Education and Cultural Change
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Education and Cultural Change
How our culture is co-evolving with the algorithmic medium and the education is following this process
Curated by Pierre Levy
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We need to say yes to academic self-publishing but senior academics must lead the way

We need to say yes to academic self-publishing but senior academics must lead the way | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
Getting to grips with self-publishing might be time consuming at first but Elizabeth Eva Leach shows that welcome engagement and expert editorial input can be gained from going it alone without pub...
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Elsevier Has Bought Mendeley For $100M To Expand Its Open, Social Education Data Efforts | TechCrunch

Elsevier Has Bought Mendeley For $100M To Expand Its Open, Social Education Data Efforts | TechCrunch | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
Educational publisher Elsevier is diving further into the world of open and social educational data: it has bought Mendeley, the London/New York-based provider of a platform for academics and organizations to share research and collaborate with...
Pierre Levy's insight:

Henning says Mendeley will continue to source data from different places — not just focus on what’s published or owned by Elsevier. “If people want to source the latest research on neurobiology, it wouldn’t make sense to limit this,” said Henning. “Elsevier will help us by enriching our content, but when it comes to other publishers it will also increase the transit routes into them.”

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Filipe MS Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2013 5:53 PM

"Today we are excited to announce that Mendeley is joining Elsevier!"
for $100M?

For a suppose partnership is quite a considerable amount; I’m open to make some new friends, as always, special they  are willing to pay me $100M :)

 

To the ones that find this figure reasonably high (like I did initially), here’s a “heads up”: Elsevier, more than “just” acquiring Mendeley software, it’s “acquiring” Mendeley COMMUNITY (and the value we’ve been adding all this time).

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How Scholars Hack the World of Academic Publishing Now

How Scholars Hack the World of Academic Publishing Now | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
You can form a cartel. Or you can ignore it all together.

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If you want to understand the modern academy, it wouldn’t hurt to start at “impact factor.”

Every year, the company Thomson Reuters assigns every academic journal an “impact factor.” Impact factors measure, roughly, how often papers published in one journal are cited by other journals. It is an ecological measurement, in other words. You’d recognize the names of journals with the highest impact factors — Nature, Science, etc. — but the world of scholarly journals is enormous, and there’s crowding at the bottom.

Two stories today illustrate the problems with impact factors, and the difficulty of measuring knowledge through any metric.

First, Nature News revealed that a Brazilian citation cartel had been outed by Thomson Reuters. That’s right: a citation cartel.

The Brazilian government measures graduate schools based on the impact factor of the journals that those schools’ students publish in. Brazilian journals, many of which are newer, have low impact factors, so Brazilian graduate students often publish in journals abroad. This makes them and their graduate program look better, but it means the commercial benefit of Brazilian scholarship flows, in part, to non-Brazilian companies.

So editors at a set of Brazilian journals began linking to each others’ journals... a lot. The flurry of cross-citation made every journal appear more influential, and succeeded in raising the journals’ impact factor in 2011. For a moment, the scheme worked.

Until it didn’t.


Via Wildcat2030, Xaos
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Karen Pearlman's comment, September 7, 2013 11:23 PM
The implication here is that applying economic rationalization to research culture seems to lead directly to a) corruption; b)meaningless research activity; c) strife filled worlds for academic researchers whereby value is measured against criteria external to the research concerns; and d) probably lower standards of teaching since this research outputs have more "value" for academic's careers.
Christos Nikolaou's comment, September 8, 2013 4:10 AM
sounds unfortunately true...
Pedro Tavares's curator insight, September 13, 2013 8:59 AM

no coments ....

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Is the definition of Open Access closed? leaders debate language strategy | Tim McCormick

Is the definition of Open Access closed? leaders debate language strategy | Tim McCormick | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
Pierre Levy's insight:

This is a “storify” or gathering of an extended conversation on Twitter, referencing the issue and article above, between  Tim Mc Cormick and a number of leading advocates of and commentators on  publishing.

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noraUCV's curator insight, April 3, 2013 11:02 PM

un nuevo elemento en nuestro lenguaje