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Teacher Leadership Weekly
Highlights from the past week
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Student Voices: RethinkingEducation

Theory of Knowledge students share ideas on how to improve education. 1. The Physical Environment of School 2. School Structure (age grouping, schedule, etc....
ratzelster's insight:

There is lots of good ideas and lots of ideas.  It would be interesting to analyze and think what we think all of this means.

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The Danger of the "Just Right" Books and Other Helpful Reading Interventions

My mother never told me what to read.  Neither did my teachers.  Sure, I was an insatiable reader, a child that loved riding her bike to the public library only to return with the biggest bag of bo...
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Great advice in this book!  Thx for the find SusieH

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Art class word wall --punch up your classrm walls

Art class word wall --punch up your classrm walls | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
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Leave it to the art teachers to know just how to use color to make things seem more interesting and to draw a student's eye to a vocabulary word wall.  Can ordinary folks master this technique?

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Teaching Metacognition

Teaching Metacognition | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it

"Metacognition is a critically important, yet often overlooked component of learning. Effective learning involves planning and goal-setting, monitoring one's progress, and adapting as needed. All of these activities are metacognitive in nature. By teaching students these skills - all of which can be learned - we can improve student learning. There are three critical steps to teaching metacognition:

 

Teaching students that their ability to learn is mutableTeaching planning and goal-settingGiving students ample opportunities to practice monitoring their learning and adapting as necessary"
Via Howard Rheingold
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Brad Tollefson's curator insight, July 22, 2013 5:29 PM

Learning how to learn explained...

Dean J. Fusto's comment, September 3, 2013 10:03 PM
Thanks for sharing this. I don't come across many articles such as this on Metacognition. Great scoop!
Dean J. Fusto's curator insight, September 3, 2013 10:05 PM

A wonderful and useful skill to teach our students. I haven't come across many articles on metacognition, but found this on Howard Rheingold's Scoop.it page. Enjoy.

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Why is Social Media Important During a Certain Time of Day?

Why is Social Media Important During a Certain Time of Day? | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
Today we’re going to answer the question, why is social media important during certain times of the day on Facebook and Twitter? (Why is Social Media Important During a Certain Time of Day?

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Wendi Pillars
ratzelster's insight:

Thanks @wendi322 for this tip.

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Alison D. Gilbert's comment, July 23, 2013 6:06 AM
I just can't seem to remember or do this as suggested. It is not natural to me.
Alison D. Gilbert's comment, July 23, 2013 8:34 AM
know there are apps that can set up the time blog post announcements, posts from facebook and tweets from twitter. Can anyone tell me what they are and how they work?
Kave Home's comment, August 26, 2013 5:44 AM
@alison-gilbert you can use Hootsuite, it's free up to 5 social media accounts and you can chose the date, the hour, ... and have a really good overview of your publications !
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The Early-Literacy Shift: New Words, New Media, New Friends

The Early-Literacy Shift: New Words, New Media, New Friends | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it

"Literacy is changing. It really is. Even in my grade one classroom as the students begin to learn their letters and sounds, as they start to put those letters and sounds together into words, and as they take their first hesitant steps to read and write —literacy is changing.

The change in our classroom was subtle at first. When my students began writing the word we with two i’s, I smiled and talked about the more traditional spelling of the word. When students came to school with a clear understanding of what it meant to get to the next level or to have several lives, I took notice of the new vocabulary they had."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 28, 2013 7:03 PM

Putting young students together with technology creates a win-win situation in this classroom. Learn how one teacher has her students writing in blogs to share their work, using twitter, learning vocabulary (such as pingback) and much more. This post is complete with a video where students provide definitions of words and share how they use technology in their classroom.

Mariana Soffer's comment, July 29, 2013 5:53 AM
Great post, do you have a website or a blog?
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Where #CCSS & #NGSS intersect: A Focus on Argumentation

Where #CCSS & #NGSS intersect: A Focus on Argumentation | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
The July 2013 issues of NSTA's journals all feature a focus on argumentation and explanation. Explanation and Argumentation are both Practices of Science & Engineering in the new Next Generatio...
ratzelster's insight:

This is one place where there is a huge overlap of science standards & Common Core.  The trick is for science teachers to retain their science focus while helping reinforce the ELA standards.  It's not about teaching writing in science....it's about writing about science in a way that communicates the amazing things about how the world works.

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What's the Difference Between Leadership and Management?

What's the Difference Between Leadership and Management? | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it

Management and leadership practises were once just a subject for TV sitcoms – the Office's David Brent, a master of 'management speak', was celebrated as an example of all that is bad about bosses.

 

But recent scandals, such as those concerning the BBC, NHS and the banking sector, have forced the debate about management and leadership up the agenda. Employers and politicians alike are now asking how our public and private bodies should be organised – and how we can prepare the next generation of leaders.

 

Key to the problem is understanding the difference between management and leadership, says John Kotter, Konosuke Matsushita professor of leadership at Harvard University. He fears that too often, employers use the terms synonymously.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 29, 2013 6:07 PM

While management and leadership are distinct concepts, there is a natural overlap between the skills they require. Rebecca Ratcliffe explores

Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, July 30, 2013 8:41 AM

The turth is, we need both leaders and managers. One cannot exist without the other. Too often wwe look for ways to segregate ourselves along artificial lines. The key is to build bridges that unite and define, not barriers that divide and deminish. 

Enzo Guardino's curator insight, August 3, 2013 6:37 PM

Very interesting article by Rebecca Ratcliffe

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Community counts: Fostering rural STEM education

Community counts: Fostering rural STEM education | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
Nationally, 1 in 5 students attend school in a rural district. U.S. efforts to improve STEM education may unintentionally have overlooked the unique challe
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Big problem....anyone have good suggestions?

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Teaching Reading in the Digital Age

Teaching Reading in the Digital Age | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
What does it really mean to teach reading in a digital age? It means teaching both ways and also in new ways. It means going back to school and learning to read along with our students, in a world ...

Via Mel Riddile
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Lauren's curator insight, July 30, 2013 11:24 AM

Great thoughts for reading teachers 

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, August 7, 2013 2:29 PM

Earlier this summer, following a deep dive into the paradigm shifting models of design thinking and gamification in education at the annual conference of the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE 2013), I found myself settling in to a week-long study of the time-tested, best-practices pedagogy at the Reading and Writing Institutes at Teachers College, Columbia University. It felt a bit like inhabiting one portion of my brain and then taking up residence in an entirely different thinking space – both equally valid to my professional life. Searching for a way to reconcile my learning, I am left wondering most about what it means to be a reader today.

Common Ground

The educational visionaries at ISTE, who call for creating a radically different learning environment for today’s self-directed learners, can find surprising common ground with some of the basic tenets of the Lucy Calkins approach to teaching reading (at least as I understand it as a first-year attendee of the Reading Institute).

For both, student choice remains central to learning, whether students are choosing the books they want to read from a classroom library or researching how to modify classroom furniture for a project employing design theory.Another crossover, the role of the teacher as coach who provides mini-lessons on learning strategies, might succeed as easily with a teacher seated at a chart and easel as with the digital-age teacher who uses short flipped lessons to deliver directed instruction.Innovators who tout the merits of gaming as a way to fire up students about their learning, for — ISTE keynoter Jane McGonigal, for instance — surely must recognize how the storytelling narrative sparks engagement in a gaming environment; likewise, the Reading Workshop method employs “leveling up” strategies familiar to gamers to move students through “leveled” classroom libraries that present offer more challenges and require greater sophistication as a students gain mastery of reading skills.

Digital Readers Reading

What, then, does this mean for those of us who teaching readers today? I am still searching for answers to questions that won’t let go of me.

The Reading Institute puts a lot of emphasis on “eyes on print” time – that is, on classroom time given over to readers engaged in the act of reading. This requires creating a culture of readers with books in their hands and sticky notes at the ready for jotting questions and tracking observations (leading to critical thinking). As a teacher who recognizes that students read in digital contexts as well, I find myself wondering if “eyes on text” (eyes on media?) might be a better term. Or is it even the same thing?  My students are constantly reading as oodles of different kinds of text-based media cross their paths. Don’t we need to prepare them with the nuanced skills required to read in every way possible?My students who use tablets or e-readers for reading time love the easy access to digital dictionaries. This frees them to engage with their reading even more deeply. Are they absorbing vocabulary more thoroughly and accurately than the students who are too lazy or too engrossed to open a dictionary? Digital readers do not necessarily preclude commenting on texts. Students with e-readers can certainly annotate their reading with digital comments. Is this any different from the kind of critical questioning students do with pen in hand?My goal is to teach my students to develop a passion for reading, but I also want them to use any effective means that can help them go beyond the surface in their reading. I also recognize the value in sharing their ideas with others. Is there something magical about the handwritten (and easily sharable) sticky note comment favored by the Reading Institute, or can my students do just as well (better?) with a sticky note app like Popplet?The Reading Institute went to great pains to introduce lessons about the reading of nonfiction, acknowledging a new pedagogical emphasis on nonfiction in the Common Core. As a result, considerable (though not exclusive) attention at the Institute was given over to using historical fiction in classroom libraries and as “anchor texts” for mini-lessons. I want to go further. I would venture that most students don’t know enough about the variety of nonfiction forms to know the difference between what is basically made up (fiction) or basically true (nonfiction) – in my experience, they tend to see everything they read in terms of story. Students need to be able to read an article online and identify it as a blog or a news story or a reference source. They need to recognize rhetorical strategies like comparison or illustration and understand how they affect a reader. As my section leader at the Reading Institute stated, students need to question perspective and bias in every kind of writing. I wonder, are we really doing enough to address these skills in our classes?Reading also represents an intersection of design, image, and text. The picture book, at its best, uses each avenue of communication to the fullest. So I am excited to follow the Reading Workshop method and return to picture books and image-rich texts (online or otherwise) as a means of teaching reading skills. I also like how the Reading Institute breaks down the skills needed to deconstruct a page and address the increasing complexity of the relationship of image to text, as this builds from mere illustration to direct contradiction. How can teachers of reading in a digital context build upon this work? At the same time, how might we all step back and consider more thoroughly the elements of design and their relationship to meaning?Reading for pure pleasure is certainly something we still want to nurture – whether the children we teach are “trapped” by an engaging story (as one of my rising sixth-graders put it on a recent discussion board about his summer reading) or whether they follow the meandering path of their burgeoning curiosity by skipping from website to website (we used to call this browsing when we did it in libraries or bookstores). Still, what are the ways we can encourage our students to extend their reading – yes, by reading for depth and understanding in a traditional sense, but also by accessing auxiliary information available to us online, by following hyperlinks to make more connections, or by engaging in a rousing backchannel chat?At the same time, we certainly also need to teach students how to handle the distractions of reading in a digital context, just as we help them mediate the distractions of an antsy classmate or a nearby whispered tutorial. How can we do this if we never allow them to read on their own devices and in ways that are second-nature to them?

A New Generation of Readers

After participating in these two very different learning venues, I went off the grid and experienced three delicious days of beach reading. I felt the pull of the stories like the tide, and I gave into where they took me. I want my students to feel that. But since I’ve come home, I’ve caught up on my Twitter feed, read my personal and work emails, and browsed for articles related to the topic of this blog post. This is the kind of reading my students will do – and already do – on a daily basis.

What does it really mean to teach reading in a digital age? It means teaching both ways and also in new ways. It means going back to school and learning to read along with our students, in a world in which we are surrounded by text from which we must derive meaning.

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STEAM and Maker Education: Inclusive, Engaging, Self-Differentiating

STEAM and Maker Education: Inclusive, Engaging, Self-Differentiating | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
The maker movement has the opportunity to transform education by inviting students to be something other than consumers of education. They can become makers and creators of their own educational li...
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Auto Generate QR Codes in Google Spreadsheet!

Auto Generate QR Codes in Google Spreadsheet! | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
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OK...you want to spiff up your tech look.   Try using QR codes and everyone will be ooooing and ahhhhhing.  With this spreadsheet it won't be that hard.  Give it a shot....spend 15 minutes tonight or tomorrow giving it a shot.  Could be awesome.

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STEM at the beach could be oh so simple

STEM at the beach could be oh so simple | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
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Can you build an irrigation trench like this?  Wouldn't it be fun?  STEM learning doesn't have to be boring and it doesn't have to be so formal.  Playing while learning can be the best.

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Gov. Pence Signals Intent To Withdraw From Common Core Testing PARCC

Gov. Pence Signals Intent To Withdraw From Common Core Testing PARCC | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
Indiana plans to exit PARCC, one of two national testing consortia creating Common Core-aligned tests.
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Another state drops out.  Is Common Core threatened or will it continue to roll along? 

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Design thinking meets science

Design thinking meets science | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
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This is the kind of help that science teachers are going to need in order to move their thinking into alignment with #NGSS.  It isn't hard.  But we need examples and models to stimulate the professional work that we need to do.

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The Early-Literacy Shift: New Words, New Media, New Friends

The Early-Literacy Shift: New Words, New Media, New Friends | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
Even in first grade, says Kathy Cassidy, students need to learn new vocabulary, new tools to communicate & new ways to connect to the world.
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Powerful words from an expert practitioners.  Read this if you want to poke your thinking up a bit.

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Why Optimists Seem To Handle Stress Better

Why Optimists Seem To Handle Stress Better | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it

Ever wondered how it is your optimistic friend always seems to be unfazed by stress? Scientists may have pinpointed a possible reason for why.

Researchers from Concordia University found that optimists' stress hormone levels remain more stable in the face of stressful moments compared with pessimists.

 

"On days where they experience higher than average stress, that's when we see that the pessimists' stress response is much elevated, and they have trouble bringing their cortisol levels back down," study researcher Joelle Jobin, who is a Ph.D. candidate in clinical psychology at the university, said in a statement. "Optimists, by contrast, were protected in these circumstances."


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 29, 2013 5:59 PM

Ever wondered how it is your optimistic friend always seems to be unfazed by stress? Scientists may have pinpointed a possible reason for why.

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Six Paradoxes Women Leaders Face in 2013

Six Paradoxes Women Leaders Face in 2013 | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
The uncomfortable realities women still face, even as they succeed in ever-greater numbers.

Via Maria Rachelle
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Maria Rachelle's curator insight, July 26, 2013 5:30 PM

From the article: "one big hope is that women continue to bridge the gender gap in terms of pay equality and access to leadership positions. So much of the news was good last year: women were better educated than ever, we continued to claim coveted CEO roles at companies such as IBM and Yahoo.

Yet, in order to clear a path for greater advancement and parity in 2013, we need to address the difficult paradoxes that women leaders continue to face — these are the mixed messages and uncomfortable realities that complicate an arguably positive picture of progress."

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NEW RELEASE: Making Evidence-Based Claims about Literary Technique Grades 9-12!

These literacy units empower students with a critical reading and writing skill at the heart of the CCSS: making evidence-based claims about complex texts.


Via Darren Burris
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Amy Youngblood's curator insight, July 30, 2013 9:53 AM

What a great find!  These high quality units are free.  

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Preparing for the Next Generation Science Standards: Engaging in Argument from Evidence

Joe Krajcik, Michigan State University, discusses the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and Engaging in Argument from Evidence. (Length = 10 minutes, ...

Via Jeffrey Patterson
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This is a wonderful way to utilize the PEs from NGss.

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Too much collaboration?

Too much collaboration? | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
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I really like the article because it advocates for finding a good mix of collaboration and a chance to work by one's self.

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Why We Must Recreate the Wheel

Why We Must Recreate the Wheel | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
First of all, I must apologize to the physics people out there who read the title and expected this article to explain a new three-dimensional figure that would redefine transport and how we think ab
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Five Routes to More Innovative Problem Solving

Five Routes to More Innovative Problem Solving | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it

Tricky problems must be shaped before they can be solved. To start that process, and stimulate novel thinking, leaders should look through multiple lenses. 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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More about the First Day of School: Video Walk and More

More about the First Day of School: Video Walk and More | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
I am passionate about integrating tech into the classroom and feel that should start day one. Here are my goals for the first day... - Show parents/kids that tech will be a big part of our learning...
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LundTechIntegration's curator insight, July 23, 2013 11:01 AM

Great ideas for the first day of school.

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Some Questions to Ask Yourself As You Set Up Your Classroom

Some Questions to Ask Yourself As You Set Up Your Classroom | Teacher Leadership Weekly | Scoop.it
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Setting up the Fall semester classroom can be stressful...but Mrs. Ripp has some gr8 shifts in thinking we should consider as August gets closer and closer.

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