Cultural Geography
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Cultural Geography
Historical, Cultural and Social Issues of place and space
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Historypin

This is a video introduction to www.historypin.com which might just prove to be a very useful and important project.  It's historical geography powered by collaborative mapping that is infused with social media dynamics.  Backed by Google, they are geo-tagging old photos to recreate the historical geographies of all places and comparing them with current street view images.  You can search by topic, place or date...this has the potential to be very big.   

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4995songs's comment, November 16, 2011 4:13 PM
Absolutely brilliant! The possibilities that this offers are staggering. If museums, galleries, and archives all got on board with this, they could create an incredible database that would allow teachers to add so much more depth to their lessons. I feel like having a visual timeline paired with geographic references in this capacity would give students (and everyone else!) a stronger understanding of how deeply history and geography are connected.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 16, 2011 6:40 PM
Agreed, this is conceptually amazing...but what a vast undertaking. I'm half-tempted to upload some pictures but I know that I've got too many pet projects at the moment and think that this one has the potential to overwhelm me time-wise.
GIS student's comment, November 17, 2011 3:37 PM
Awesome site! As an aspiring teacher, this website can be great for then and now projects. When explaining different eras or time periods this not only shows where certain things took place, but what they looked like as well. Definitely something that will become more popular in the social media aspect of society. Definitely a site I can spend hours on.
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ORBIS-Historical Geography of Transportation

ORBIS-Historical Geography of Transportation | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

This is a tremendous resources for understanding the historical geography of the Ancient Roman Empire and the transportation network.  Using ORBIS you can simulate travel logistics in the pre-modern era.  The differences between the fastest, cheapest and shortest routes between any two given locations can be very telling about the geographic factors impacting transportation.   

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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     

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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

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Stories Displayed on Maps

Stories Displayed on Maps | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
On myHistro you can create advanced geolocated timelines that you can play as presentations. Pin your events, videos and photos to the map and share them with friends and family.

 

This new resource, myHistro, combines interactive maps with timelines to organize stories, journeys or historical events as the move over time and place.  By embedding photos, videos and links this creates an incredibly dynamic platform for telling historical and geographic stories.  By combining these features, this is a powerful tool to create customized resources for you students.  Pictured above is a sample timeline that shows the spatial and temporal journey of the Olympic torch for the 2012 Games.   

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Soda vs. Pop with Twitter

Soda vs. Pop with Twitter | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
One of the great things about Twitter is that it’s a global conversation anyone can join anytime. Eavesdropping on the world, what what!

 

While many educators have been using http://popvssoda.com/ to show the linguistic regions in the United States, this is a similar map, with the added social media component.  To map out these regions, the cartographer used the word choice on geo-tagged tweets as the data source.  For another twitter, map, the following link shows which regions are most actively engaged on Twitter: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/06/top-countries-on-twitter_n_1653915.html

What do these regions show us?  What types of regions are these?

 

Seth: This is a fun site! 

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Chris W's comment, August 27, 2012 11:02 AM
This is a really cool use of twitter! I use the term soda, which most of the northeast uses as well.
Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:35 PM
Twitter is something that is becoming widely used, and is something I usually check everyday. I never really thought of twitter beyond advertising and communicating. It is amazing the kind of data that can be extracted from peoples tweets. In the soda vs. pop argument I would say soda which makes sense since the data shows that people in the Northeast refer to it as soda. Twitter is so current that you can actually get some current and accurate data just from reading the hash tags in peoples tweets. It's amazing that such information can be extracted from all around the world.
Curated by Seth Dixon
I'm a geography professor at Rhode Island College. I tweet @APHumanGeog I welcome suggestions & appreciate meaningful collaboration. http://geographyeducation.org