Cultural Characteristics of Families for HSIE Stage 1 Students
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Twelve Canoes

12 Canoes is a broadband website presenting, in an artistic, cultural and educational context, the stories, art and environment of the Yolngu people who live around the Arafura swamp in north-eastern Arnhem Land.
Harrison Jewson's insight:

Twelve Canoes offers an Aboriginal perspective on family, culture and even ways of life. Specifically they talk about how everyone is related, so their father's brothers are the same closeness as their father, similarly for their grandfathers and mothers etc. In this capacity the notion of family is different to many "western" Australian families, which may consist of only their immediate family. In this Aboriginal culture, everyone looks after everyone else as if they were family, there is a much bigger community focus than the western system which is typically immediate family, or even simply ego centric. The content of the website is simple enough to be accessible to advanced children in the stage 1 syllabus, however may be too difficult for the lower stage 1 children to understand. More importantly I would suggest that the teacher watches this video, makes a summary or information into a worksheet, and allow the children to take their time since the content is quite difficult. 

The benefit of this website is it does provide a video to go with the narration which makes it much easier to follow than a block of text and will appeal to more hands on learners. In the section of the website that has a video on kinship they refer to who their fathers, brothers, sisters, mothers are etc. Which again could be the source of a brief activity for the children, simply in having them write down who lives with them in the household and how that compares to the Aboriginal story, or to the other children in the class. This will give an understanding, like many of the other resources, that not all families are the same just these differences are not incorrect or wrong, they simply are present which will hopefully lead to more multiculturally aware children as they develop to the later stages of learning

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Who are the families of the world | Global Education

Who are the families of the world | Global Education | Cultural Characteristics of Families for HSIE Stage 1 Students | Scoop.it
Harrison Jewson's insight:

Global Education's website is designed to provide global perspectives across all levels of the curriculum in teaching resources including educational videos and exercises. This particular page deals specifically with the “families of the world”, which suggests activities that involve the student writing about their own family such as whether they live with just their immediate family, or also their grandparents and uncles/aunties. Then once this has been done moving on to look at different family compositions across the world through the use of picture books and questions designed to best test understanding of the content within the books.

 

This website is very useful since it is specifically designed for teachers, it provides well structured and thought out lesson plans to cover the diverse and difficult content of offering global perspectives to stage one children who can be quite egocentric. However the best way the content will be learnt is if the students can be engaged with it, and also if the teacher is engaged and actively supporting the learning of the children while they do these activities. The questions provided do well to test not only the understanding, but also the capacity of the students to engage in the learning by creating new work, about the families they read about in the stories, and also evaluating how these families are different or similar to their own.

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Raising cross-cultural kids: Different families have different rules

Raising cross-cultural kids: Different families have different rules | Cultural Characteristics of Families for HSIE Stage 1 Students | Scoop.it

Whether in an apartment with kids from a dozen countries, or in the United States in one of the least diverse school districts around, we have made it our intention to raise cross-culturally aware kids.  This month we’ll be posting weekly tips on how to foster cross-cultural and interracial sensitivity in your kids–and your self.

 


Via Charles Tiayon
Harrison Jewson's insight:

This website offers accessible content, designed for adults, that shows easy ways to introduce children to the fact that some families are not the same as their own. It summarises each concept fairly simply, such as "different families have different rules" which focuses on rules that a parent might set within a household. This draws attention to the fact that not all parents have the same rules within the household, or even out of the house.

 

 

A small classroom activity you might try to exemplify this fact would be to have some of the children write down rules they have at home, such as how much tv they can watch, what their bedtime is etc. Then having them compare with each other to see what rules are the same and what rules are different. We might expect that we would have universal rules such as no hitting etc, but the more interesting ones that as teachers, we should draw attention to are the other, possibly culturally specific rules. Not to mention rules that stem from other differences between families, for example if one child doesn’t have a television at home they are unlikely to have rules about how often they can watch it, or the same might apply to a computer and playing games. Of course with modern families this will not necessarily be because they can’t afford these luxuries but maybe they don’t want them which would be another example of a difference in how cultures embrace technology.

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World Vision Australia

World Vision Australia | Cultural Characteristics of Families for HSIE Stage 1 Students | Scoop.it
Harrison Jewson's insight:

This is just a really interesting video linked from the Global Education site that shows "a day in the life of Lucy" which is a common theme surrounding the pedagogy of teaching differences and similarities between families on an international scale. Since it shows how different her "daily routine" is to the vast majority of students in Australian Schools

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SWIRK interactive learning

Harrison Jewson's insight:

The SWIRK website offers interactive games and information aimed at teaching children HSIE outcomes. As such it is an excellent resource for teachers in classrooms of stage 1 students, as they students themselves can navigate the website, find information and deliver it to the teacher.  Particularly this website has a section on families past and present, but also on the different ways in which families in different cultures celebrate different occasions. Specifically it provides some examples of how we celebrate birthdays compared to how children in Russia conventionally celebrate birthdays, or how we celebrate the New Year compared with children in China.

 

As mentioned this website provides easy ways not only to teach the children the content but also to teach research and online navigation abilities. One could easily create a worksheet with information that the students had to find by looking at the website, this would encourage not only independent working to find information, but also at a higher level question the information given by analyzing the answers. Such as “how do you celebrate birthdays”, or “does everyone celebrate them the same way?” etc.

 

This way of finding information will hopefully make it more accessible to the students, since they are doing it themselves, and allow greater personalization when the questions are involved thereby creating stronger links between the student and the content they are studying.

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The Classroom Bookshelf: Mirror

The Classroom Bookshelf: Mirror | Cultural Characteristics of Families for HSIE Stage 1 Students | Scoop.it
Harrison Jewson's insight:

“Mirror” by Jeanie Baker is a picture book that illustrates the simultaneous story of the day in the life of a child in Australia and a child in Morocco. The book itself draws obvious comparisons between the two cultures and families by compared to very different globally located perspectives. As Jeannie herself describes in the introduction the book aims to highlight how, due to geographic location, some aspects of family life will be very different and foreign, yet at the same time some aspects are very similar.

 

The website itself has useful examples of exercises a teacher could do with children in a classroom setting. For stage 1 children it suggests having the students create their own picture books titled “a day in the life” and having compare with each other what they did on the weekend or on some other day etc. Then they can use this storybook to compare what was the same, and what was different between the different children to encourage them to learn more about particular practices or customs their family might undertake that others don’t.

This last step is probably the most important for really getting the point across about different cultures within different families, since as Blooms taxonomy suggests, it is the synthesis and then evaluation of content within a subject that requires the greatest understanding and knowledge of the subject area.

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