Cultura de massa no Século XXI (Mass Culture in the XXI Century)
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Cultura de massa no Século XXI (Mass Culture in the XXI Century)
Um olhar sobre os fenômenos culturais do século XXI
(A look at the cultural phenomena of the XXI Century)
Curated by Rogério Rocha
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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Cultura de massa no Século XXI (Mass Culture in the XXI Century) | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

Via Seth Dixon
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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:57 PM
This is a pretty informative interactive map of the largest ports in the world. Very well put together to help some understandings of trade. Most of the ports are on the East coast of China which is the Pacific Sea. The reason there are probably so many here in China is because they make a large amount of product that needs to be shipped worldwide. They are like the leading country in imports and exports to other global or major global markets.
Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:40 PM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  


New Jersey at 24

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:22 AM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

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Digital Globes, a New Way to View the World

Digital Globes, a New Way to View the World | Cultura de massa no Século XXI (Mass Culture in the XXI Century) | Scoop.it
Their expense has so far made them rare, but with prices coming down, these glowing, programmable spheres are set to become more common.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 10, 2013 6:24 PM

Due to the expense, only science centers and major museums can afford these digital globes that we see in futuristic movies.  However, as with all new technologies, the price will drop as it is refined and made available for larger market, even if that time is still a ways off.  If this were available in your classroom, it would be splashy, but how much added value would it bring?  What kind of lessons could you teach with this?

Tom Perran's curator insight, January 11, 2013 6:21 PM

Very exciting development in classroom technology!

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His And Hers Colors – Popular Color Names By Gender Preference

His And Hers Colors – Popular Color Names By Gender Preference | Cultura de massa no Século XXI (Mass Culture in the XXI Century) | Scoop.it

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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lauren west's comment, September 9, 2013 7:11 PM
This article was about how male and females differ in naming colors. Females tend to have a lot more names for colors than men do. It also seems as if men like to name colors gross names(ie crap, mucus, baby vomit) and women seemed to give colors much more pleasant names (dusty teal, Barbie pink, peacock blue). This data shows that men tend to generalize colors more than women. It does not really give a reason for why this happens.
lauren west's comment, September 9, 2013 7:15 PM
This article was a lot shorter that I expected it to be. I wish it had went into more detail and given a reason for why men and women differ. However, I did like the interactivness of it. Going through and reading the names of some of the colors was interesting.
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The Internet In 2020 - Infographic

The Internet In 2020 - Infographic | Cultura de massa no Século XXI (Mass Culture in the XXI Century) | Scoop.it
The Internet is progressing at such a blistering pace that by 2020, we are probably going to see a lot of changes, hopefully for the better.  For example, right now here in 2012, we’re seeing a vast amount of data being uploaded to the cloud, as more...

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What the Internet Looks Like

What the Internet Looks Like | Cultura de massa no Século XXI (Mass Culture in the XXI Century) | Scoop.it
You are looking at, more or less, a portrait of the internet over an average 24 hours in 2012—higher usage in yellows and reds; lower in greens and blues—created by an anonymous researcher for the "Internet Census 2012" project.

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Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 5:02 PM
Whoa. This is awesome. Never before had I seen internet usage across the globe before. I wasn’t too surprised by the map its showing. Obviously the United States and Europe would have the highest internet traffic of the world although I was quite surprised to see such massive internet activity in Central America, near Panama and Costa Rica. This data was collected illegally and it was interesting how they did it. It was a bot who hacked into Linux computers with no password (really…) or a default password (still really…) and then tracked their IPv4 address to see their activity. It was a non-threatening bot and they created a readme file on each computer that explained what it was doing however it was still an invasion of privacy and no matter how cool the map came out I cannot agree with their methods of obtaining this information. What interested me at first about this was activity in the Middle East. You can see a lot of activity in Turkey and around the Nile in Egypt, but other than that the rest of the region is fairly dim. It is unfortunate that is so because of how it could help people there, just look at the Arab Spring.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
I found this collection of data very interesting. It reveals a number of different things about the internet across the world and the intensity of its usage.
Most obviously, perhaps, you can see what areas of the world have the most internet usage, or at least access. The areas of highest use seem to certainly match up with what you would expect: high internet usage and access in first world countries in Europe and in the United States, lower internet usage and access in more impoverished areas such as Africa and the Middle East. The amount of internet usage can also be seen increasing and decreasing as the animation moves from right to left, indicating the twenty four hour cycle of a day and presumably decreased internet usage during the night and increased usage during the day. This animation provides fascinating and valuable information about the internet in a unique geographic context. Economic geography is apparent in the concentration of internet usage, while physical geography is evident in the correlation between what parts of the world are accessing the internet at higher rates and when, in contrast to other parts of the world.
Thomas D's comment, May 2, 2013 11:32 AM
I find that this article of Internet usage is very interesting and somewhat helpful in understanding the development of countries. You can see from this that over a 24 hour period of time that the entire United States is lit up with a color. When over this 24 hour period there are places on the map that never once do you see a light or you only can see it for a small period of time. I think this goes to show how greatly our society depends on the Internet nowadays. That we basically use the internet or a computer for just about everything at all times of the day. That in some countries they are so underdeveloped that they barely have access to computers. According to this picture Africa is barely lit up and it’s mostly lit up in South Africa which is one of the growing countries in the world. I think this information although gathered illegally is very interesting to look at and see who uses the internet the most.
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13 News Ways To Learn In 2013

13 News Ways To Learn In 2013 | Cultura de massa no Século XXI (Mass Culture in the XXI Century) | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 9, 2013 10:32 PM

Are you looking for ways to learn online this year? Check out this post which provides 13 possibilities for you to explore. A few of them are:

* Get inspired by great speeches - listen to speeches from turning points in history, movies and more!

* Directory of open access journals - do you need to research a topic? Check out journals that provide free access.

* Publish your own graphic novel - Use Comic Master to write a graphic novel (or perhaps, have students in your class use it).

* Explore maps - new and old. With GPS we may neglect maps, yet maps are an amazing tool. Learn about geograpgy, culture, history and more as you explore old maps (and new) at a variety of websites. 

Nine additional links await you when you click through to this post!

Pradeep Kumar's curator insight, January 9, 2013 11:24 PM

Check this out

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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | Cultura de massa no Século XXI (Mass Culture in the XXI Century) | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click the both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.