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Are we ready for post-modern farming? | Center for Investigative Reporting

Are we ready for post-modern farming? | Center for Investigative Reporting | Cultibotics | Scoop.it

“…the world is a diverse and complex place. Soils, climates and cultures vary greatly, even within small areas. And ecosystems, economies and societies behave more like living organisms than factories or machines. Everything is connected and everything interacts – a bacterium on the root of a plant with the quality of local schools with the transparency of national governments with the acidity of distant seas. In a world like that, a food production system based on optimized simplicity seems quaint at best. Rebecca says we’d do better to aim for optimized complexity. Call it post-modern agriculture.”

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Cultibotics
Cultibotics is about applying robotics to making horticultural best practices scalable and economical.
Curated by John Payne
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Applying deep learning to genomic medicine | Gizmag

Applying deep learning to genomic medicine | Gizmag | Cultibotics | Scoop.it
A startup called Deep Genomics plans to use deep learning to usher in a new era of personalized medicine by building a huge database that identifies gene variants and mutations never before observed or studied and determines how these link to various diseases.
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NexGen report on leveraging commercial rockets to return to the moon | Scribd

“This study’s primary purpose was to assess the feasibility of new approaches for achieving our national goals in space. NexGen assembled a team of former NASA executives and engineers who assessed the economic and technical viability of an 'Evolvable Lunar Architecture' (ELA) that leverages commercial capabilities and services that are existing or likely to emerge in the near-term. We evaluated an ELA concept that was designed as an incremental, low-cost and low-risk method for returning humans to the Moon in a manner that directly supports  NASA’s long-term plan to send humans to Mars. The ELA strategic objective is commercial mining of propellant from lunar poles where it will be transported to lunar orbit to be used by NASA to send humans to Mars.”

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SparkFun AVC 2015 video recap | SparkFun

The 2015 SparkFun Autonomous Vehicle Competition has come and gone, but if we have an action-packed recap for anyone wanting to relive all the glory that was...
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BBC Micro Bit computer's final design revealed | BBC News

BBC Micro Bit computer's final design revealed | BBC News | Cultibotics | Scoop.it
The BBC's forthcoming mini-computer gains features absent in an earlier prototype, but is also to be more bulky when used as a standalone device.
John Payne's insight:

This collaborative project underlines the importance of providing a complete hardware/software ecosystem, with a simple entry point, for use in education.

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The real problem isn’t AI, it is man | SlashGear

The real problem isn’t AI, it is man | SlashGear | Cultibotics | Scoop.it

“Science fiction usually narrates how man created the AI monster that would almost wipe it out of existence, but it isn't the act of creating AI itself that would send man's history on a downward spiral. It would be the use of such artificial intelligence that is the more imminent danger. Forget Skynet or the Matrix. AI in the hands of man is already enough to wipe out mankind when it comes down to it. In short, it could be the irresponsible, not to mention unethical, use of artificial intelligence that could eventually lead to a future as dark or even darker than Terminator.”

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Popup Challenge: Help revolutionize popup robotics | Wyss Institute

“Join the Wyss Institute Popup Challenge, a design contest based around the laminate design techniques outlined at popupcad.org. We hope to grow the community of people who can design, build, and operate laminate devices and micromechanisms. If you are a student considering using popups for a class project, a researcher who has an application for a new robot, or simply want to learn about the process, then consider submitting your design to the contest! For more information please visit www.popupcad.org

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FRE2015 video recap | YouTube

FRE2015 video recap | YouTube | Cultibotics | Scoop.it

This playlist is assembled from four sources, and includes preparation for the the event as well as many videos of the Field Robot Event itself.

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Audi to contribute knowhow to Google Lunar XPrize team

Audi to contribute knowhow to Google Lunar XPrize team | Cultibotics | Scoop.it
The first private lunar rover could be an Audi with the car company offering its services to one of the teams competing for the Google-sponsored Lunar XPrize in building an unmanned rover.
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First video from FRE 2015 | KaMaRo Engineering

John Payne's insight:

You can almost imagine these machines actually doing the gardening!

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Field Robot Event (FRE) 2015 takes place this week

Field Robot Event (FRE) 2015 takes place this week | Cultibotics | Scoop.it

“This is the official web site of the Field Robot Event 2015 that will be held at the University of Maribor, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences from 16.-18. June 2015.”

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Will your job be done by a machine?

Will your job be done by a machine? | Cultibotics | Scoop.it

“What job is hardest for a robot to do? Mental health and substance abuse social workers (found under community and social services). This job has a 0.3 percent chance of being automated. That's because it's ranked high in cleverness, negotiation, and helping others. The job most likely to be done by a robot? Telemarketers. No surprise; it's already happening.”

John Payne's insight:

This is the 4th in a 5-part series.  Earlier episodes are linked from the last one. http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2015/05/22/408834372/episode-626-this-is-the-end

 

This series is based upon an Oxford University study "THE FUTURE OF EMPLOYMENT: HOW SUSCEPTIBLE ARE JOBS TO COMPUTERISATION?" http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/downloads/academic/The_Future_of_Employment.pdf

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Google's A.I. is training itself to count calories in food photos | Zero Moment

Google's A.I. is training itself to count calories in food photos | Zero Moment | Cultibotics | Scoop.it

“At this week's Rework Deep Learning Summit in Boston, Google research scientist Kevin Murphy unveiled a project that uses sophisticated deep learning algorithms to analyze a still photo of food, and estimate how many calories are on the plate. It's called Im2Calories, and in one example, the system looked at an image, and counted two eggs, two pancakes and three strips of bacon.”

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Robots need your brain power to get smarter | Zero Moment

Robots need your brain power to get smarter | Zero Moment | Cultibotics | Scoop.it

“Sonia Chernova wants you to train her robot. Two years ago, Chernova and some of her fellow roboticists at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) in Massachussets launched a remote robotics lab called RobotsFor.Me, a site where users can log in and teach robots how to function in physical space.”

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Combining monocular video and SLAM to improve object recognition | MIT News

Combining monocular video and SLAM to improve object recognition | MIT News | Cultibotics | Scoop.it

“John Leonard’s group in the MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering specializes in SLAM, or simultaneous localization and mapping… Last week, at the Robotics Science and Systems conference, members of Leonard’s group presented a new paper demonstrating how SLAM can be used to improve object-recognition systems… The system uses SLAM information to augment existing object-recognition algorithms. … Despite working with existing SLAM and object-recognition algorithms, however, and despite using only the output of an ordinary video camera, the system’s performance is already comparable to that of special-purpose robotic object-recognition systems that factor in depth measurements as well as visual information.”

John Payne's insight:

The paper: "Monocular SLAM Supported Object Recognition" http://people.csail.mit.edu/spillai/projects/vslam-object-recognition/pillai_rss15.pdf

Via Slashdot: http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/15/07/26/1211220/mit-is-improving-object-recognition-for-robots

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ReWalk Robotics's exoskeleton enables paraplegic to walk busy streets of NYC | IEEE Spectrum

ReWalk Robotics's exoskeleton enables paraplegic to walk busy streets of NYC | IEEE Spectrum | Cultibotics | Scoop.it

Yesterday, a paralyzed man strapped on a pair of robotic legs and stepped out a hotel door in midtown Manhattan

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Non-metallic robot performs prostate surgery inside an MRI | IEEE Spectrum

Non-metallic robot performs prostate surgery inside an MRI | IEEE Spectrum | Cultibotics | Scoop.it

“One of the holy grails of robotic surgery is the ability to perform minimally invasive procedures guided by real-time scans from a magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, machine. The problem is the space inside MRI scanners is tight for a person, let alone a person and a robot. What’s more, these machines use very strong magnetic fields, so metal is not a good thing to place inside of them, a restriction that is certainly a problem for robots. Now researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) are developing a MRI-compatible robotic surgery tool that can overcome those limitations. Their system isn’t made of metal, but instead has plastic parts and ceramic piezoelectric motors that allow it to work safely inside an MRI.”

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This humble cactus could help fuel our drought-stricken world | Gizmodo

This humble cactus could help fuel our drought-stricken world | Gizmodo | Cultibotics | Scoop.it
As drought strikes broad regions of the world, farmers are focusing on the crops that can feed people—not the crops that can power their cars. But what if there was an energy crop that could grow where traditional crops can’t? Even in a drought? Enter the cactus.
John Payne's insight:

There's no obvious connection to robotics here, until you look at the problem of harvesting the seeds.  Solve that and the rest is easy.

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Musk-supported organization announces first wave of AI-related funding | Future of Life Institute

“The Boston-based Future of Life Institute (FLI) today announced the selection of 37 research teams around the world to which it plans to award about $7 million from Elon Musk and the Open Philanthropy Project as part of a first-of-its-kind grant program dedicated to “keeping AI robust and beneficial”.”

John Payne's insight:

The list of recipients is here: http://futureoflife.org/misc/2015awardees

The Open Philanthropy Project is here: http://www.openphilanthropy.org

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Google's neural networks create bizarre ‘Inceptionism’ art | Gizmag

Google's neural networks create bizarre ‘Inceptionism’ art | Gizmag | Cultibotics | Scoop.it

“Having taken on everyone from chess grandmasters to chefs, computers are further exploring their artistic side with computer scientists demonstrating how artificial neural networks can create works of art reminiscent of William Blake on opium using a technique called ‘Inceptionism’.”

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Chris Urmson: How a driverless car sees the road | TED

“Statistically, the least reliable part of the car is ... the driver. Chris Urmson heads up Google's driverless car program, one of several efforts to remove humans from the driver's seat. He talks about where his program is right now, and shares fascinating footage that shows how the car sees the road and makes autonomous decisions about what to do next.”

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More FRE2015 videos | RobotikaCZ

The link is to RobotikaCZ's YouTube channel, where you will find several video's from FRE2015, which took place this week in Slovenia.

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The future of AI: A non-alarmist viewpoint | Dice Insights

The future of AI: A non-alarmist viewpoint | Dice Insights | Cultibotics | Scoop.it

Maybe we should pay more attention to the artificial-intelligence researchers, rather than the alarmists.

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Eagle-eyed robot can catch the common fruit fly Gizmag

Eagle-eyed robot can catch the common fruit fly Gizmag | Cultibotics | Scoop.it
Machine vision and robotic precision have combined in a new way to further fruit fly research. Scientists at Stanford's Bio-X program have developed a robot that can catch and sort the tiny creatures much faster than a human can, though to the flies themselves it must seem like an alien abduction.
John Payne's insight:

If a robot can pick fruit flies out of the air, picking caterpillars from stems and leaves should be a cinch!

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Highlights from ICRA 2015 | Gizmag

Highlights from ICRA 2015 | Gizmag | Cultibotics | Scoop.it
The city of Seattle saw a robotic population explosion this week as the 2015 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) descended on the Washington State Convention Center.
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What might a killerbot arms race look like? | Zero Moment

What might a killerbot arms race look like? | Zero Moment | Cultibotics | Scoop.it

“Tomorrow's nimbler, self-piloted armed bots won't simply be updated tools for old-fashioned air strikes. They'll be vectors for slaughter. More likely, the lethal autonomous weapons systems (LAWS) to come will show up in a cloud of thousands or more. Each robot will be small, cheap, and lightly armed, packing the bare minimum to end a single life at a time.”

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