This additional article looks that the statistics behind spanking: it is seen as less acceptable today, but varies significantly by religion, region, party affiliation and race.  

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The Pornography of Jihadism

The Pornography of Jihadism | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Like gonzo porn, ISIS’s beheading videos are way out there. But the new element isn’t violence. The new element is degradation. Walter Laqueur, the esteemed historian and luminary of terrorism studies, writes of the 'barbarization of terrorism,' where the enemy 'not only has to be destroyed, he (or she) also has to suffer torment.' ISIS represents the apotheosis of this development, completing the degradation of the enemy by filming the whole process. But the group’s propaganda also signifies a new phase in how terrorist acts are communicated and disseminated to the wider world. Forty years ago, the international terrorism expert Brian M. Jenkins remarked that 'terrorism is theater.' What Jenkins could not have envisaged at the time was the speed and ease with which images of terror can now be produced and distributed. Nor could he have imagined just how prevalent and grotesquely pornographic terrorist theater has become, and how radically gonzo the groups are who stage it."

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The 2,128 Native American Mascots People Aren't Talking About

The 2,128 Native American Mascots People Aren't Talking About | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Even if the Redskins became the Red Skins or the Red Flyers or the Red Snyders, there would still be thousands of other teams that reference Native American imagery. Whatever happens with the Redskins, there will still be the Estelline Redmen, Chief Illiniwek, and the West Texas Comanches, each upholding the questionable legacy of Native American sports names."


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For Yazidis, Exile From Spiritual Homeland in Iraq Dilutes Ancient Culture

For Yazidis, Exile From Spiritual Homeland in Iraq Dilutes Ancient Culture | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Some are contemplating migration, severing ties to their holy land. Others want to stay and protect their shrines.


The Yazidis were propelled into the international spotlight last month, when tens of thousands fled on foot, climbing into the imposing but largely barren Sinjar Mountain range to escape IS militants besieging them at its base. It's clear from talking with displaced Yazidis that entire villages have been emptied of their inhabitants.  The Yazidis' esoteric faith is intricately tied to their land, which is why their displacement and the prospect of mass migration cuts deeper even than the pain of losing one's home.

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Losing religion at college? New study flips the common wisdom

Losing religion at college? New study flips the common wisdom | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"A college degree used to mean people were more likely to lose religion. Now, some people are losing religion whether they went to college or not but it’s especially true for those who didn’t go to college."

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Why Isn’t “Arkansas” Pronounced Like “Kansas”?

Why Isn’t “Arkansas” Pronounced Like “Kansas”? | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Kansas and Arkansas aren't so far from each other on the map, but their names seem to want nothing to do with each other. Though they share all but two letters in common, Kansas comes out as "KANzis" and Arkansas as "ARkansaw." Why so different?
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New Zealand's Wild Haka

ESPN Video: In the USA-New Zealand FIBA matchup, the USA players are very confused by New Zealand's pregame Haka.

Via Mr. David Burton
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've enjoyed the Haka, a ritualized war dance that the New Zealand teams often perform just before a match (and can't we argue that sports a form of ritualized warfare?).  The clash of cultural contexts is  of New Zealand and Team USA is what makes this video work for me. 

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Jews expelled from Guatemala village

Jews expelled from Guatemala village | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Lev Tahor community "forced out" after villagers say they felt intimidated by the group's lack of contact with locals.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Cultural differences can be subtle or jarring.  This case is one that the differences in the community was so great that there were two parallel communities coexisting in the same space.  More than anything, the overtness of their religious orthodoxy were markers of otherness, that didn't lead to assimilation and interaction, but fueled their distinctiveness and isolation.  The Guatemalan village, in essence, didn't feel comfortable with their 'otherness' and demanded that they leave.  The Lev Tahor are considered far more conservative than most ultra orthodox groups and their customs have clashed with Canadian and Guatemalan officials as well as most of the Jewish world. Does the state have the the right or even duty to investigate what is occurring in 'closed' communities?  When should a group's religious liberties considered secondary?      

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What’s in a Name? Ole Miss Wants to Stop Using Its Nickname.

"To most University of Mississippi students and alumni, calling the institution 'Ole Miss' is just natural. It’s what people say. University email addresses are @olemiss.edu, not @umiss.edu. But not everyone likes the name. The University’s announcement on Friday that, as part of a review of race relations at the university, it would encourage 'appropriate' use of the term won praise from some quarters but plenty of criticism. So did a series of other announcements by the university, which is hoping to change its association with symbols of the Confederacy."

Seth Dixon's insight:

When referring to heritage and cultural traditions and icons of our cultural landscapes, it is good to reflect on these questions, "Who's heritage is being represented?" 

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The Ferguson Syllabus

The Ferguson Syllabus | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Sociologists for Justice have compiled a compelling and engaging list of readings that inform the socio-historical context of the events in Ferguson, MO.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Some schools have banned the discussion of Ferguson from the classroom; ironically this same school claims to "prepare our children to live and work in an ever-changing global society."   This set of readings is more than just some op-eds about Ferguson (there are a million), but academic readings that explore the issues that were just under the surface during these protests. 

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For Parents Of Young Black Men With Autism, Extra Fear About Police

For Parents Of Young Black Men With Autism, Extra Fear About Police | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
People with autism often have trouble communicating with police, which can be dangerous — and scary for parents who also worry about racial profiling. Now, some cities are trying to mitigate the risk.


Lorraine Spencer has been watching the news from Ferguson, Mo., where an unarmed black 18-year-old was shot and killed by police, and worrying about her own son's safety. Jermaine is 16 years old and bi-racial, with a dark complexion. He also has autism and wants to be more independent, especially as he nears adulthood.

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Russia Wants Bulgarians to Stop Vandalizing Soviet Monuments

Russia Wants Bulgarians to Stop Vandalizing Soviet Monuments | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Russia is demanding that Bulgaria try harder to prevent vandalism of Soviet monuments, after yet another monument to Soviet troops in Sofia was spray-painted.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Generally speaking, if you don't want icons of your culture desecrated by other people, you shouldn't export them to other places through imperialistic practices.  Personally, I love what they've done with this monument.

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Amnesty International sends team within US for first time

Amnesty International sends team within US for first time | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
As anger erupted again on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, a human rights team from Amnesty International worked on the ground in the US for the first time ever.
Seth Dixon's insight:

After Michael Brown was shot 6 times by a police officer, the community was outraged and the police responded by maintaining their concept of control by exceeding their powers.  There will be much more fallout from this before it is all said and done. 

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Cory Erlandson's curator insight, August 19, 8:31 AM

This might challenge the notion that humans rights are solely an American export.

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Where police forces don't resemble the community

Where police forces don't resemble the community | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
A Washington Post analysis of police staffing shows that the vast majority of cities have a police presence that is a lot whiter than the population.
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Cory Erlandson's curator insight, August 19, 8:32 AM

While my students are not quite ready for this level of complexity on Day 1, this will be a nice data analysis warm-up next quarter. 

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Palestinians share tear gas advice with Ferguson protesters

Palestinians share tear gas advice with Ferguson protesters | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
As authorities crack down on protests, Palestinians stand with teargassed Missouri residents.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Fascinating social media and cultural interactions.

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Unrest in Ferguson, Mo., After Police Shooting

Unrest in Ferguson, Mo., After Police Shooting | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was shot and killed Saturday by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo. The Times examines the demographics of the town and its police force, as well as crime rates.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This primer about the Ferguson, Mo. situation.  As this map shows, it is a predominantly African-American community with an overwhelming Caucasian police force.  

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Global Parenting Habits That Haven't Caught On In The U.S.

Global Parenting Habits That Haven't Caught On In The U.S. | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

If there's one thing have in common with those , it's that they both show us just how varied parenting styles can be.

Argentine parents let their kids stay up until all hours; Japanese parents let 7-year-olds ride the subway by themselves; and Danish parents leave their kids sleeping in a stroller on the curb while they go inside to shop or eat.

Some might make American parents cringe, but others sure could use a close study. Vietnamese mothers, for instance, get their kids out of diapers by 9 months.

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This Chart Explains Every Culture In The World

This Chart Explains Every Culture In The World | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
As countries become more developed, they travel diagonally to the upper-right.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Despite the headline, this does not explain every culture in the world.  It does put cultures within a comparative matrix to notice broad patterns.  This is rarely done in cultural geography mainly because we believe that the headline is unachievable and reduces to many of the variable that create distinct societies.  This is interesting, but take it with a grain of salt and don't try to infer too much from the data. 

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 3:49 PM

APHG-U3

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 8:12 PM

This is possibly the worst chart in the world!

(a) you can't cluster cultures like this, you lose what matters: Geertz's thick (vs thin) description;

(b) the idea that Protestant Europe or English Speaking cultures value "self expression" vs "survival values" has never been inside a corporate workspace where many people spend many of their lives, or surveyed the incomes of artists in these countries.


(c) Secularity and rationality are also traditions, going back hundreds or even thousands of years.

(d) The idea that as cultures develop, the move towards Protestant Europe is the silliest, most blatantly ethnocentric statement I've seen in a long time.

Let's hope that people are not being trained using this BS.  

Jane Haggis's curator insight, August 17, 11:43 PM

silly

 

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Afghan Brides Dress To Impress, Fueling An Unlikely Business Boom

Afghan Brides Dress To Impress, Fueling An Unlikely Business Boom | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
In one of the world's poorest countries, where many women still wear head-to-toe burqas, lavish spending and competition among brides is fueling a boom in shops selling pricey and glamorous dresses.


Afghans live in one of the world's poorest countries — but you wouldn't know that from their lavish wedding ceremonies. Families sell possessions and borrow money . This wedding culture is part of the reason there's been a boom in women's dress shops in my neighborhood in Kabul, the Afghan capital.


It's still one of the most jarring contradictions in Afghanistan: watching women wearing headscarves, or full, head-to-toe blue burkas, walking down the street past store windows full of glamorous, low-cut gowns.

Seth Dixon's insight:

The merging of traditional and popular cultures makes for some of the more jarring and unexpected portions of the cultural mosaic.  Globalization is creating more unanticipated juxtapositions.  


Tags: Afghanistan, culture, folk cultures, culture, development, poverty, gender.

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In Richmond, students seek to revive ‘Rebel’ mascot

In Richmond, students seek to revive ‘Rebel’ mascot | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Students and alumni from a Richmond-area high school are seeking to revive the school’s historic mascot, a Confederate soldier known as the “Rebel Man,” spurring debate about the appropriateness of public school connections to the Civil War and its...
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Pope Francis: Central American Kids Crossing US Border Should Be ‘Welcomed and Protected’

Pope Francis: Central American Kids Crossing US Border Should Be ‘Welcomed and Protected’ | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
In a Monday letter to a Mexico City Vatican conference, Pope Francis wrote that the tens of thousands of Central American children illegally crossing into the United States should be “welcomed and protected.”
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Video: How do you pronounce ‘water?’

Video: How do you pronounce ‘water?’ | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
YouTube users across the United States have uploaded dozens of videos to demonstrate their local dialects. PostTV examined people’s accents and state-specific answers to an online list of common questions.
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 7:42 AM

unit 3, this is one of my favorite topics in class!

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Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn

Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
During summer, the sun never sets in Sweden's northernmost town, posing challenges for Muslims observing the holy month.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Like many early religious traditions, Ramadan is observed based on measurements from the moon and sun. The start of Ramadan is determined by the sighting of the new moon, which  moves about 11 days back in the Gregorian calendar each year. During Ramadan the consumption of food and water is prohibited between dawn and dusk, how do Muslims observing the fast manage in the far north of Scandinavia, where the sun never sets?  When Ramadan falls in December, however, Muslims will face the opposite of midnight sun: polar night. For two weeks, the sun does not rise above the horizon.

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The Geographic Legacy of Seinfeld

The Geographic Legacy of Seinfeld | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
25 years after the show's premiere, New York City is dotted with monuments to Jewish humor.
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Cultural Identity

Cultural Identity | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

Two women from different parts of the world, showing allegiance with a gun, flag and holy book http://pic.twitter.com/NgjUOhcEOz 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This juxtapostion is fascinating...

How are they the same? How are they different?  How does your own cultural identity impact how you judge these two images? 

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Curated by Seth Dixon
I'm a geography professor at Rhode Island College. I tweet @APHumanGeog I welcome suggestions & appreciate meaningful collaboration. http://geographyeducation.org