Cultural Geography in the Middle East and South Asia
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Rice Mill, Bangladesh

Rice Mill, Bangladesh | Cultural Geography in the Middle East and South Asia | Scoop.it
This Month in Photo of the Day: Your Shots
A rice mill worker rests in Bangladesh.
What Makes This a Photo of the Day?
The careful framing of the worker, his tools, and the rice creates a scene that is almost iconic in its simplicity.

Via Thomas Faltin
Haya Ahmad's insight:

This photo of the day is extremely insightful. As I've done my observations, I know that students in the metropolis rarely know anything about farm or agricultural life. To them, farms are the red barnhouse with cows, pigs and horses outside of them. This is an insightful way to show students where our food comes from, who does the work for us, and how it's made. This picture can be used for various classes besides geography, it can even range to Economics. The class can discuss the different parts of the picture, like the rice, the worker and the broom, or exactly how much rice there is. This picture can be a preview for an agricultural unit or even mill workers in South Asia.

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India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes


Via Seth Dixon
Haya Ahmad's insight:

This video may be a little corny and not educational, but it can be used for any social studies class to spark a really great conversation, not just about India and Pakistan. For history, it can be a preview to British colonization in India, the Paritition and current day conflicts. It can even stem to border problems in countries all around the world and how it can affect our lives even today.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:38 AM

This video is reminiscent of the families separated during the Korean war recently being allowed to visit one another. While tensions still exist between India and Pakistan many have begun to come to peace with the concept their nations won't be unified under either's rule. Because of this cooling of tensions families and friends are now able to see each other again after years without seeing them. Of course this is a Google commercial so the sincerity is somewhat diminished because of it's origins.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:11 PM

The most intriguing commercial that shows the differences and consequences of what happens between two nations. It shows hurt and feelings no human should have to go through. The biggest thing with this is how that after so much time apart two different people of different religions or countries can come back together and remain friends after so long of conflicting issues.

MA Sansonetti-Wood's curator insight, January 26, 9:29 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

True, this is a commercial--but what a great commercial to show that the history of of a geopolitical conflict has many casualties including friendships across lines.  This isn't the only commercial in India that is raising eyebrows.  This one from a jewelry company is proudly showing a divorced woman remarrying--something unthinkable for Indian TV one generation ago. 


Questions to Ponder: How does the Indian media reflect the values and beliefs of Indian culture?  How does the Indian media shape Indian culture?

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War in Syria: Interactive Map Outlines Major Battle Zones

War in Syria: Interactive Map Outlines Major Battle Zones | Cultural Geography in the Middle East and South Asia | Scoop.it
This interactive map explores the years-long war that has entangled Syria and is now on the international stage.

Via Kristen McDaniel
Haya Ahmad's insight:

This interactive map helps students not only learn what's going on in the world, but where it's happening. There is a stereotype that American kids are notorious for not knowing where Iraq is on the map. This map not only shows a geographic location, but has important cities that are constantly in the news for a major event of the 21st century. I would use this when teaching about current events in the Middle East.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:50 PM

Fascinating interactive map showing conflict zones in Syria.  

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Pakistan protesters block Nato route

Pakistan protesters block Nato route | Cultural Geography in the Middle East and South Asia | Scoop.it

Pakistani activists have blocked the main supply route for provisions destined for Nato troops in Afghanistan to protest against US drone strikes.


Via Leicester Worker
Haya Ahmad's insight:

This text is an important current event text that relates to geography in many ways. There are various reasons as to why it's important. It is a depiction of relations between the United States, Pakistan and an organization like NATO. I would want my students to read this to understand what is going on in the world and how our country's presence and actions affect another's, in this case, Pakistan's. The actions between these two countries impact global institutions like NATO because their supplies are blocked. I would have my students read this as a current events article for homework or maybe at the beginning of class, show this as a current events topic for the day.

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‘Jerusalem’: a dazzling tour without the conflicts

‘Jerusalem’: a dazzling tour without the conflicts | Cultural Geography in the Middle East and South Asia | Scoop.it

Movie Review [3 out of 4 stars]

‘Jerusalem,’ narrated by Benedict Cumberbatch. Written and directed by Daniel Ferguson. 45 minutes. Not rated.

 

Jerusalem,” a new and spectacular IMAX documentary, is laudable for turning armchair tourism into a breathtaking experience — a viewer can truly feel as if he or she has gone inside a number of fantastic, ancient places.

 

But there is something odd about the way the unhappiest chapters in a long history of territorial disputes are avoided in deference to loftier goals.

You’d never know that, while watching glorious footage of the Temple Mount in Jerusalem’s Old City, there are specific conflicts — particularly between Jews, Christians and Muslims.

 

Where “Jerusalem” succeeds is at answering large questions: Why is the city considered so important to several cultures and three major religions? Why are some of the most sacred sites in the world all packed within one place? Above all, for those of us who will never go there, what do they look like?

 

Narrated by Benedict Cumberbatch, “Jerusalem” looks at family life and annual sacred rituals. The filmmakers — granted rare access to certain views of the city as well as holy sites — take us to the Western Wall, the Al-Aqsa Mosque and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre (where the euphoric Ceremony of the Holy Fire becomes the film’s most dazzling scene).

 

Ultimately, “Jerusalem” is as much about an ideal future of mutual

understanding and tolerance as it is about history. Still, skirting ugly, present-day realities leaves a gap in the experience.


Via Tee Poulson
Haya Ahmad's insight:

This is a great article that talks about the movie, "Jerusalem," which is narrated by Benedict Cumberbatch. Since the class I would teach would probably talk a lot about conflicts going on in the Middle East, it is a refreshing article to read that would also preview a multi-cultural, interfaith unit. Teachers can show this movie as well to the students so they can learn about religious culture in Jerusalem, especially Christian culture which isn't spoken about very often.

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Catherine Kobasiuk's comment, September 27, 2013 9:28 AM
That description makes me want to see it even more than before.
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Israel should increase Palestinian water quotas - Al-Monitor: the Pulse of the Middle East

Israel should increase Palestinian water quotas - Al-Monitor: the Pulse of the Middle East | Cultural Geography in the Middle East and South Asia | Scoop.it
The problem of wastewater in the West Bank endangers Israel, thus the solution may lie in increasing water quotas allotted to the Palestinians.

Via Juan Carlos Hernandez
Haya Ahmad's insight:

This article deals with environmental issues as well as local conflict in the Middle-East. It's important because the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is a long-lasting issue that isn't close to being resolved, so it's always integral to look at the many problems that are surrounded around it. I would use this in class for a debate or essay about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Other teachers could use it for environmental issues and how necessary clean-water and sewage systems are.

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Juan Carlos Hernandez's curator insight, December 2, 2013 11:54 AM
Israel should increase Palestinian water quotas - Al-Monitor: the Pulse of the Middle EastSummary⎙ Print The problem of wastewater in the West Bank endangers Israel, thus the solution may lie in increasing water quotas allotted to the Palestinians.Author Danny RubinsteinPosted November 29, 2013Translator(s)Hanni ManorOriginal Article



Read more: http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/business/2013/11/israel-palestine-wastewater-west-bank-pollution-sewage.html?utm_source=&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=8651#ixzz2mKyE1cxh

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Appeal date set for Egypt female protesters

Appeal date set for Egypt female protesters | Cultural Geography in the Middle East and South Asia | Scoop.it
Lawyer says that court will hear appeal on December 7 from women protesters sentenced to 11 years in jail.
Haya Ahmad's insight:

This article can be used in a lot of different ways. Since it is regarding female protesters getting arrested for protesting the Egyptian military, it can be used in an American Government class, a Geography class and Political Science class. I would use this in an American Government class when teaching democracy and compare it to our Constitution. Other  classes like a geography class can use this as a current events topic.

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