Cultural and Natural Treasures
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Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park | Parks Australia

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park | Parks Australia | Cultural and Natural Treasures | Scoop.it
See Uluru-Kata Tjuta through Anangu eyes, learn from our land and from us, the oldest living culture on earth. Uluru is so much more than a rock. It's a living place.
Laura Kneller's insight:

 

Australia offers some of the most amazing natural phenomenons in the world. Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park is  renown for its natural wonders and cultural significance. UNESCO describes it as both a cultural and natural heritage site (UESCO., 2014). Thus, the national park, formerly known as Uluru National Park, is a great case study because in order to recognise its importance as a heritage site, the cultural traditions of aboriginal people need to be explored. This makes for a deep leaning experience in a whole range of subject areas.

 

The government website is a rich resource into the environment, aboriginal beliefs and modern history of the park. Through quality pictures, videos and information the parks landscapes, seasons, plants and animals are explored as well as, aboriginal stories, rock art and bush foods. Links to information on the first European to see Uluru, the joint management project, when it became world heritage site and information on its touristic aspects are also provided.

 

There are  many different technological features on the site including maps, apps and audio tours. The audio tours in particular would be useful in combining a listening task and giving a different sensory experience to a lesson. An art task could also link in nicely with this topic, the colours and forms of the Australian landscapes and aboriginal paintings would be very aesthetically appropriate to create artistic works.

 

UESCO (2014). Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. Retrieved April 13, 2014 from  http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/447

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World Heritage

World Heritage | Cultural and Natural Treasures | Scoop.it
The Great Barrier Reef has been at the centre of a big fight recently. The argument revolves around whether some development work there might lead to damage of the natural World Heritage site. Tash found out what being a 'World Heritage Listed' site means and where both sides stand.
Laura Kneller's insight:

 

Behind the News is a great resource particularly for stage 3, it presents current local and global news in a format that is appropriated for children.  Information is presented in an unbiased journalistic format which allows students to assess for themselves and engage with what’s going on in their world today in a critical way.

 

This particular news story opens with what being a world heritage listed site means; it explains that an international body recognises different cultural and natural sites for their mystery, beauty, meaning and history. Australia has 19 heritage listed sites and as a country we have promised not to do anything to damage them. The broadcast then goes on to present an interesting environmental and economic conundrum.

 

Coal ports which bring in new jobs of the locals and money to the state are planning on being built near the reef. The water in this area is too shallow for the large ships to enter the port so the site has to be made deeper, this means dredging sand from the bottom of the ocean and dumping it in the Great Barrier Reef marine park. Some say companies will have to abide by strict regulations as to when and where the dumps will take place and therefore not cause damage. While others are worried nevertheless that it is too hard to control and the sand will be washed up onto the reef. This is a fantastic topic to stage a class debate presenting arguments for and against the coal ports.

 

The Great Barrier Reef as a heritage site could also be explored within a unit on Australian marine life which lends itself nicely for excursions to marine parks, aquariums, coastal walks and beaches. Teachers could also focus on aboriginal practises and connections to Australia’s sea and coastlines.

 

Thiele. N. (2014, March 11) World Heritage. Behind the News. Episode 6. [Television broadcast]. ABC Network

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Mapping World Heritage

Mapping World Heritage | Cultural and Natural Treasures | Scoop.it
Students learn about UNESCO World Heritage sites and use pictures and clues to identify the locations of the sites on a large map. They use geographic coordinates to refine the locations of the sites and consider how geographic coordinates are part of a helpful system of location.
Laura Kneller's insight:

 

The National Geographic is a reputable source of information; the education section of the site includes ideas for activities and can be used on its own for practical materials. The slides on the site provide pictures of professional quality and give an overview of the UNESCO world heritage sites. The information outlines where different sites are located by region and shows an assortment of architectural, cultural and natural sites. I would use the National Geographic resource for a lesson introducing the topic of world heritage. The objective of the lesson would be to outline the topic and explore different case studies which we will then further develop throughout the unit.

 

A great idea for a group activity would be to make a puzzle out of pictures from the different heritage sites, hand out the pieces and then ask children to find those with the same picture.  The pictures will include questions on the back. The students could then use their research skills to answer the questions. Activities may also combine geography outcomes, when the groups have answered the questions they could place their picture cards on a class map using latitude and longitude.

 

Louise Swanson, teacher at Sydney High School has a blog for HSIE teaching; she combines literacy in her lesson on world heritage sites. She puts unedited information on the back of the cards and has the students identify spelling and grammatical errors.  For further information on her lesson visit her blog

 

http://www.hsieteachers.com/1/post/2013/08/world-heritage-sites-and-literacy.html

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Cultural Heritage Contemplations: World Heritage status for Bagan?

Cultural Heritage Contemplations: World Heritage status for Bagan? | Cultural and Natural Treasures | Scoop.it
Laura Kneller's insight:

 

This is a fantastic blog post which really opened my eyes to all the different aspects of world heritage. As a teacher I need to constantly be challenging myself to understand my own beliefs and opinions especially on a topic I am teaching.

 

I am very interested in Myanmar having travelled their recently and I am personally fascinated by the ‘Bagan’ debate. UNESCO has not recognised the more than 2000 temples of Bagan as a world heritage site (Jones. F., 2012). There are arguments on both sites of the spectrum as to whether they should do so. In terms of outstanding universal value the temples at Began exceed this definition, they are truly a wonder. However, when considering their authenticity some historians say Began is not an original authentic site as so much re-building and repair has gone on that does not resemble the historic architecture.

 

Here is a helpful news broadcast giving more information about the opposing arguments.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrYd75pcCvQ

 

I would definitely try to use Bagan in a case study in the classroom as it provides debate but also allows the students to look into the reasons we have world heritage, the process that has to be under gone when considering a new site and the specific criteria UNESCO has to determine new sites. Myanmar is a current global news topic as it is opening up economically, tourism could be made into a huge industry so the listing Bagan as a heritage site would be desirable for the country. Combining the wider picture of Myanmar‘s history, culture and environment would be beneficial for students when considering Began as a heritage site.

 

Schearf. D. (2013, March 8) Burma's 'Angkor Wat' Seeks World Heritage Status. [Television broadcast]. Voice of America Network

 

Jones, F. (2012, February, ) Myanmar, All  Mine. Travel.  The Wall Street Journal, http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052970204880404577229263646972998 Retrived April 4, 2014

 

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Teach Through Educational Travel: Abu Simbel, Egypt | WorldStrides International Discovery

Teach Through Educational Travel: Abu Simbel, Egypt | WorldStrides International Discovery | Cultural and Natural Treasures | Scoop.it
Laura Kneller's insight:

 

The Educated Traveller Blog includes insight to a range of different travel destinations worldwide. There are a number of world heritage sites that Julia visits and provides information on. She also includes activities for lessons, offers links to other resources and adds her personal experiences in language relevant for stage 3.

 

The case study that I find particularly interesting is on Abu Simbel in Egypt’s South. It is a multifaceted topic as it touches on ancient and modern history, while also includes environmental factors.

 

Teachers could combine Abu Simbel as a heritage site in a history unit on ancient Egypt, learning about the tradition, customs and beliefs systems of the ancient civilisation. Students could also learn about the original discovery and dig out of the temples in the late 19th century. Perhaps this could lead to a lesson in archaeology, discovery and conditions for preservation.

 

Teachers could also look into the restoration as its own case study. In 1968 the Nile was dammed and temples were moved to an artificially created hill 200 meters higher than the original site (Zeid. M. A., 1989). Students could learn not only importance of the site as world heritage but explore environmental factors effecting important sites, technological and practical factors in conducting a project of this size and ways in which governments and the UNESCO responded.

 

The National Geographic channel has a short informative video on the moving Abu Simbel

 

 http://natgeotv.com.au/videos/egypt/moving-abu-simbel-D67E82C0.aspx

 

 

Zeid. M. A., 1989, A Case Study, The Environment Impacts of the Aswan High Dam pp 147 - 157

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