Cultural Geography
17 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Human Population Through Time

It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on Earth’s resources, even as we approach 11 billion?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lilydale High School's curator insight, December 5, 4:59 PM
How Earth's population had grown.
ROCAFORT's curator insight, December 6, 2:14 AM
Human Population Through Time
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, December 6, 2:23 PM
Pour la DNL seconde
 
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Belgium and the Netherlands Swap Land, and Remain Friends

Belgium and the Netherlands Swap Land, and Remain Friends | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
The discovery of a headless corpse in the Netherlands helped Belgium and its bigger Dutch neighbor resolve a property squabble that began in 1961.

 

In a region that has long known geopolitical and linguistic squabbles, and where Belgium has lived in the shadow of its neighbor, the land swap was anything but inevitable. In 1961, when the Meuse was reconfigured to aid navigation, it had the side effect of pushing three pieces of land onto the wrong side of the river. The uninhabited area subsequently gained a reputation for lawlessness, wild parties and prostitution.

 

Tags: borders, political, territoriality, Belgium, Netherlands, unit 4 political, Europe.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna Hoppe
Scoop.it!

Why Many Young Russians See a Hero in Putin

Why Many Young Russians See a Hero in Putin | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Twenty-five years after the breakup of the Soviet Union, they crave the stability that the nationalist president represents.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna Hoppe
Scoop.it!

The Uprooted

The Uprooted | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
War, sectarian violence, and famine have forced more than 50 million people from their homes—the largest number of displaced people since World War II.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East

Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Without trying to defend or absolve U.S. policy, then, it is worth stepping back to ask what shared historical experiences might have left these four countries — Iraq, Syria, Libya and Yemen — particularly at risk of violent collapse. The following maps help highlight how, at various points over the past century, historical circumstances conspired, in an often self-reinforcing way, to bolster the stability of some states in the region while undermining that of others."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 4:31 PM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

Kelly Bellar's curator insight, October 22, 9:30 AM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Country Cluster Quiz

Country Cluster Quiz | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"No borders. No landmarks. No context. How many countries will you be able to recognize? Here’s how this works. I give you a the outline of several countries together, without borders or any other context, and you guess which countries you’re looking at."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 4:26 PM

This is not the most difficult geography quiz (as advertised on Buzzfeed), but it does take some time since all the countries in a given cluster aren't all immediately obvious.  The fact that it is multiple choice certainly simplifies the this quiz.

 

Tagsmapping, trivia, funborders.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

India’s campaign to change cultural practices

India’s campaign to change cultural practices | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Television commercials and billboards now carry a message that strike at the heart of the Indian contradiction of being the world’s fastest-growing major economy and also where relieving oneself in the open is the norm in most villages. Research shows that one of the reasons for the stubborn social practice is the centuries-old caste system, in which cleaning human waste was a job reserved only for the lowest caste. Having a toilet at home is still considered unclean by many villagers. They regard it cleaner to go to the open farms, which can cause water-borne diseases, the second leading cause of death of Indian children younger than 5."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 4:02 PM

An aggressive new campaign is ridiculing those who are no longer poor but continue to defecate in the open--even this UNICEF campaign (some language and low-brow humor, so use your own discretion) is working hard to change the cultural patterns and practices surrounding defecation and sanitation.  There are more cellphones than toilets in India and the lack of adequate sanitation and toilets is serious enough that that Prime Minister Narendra Modi has made building toilets a national priority.  Comics are using their platform to bring this issue of uneven development to light. 54% of people in India do not have regular access to toilets and these comedians are using their platform to not only get some laughs, but to advocate for social change. 

 

Tagsdevelopment, poverty, India.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Introducing ISIS

"The invasion of Iraq was supposed to turn the country into a democracy that posed no threat to the United States, or the rest of the world. Thirteen years later, Iraq has collapsed into three warring states. A third of the country is controlled by ISIS, who have also taken huge amounts of territory in Syria. VICE correspondent Ben Anderson gains exclusive access to the three front lines in Iraq, where Sunni, Shiite and Kurdish forces are fighting for their lives. Anderson visits with the Russian military forces in Syria, meets captured ISIS fighters in Kurdistan, and interviews US policymakers about how the situation in Iraq spun out of control."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 2:15 PM

Many young students are especially baffled at how a terrorist organization can seize control of large chunks of territory.  If you are looking for a good video introduction that explains how and why ISIS was able to gain power and than gain and maintain territory, this is it (it's classroom safe despite the source). 

 

Tags: Syria, war, conflict, political, geopolitics, Iraq, devolution, terrorism, ISISMiddle East.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Most Young Americans Can’t Pass a Test on Global Affairs—Can You?

Most Young Americans Can’t Pass a Test on Global Affairs—Can You? | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
A new survey finds that even college-educated Americans have a lot to learn about the world around them. Take our quizzes to see how much you know.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 16, 10:41 AM
Share your insight
Danielle Adams's curator insight, September 19, 5:17 PM
geo 152
Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 5:44 PM

Are you smarter than a well educated young American? Take the quiz to see. 

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Turkey's 'bumpy ride' into the EU?

Turkey's 'bumpy ride' into the EU? | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"As the UK prepares for what looks like a slow and painful divorce from the European Union, the people of Turkey are wondering how their relationship with Europe will now develop.

The government in Ankara has been seeking to strengthen its case to join the EU, but as Europe grapples with Brexit - is the Turkey's membership closer or further away?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 31, 4:48 PM

This video show some of the recent shifts in the always important, often rocky Turkey/EU relationship.   Economically, Turkey has consistently sought greater ties with Europe for the past few decades and Europe keeps Turkey at arms length.    Turkey has applied to join the EU, but that is not going to happen without some massive social restructuring that would take years. 

 

Tags: EuropeTurkey, supranationalism, economicrefugees, political, video.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

It's a Matter of Perspective

"There's a flip side to everything," the saying goes, and in 2 minutes, Derek Sivers shows this is true in a few ways you might not expect.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 7, 8:12 PM
In this ultra-short TED talk, Derek Sivers show that what is considered true is often dependent on your perspective, the context, and how it is situated within a particular paradigm.  This is a mind-blowing video because it exposed our framework (which might go unquestioned as universal) to be but one of many ways in which to organize the world and the information within it.  His first example is the Japanese address system (I prefer to show this version of the same material since the visuals are better).  I also enjoy showing this clip together to hammer home the point that our perspective shapes our view of reality.  
 
Tags: Japan, perspective, TED. 
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Map Men: teaching geography through comedy

Map Men: teaching geography through comedy | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Mark Cooper-Jones and Jay Foreman, the Map Men, tap into a rich vein of geographical quirks to teach through comedy

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Catherine Smyth's curator insight, August 28, 8:11 PM

Feeling lost teaching geography? Navigate your way through the new concepts, skills and content in the new Australian Curriculum and K-6 syllabus by developing geographical understanding.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, August 29, 12:43 PM
Holy heck these guys are good! I'd like to see more of these Map Men videos. I'm sure at least some of my 8th graders can appreciate some British wit.
Christopher L. Story's curator insight, August 29, 9:24 PM
Anything to help people know where the Caspian sea resides...or was that Uzbekistan?
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing)

The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing) | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Asia's rapid urbanisation is changing the very shape and nature of what we think of as a city.  It's not just the rapid increase in their numbers or their sheer size that makes these megacities fascinating. They look, feel and behave differently, too."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 2:29 PM

The term megacity (a city with a population greater than 10 million) has been around for a while and there wasn't much linguistic need to describe something bigger.  Today, most megacities are more like Lagos and Mumbai, places of extreme wealth asymmetries than the global cities of New York City and London.  Some are now using the term metacity to describe cities with populations of 20 million.  Asian metacities are a good place to start thinking about the largest urban regions that are increasingly dominating economic, political and cultural affairs.      

 

Tags: urbanmegacitiesEast Asia.

Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 8:48 PM

Mega city to Meta city...

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How to Create an Interactive Map with Visme

How to Create an Interactive Map with Visme | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
A step-by-step tutorial on how to create an interactive map with Visme, a free online infographic and presentation tool.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 2, 10:49 AM

If you have students use Piktochart to create infographics, then this is a new tool that you should consider.  In addition to creating infographics, this allows users to create and embed interactive maps in those infographics.  This is a both a baby-step into the world of GIS as well as a way to create student projects that are richly informative.

  

TagsAPHG, infographic, visualization, mapping, GIS, edtech.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 21, 8:11 AM

Looking for some Thanksgiving resources?  Here you go. 

 

Tags: Thanksgiving, food, seasonal.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, November 21, 8:33 AM
Regional divide in selection of meals for Thanksgiving?
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Data USA

Data USA | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
The most comprehensive visualization of U.S. public data. Data USA provides an open, easy-to-use platform that turns data into knowledge.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lilydale High School's curator insight, November 5, 6:23 PM
Data about many aspects of places, industry, education in the US.
ROCAFORT's curator insight, November 18, 3:05 AM
Data USA
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

U.S. Students Are Really Bad at Geography

U.S. Students Are Really Bad at Geography | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Your kid has no idea where Saudi Arabia – or maybe even South Carolina – is. Here's why.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 22, 2:40 PM

The U.S. government report on 8th grade geography is not a 'pick-me-up' but a sobering reminder of the task that lays before us.  This article quotes a few alliance coordinators on the current situation and how to change it. 

 

TagseducationK12geography education.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East

Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Without trying to defend or absolve U.S. policy, then, it is worth stepping back to ask what shared historical experiences might have left these four countries — Iraq, Syria, Libya and Yemen — particularly at risk of violent collapse. The following maps help highlight how, at various points over the past century, historical circumstances conspired, in an often self-reinforcing way, to bolster the stability of some states in the region while undermining that of others."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 4:31 PM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

Kelly Bellar's curator insight, October 22, 9:30 AM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The history of African-American social dance

Why do we dance? African-American social dances started as a way for enslaved Africans to keep cultural traditions alive and retain a sense of inner freedom. They remain an affirmation of identity and independence. In this electric demonstration, packed with live performances, choreographer, educator and TED Fellow Camille A. Brown explores what happens when communities let loose and express themselves by dancing together.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 5, 4:18 PM

Dance is more than just a way to have fun; dance reflects cultural forms of expression and communal identity.  This Ted-Ed talk demonstrates the rich cultural heritage that can be seen in particular cultural traits (such as food, clothing, dance, music, etc.).  This is bound to be a fun, vibrant way to show the how cultural patterns and processes play out using something that young people generally enjoy. 

 

Tags: culturediffusion, popular culture, music, race, historicalthe South, TED, video.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, October 9, 7:07 AM
Didn't include the forced dancing on the slave ship. The corn shucking dances. Forced dancing on the plantation.
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

'Leftover Women' in China

"Chinese women face immense pressure to get married before they turn 27. In many Chinese cities, so called marriage markets are a common sight, where parents go to post and match personal ads. A number of brave Chinese women have finally stood up to speak their mind against society’s labels and their parents' pressures."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 20, 2:07 PM

This emotional ad about 'leftover women' in China has received a lot of traffic and is now invigorating a national conversation about marriage customs, gendered norms, and cultural expectations.  What isn't as explicit in the video is how demographic policies and cultural preferences for boys has created the situation that puts added pressure on single women

 

Questions to Ponder: How is this (at least partially) a lingering impact of the One Child Policy?  What traits of traditional Chinese culture led to this current situation?   

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, culture, population.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

DON'T PANIC — Hans Rosling showing the facts about population


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 15, 3:49 PM

Over the years I've shared many video clips featuring Hans Rosling and the Gapminder resources (click here for archived links).  For many this is going to but a rehash of previous videos, but this in the 1-hour long version of global population data (2016 Population Reference Bureau).  Clearly he is a proponent of lowering fertility rates--here he paints the optimistic view that population growth growth and development can be balanced in a future that is more ecologically and economically sustainable.  

 

Tagspopulation, statistics, media, models, demographic transition modeldevelopment.

Kelly Bellar's curator insight, September 22, 6:54 PM

Over the years I've shared many video clips featuring Hans Rosling and the Gapminder resources (click here for archived links).  For many this is going to but a rehash of previous videos, but this in the 1-hour long version of global population data (2016 Population Reference Bureau).  Clearly he is a proponent of lowering fertility rates--here he paints the optimistic view that population growth growth and development can be balanced in a future that is more ecologically and economically sustainable.  

 

Tagspopulation, statistics, media, models, demographic transition modeldevelopment.

Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why China and India face a marriage crisis

"What has lead to this marriage squeeze?  First, millions women have gone 'missing'. A generation ago, a preference for sons and the greater availability of prenatal screening meant first Chinese couples, then Indian ones, started aborting female fetuses and only giving birth to boys. At its extreme, in parts of Asia, more than 120 boys were being born for every 100 girls. Now, the generation with distorted sex ratios at birth is reaching marriageable age. The result is that single men far outnumber women."

 

Tags: gender, China, India, culture, population.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Dustin Fowler's curator insight, September 17, 7:23 PM
Great food for thought!
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

Absurd propaganda postcards warning men about the dangers of women’s rights, early 1900s

Absurd propaganda postcards warning men about the dangers of women’s rights, early 1900s | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Here’s a collection of totally ridiculous vintage postcards and posters dated from around 1900 to 1914 warning men of the dangers associated with the suffragette movement and of allowing women to think for themselves. I think my favorite is the postcard where the woman is pinching the man’s ear and forcing him to clean the home. The nerve of her to request such a thing!"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring

Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Facing a low fertility rate (1.4), Italy is holding its first 'Fertility Day' on Sept. 22, which will emphasize 'the beauty of motherhood and fatherhood' and host roundtable discussions on fertility and reproductive health. That may seem inoffensive, but the country’s health department is trying to raise awareness with an ad campaign that’s striking many as misguided and, worse, sexist and alarmist."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 2, 8:47 AM

This pro-natalist campaign designed by the health ministry has received near universal criticism (in an attempt to see other perspectives, I searched for a more positive or even neutral article on the topic and came up empty-handed).  Italy's Prime Minister openly scoffed at the premise of the campaign, and many pundits argue that it shames and pressures women into thinking about personal choices of childbearing as if they were communal responsibilities.  Unlike the infamous 'Do it For Denmark' advertisements that were filled with playful innuendos, or Singapore's 'Maybe Baby' which highlights the joys of parenthood, this one has more overtones of duty and plays on fear more than those other pro-natalist campaigns.      

 

Tags:  ItalyEurope, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 5, 7:28 AM
Preliminary - population
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Fertility Rates-Differences Within Countries

"An important aspect about country level data of fertility to keep in mind is that there can be considerable heterogeneity within countries, which are hidden in the mean fertility which were discussed in this entry. The mean Total Fertility Rate for India in 2010 was 2.8 (UN Data): But this average hides the fact that the fertility in many Southern Indian regions was below 1.5 (which is similar to the mean fertility in many European countries), while the fertility in Northern India was still higher than 5 children per woman (which is as high as the mean of the African countries with the highest fertility)."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 23, 2:05 PM

This is a stunning example of uneven development and regional differences within countries.  Too often we discuss countries as if the situation inside the borders of one country is the same throughout it, even if the geographic contexts can be wildly different. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why are the fertility rates in so different in northern and southern India?  How does this regional imbalance impact the country?  What are other examples of major differences within a country? 

 

Tags: regions, population, demographic transition model, declining populationmodelsunit 2 population, India, South Asia.