Cultural Geography
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The Cultural Construction of Beauty

TED Talks Cameron Russell admits she won “a genetic lottery”: she's tall, pretty and an underwear model. But don't judge her by her looks.

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Nikolas M's comment, February 1, 2013 1:44 PM
ouff finaly!
Fabrizio Bartoli's curator insight, July 25, 2013 4:15 AM

Deep and interesting speech to work with...

Renuka de Silva's curator insight, August 30, 2013 2:45 PM

A new beginning for my social justice centered classroom – a great point for discussion and student engagement. Thank you.

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Race and Identity in the Dominican Republic: A Complex Topic (Hannah Loppnow) | Global Knights. Local Daze.

Race and Identity in the Dominican Republic: A Complex Topic (Hannah Loppnow) | Global Knights. Local Daze. | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

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Jenny Ebermann's curator insight, March 8, 2013 8:24 AM

Interesting!

chris tobin's comment, March 12, 2013 6:01 PM
Just goes to show the long term effects of colonialism on the people and the changes in the government. I was not aware of the Trujillo dictatorship practices or skin tone on ID cards-Thanks
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Idioms

A collection of short, sharp Idioms that will keep you guessing until the end.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 13, 2013 9:35 AM

To become truly fluent in a language, mastering idioms is often the last and greatest hurdle.  In this video is show way understanding idioms are so difficult because they are often stripped of their cultural context. 


For example, people smuggling contraband that knew their shipments were going to be searched would hide objects in large barrels of beans.  So, to reveal a secret is to 'spill the beans.'  Today, that cultural context is lost, but idioms can endure far beyond their cultural context. 

Dean Haakenson's curator insight, May 13, 2013 11:46 AM

Really fun!

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Challenging Stereotypes in 'Peter Pan'

Challenging Stereotypes in 'Peter Pan' | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Native Americans are characterized, marginalized, counted in number books (see Ten Little Rabbits by Virginia Grossman), depicted with incorrect images, and otherwise represented in hurtful, derogatory ways. Growing up in America, we are bombarded with images, toys, and stereotypes."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 21, 2013 4:37 PM

This article looks at how a Native American family worked within the system to change the school's performance of Peter Pan to be, well, less racist.  It was a product of it's time, and looking at older Disney movies from a 21st century lens can be quite eye-opening.    

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A street by any other name...

A street by any other name... | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
...might be easier to sell. By Chris Partridge.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 22, 2013 8:00 PM

As stated by the Church of Geography: "In Europe during the Middle Ages, cities were often segregated (in part) by occupation. So if you needed baked goods, you'd go to the section of the city in which all the bakers lived. Shoes? Go to the neighborhood where the cobblers lived.

And the street names reflected these occupations: Bakers Lane, Cobbler Lane, and so on. Many of these names continue to exist, reflecting those cities' Medieval pasts.  Prostitution also tended to be found in particular districts and on particular streets. Sure, Bordhawe Lane still exists in some places (Bordhawe apparently means "brothel"). Yet for some reason, the more imaginitive street names have all been replaced. "

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Lego Racism? Muslim Turks complain about Jabba the Hut

Lego Racism? Muslim Turks complain about Jabba the Hut | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Lego racism? Turks in Austria say Lego's Jabba's Palace set looks like a mosque. And Lego's Star Wars villian Jabba the Hut perpetuates racism and prejudice toward Muslims among children who play with Legos.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 27, 2013 3:30 PM

While there are certainly culturally insensitive elements in popular culture (especially movies), I think that this one is coincidence.  Star Wars has plenty of more overtly offensive caracatures (think the Trade Federation or Jar-Jar Binks), not all similarities are deliberate. 

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Sweden shaken as riots continue in immigrant suburbs

Sweden shaken as riots continue in immigrant suburbs | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Days of rioting have left Sweden searching for answers, wondering what went wrong in a nation welcoming of foreigners and proud of its tradition of tolerance and social equality.

 

It has also spurred a debate about the underlying causes, with some Swedes blaming the perpetrators for failing to integrate and other residents of these suburbs complaining they have been forgotten by mainstream society.


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Jodhpur - India's Blue City

Jodhpur - India's Blue City | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

DB: The aesthetics of architecture within a society not only reveal the communities interpretation of what is considered beautiful or pleasing in appearance but also differentiates between what is considered sacred or important. The symbolic significance of aesthetics in colors, designs and a place of residence can be indicative of socioeconomic standing is within society and what the community values.  Jodhpur, India is well known for the beautiful wave of blue houses that dominate the landscape of a rather dry region. However, it is believed that these blue houses originally were the result of ancient caste traditions. 

 

Brahmins (who were at the very top of the caste system) housed themselves in these “Brahmin Blue” homes to distinguish themselves from the members of other castes. Now that the Indian government officially prohibits the caste system, the use of the color blue has become more widespread. Yet Jodhpur is one of the only cities in India that stands steadfast to its widespread aesthetics obsession with the color blue which is making it increasingly unique, creating a new sense of communal solidarity among its residence.

 

Questions to Consider: How has color influenced the cultural geography of this area?  How are the aesthetics of this community symbolic of India’s traditional past, present and possible future?

 

Tags: South Asia, culture, housing, landscape, unit 3 culture.


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ctoler geo 152's curator insight, July 22, 2014 2:10 AM

never knew this city existed. Blue City!

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:27 PM

The blue color shows how traditional Hindu society has influenced the overall aesthetic of the area. Because the blue signified the elite class of the society, everyone took to the color and the entire city reflects its popularity. The fact that almost every building in the city is painted the same color shows how dominant the Hindu society and culture was.