CSR
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Why CSR? The Benefits Of Corporate Social Responsibility Will Move You To Act

Why CSR? The Benefits Of Corporate Social Responsibility Will Move You To Act | CSR | Scoop.it

Recently, I connected with dozens of corporate executives of large and small companies in an effort to understand the benefits of corporate social responsibility (CSR) to the corporation.


Via Gordon McGlone
John Matthews's insight:

The secrets of an effective CSR Program? Choose a cause that you believe will make a genuine lasting difference, Set clear objectives that are measurable and engage with an implementation partner who has a proven track record of delivery. Are you a CEO who wants to act rather than talk? Call me and I'll introduce you to Children of the Mountain.

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Charles Leadbeater: Education innovation in the slums

Charles Leadbeater went looking for radical new forms of education -- and found them in the slums of Rio and Kibera, where some of the world's poorest kids are finding transformative new ways to learn.

...


Via Peter Verschuere
John Matthews's insight:

I agree with Charles that motivation is the key. We need education in poor communities to be extrinsic and the payoff to be presented up front. Children are naturally motivated to learn,  but Parents who have never been to school will not accept the loss of income by sending kids to school instead of work unless  and this is can only be done through partnership. I also note that all the innovation is in private schools or social entrepreneurs. This need not be the case! In fact I would argue it an unsustainable divisive approach.  I prefer to promote partnership with government schools. Risky yes, Harder yes but far more sustainable.

 

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Thank your hero – a crusader in #Rajasthan who freed her village from child labour

Thank your hero – a crusader in #Rajasthan who freed her village from child labour | CSR | Scoop.it
Had it not been for the efforts of this persevering ‘Anganwadi’ worker and teacher from the village of Bhuja, her village in Rajasthan would have topped India’s child labour index.
Meet forty-six-year...
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NEPAL: Chepang struggle to educate their children

NEPAL: Chepang struggle to educate their children | CSR | Scoop.it
The Chepang, one of Nepal’s most disadvantaged and marginalized indigenous groups, are struggling to educate their children. While many parents are managing to keep them in school, they worry that poverty will put an end to education.

Via Caroline
John Matthews's insight:

Providing access to school for marginalised and excluded children is just the start, thereafter they must be supported to stay in school, support provided to young girls who are so often pressurised to leave early and are abused, and to the quality of education. The answer is not more NGO "private english medium" schools. This creates a two tier system and the excluded remain excluded. NGO and government agencies must work together, government being less self serving and NGOs more transparent and proactive.

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Caroline's curator insight, January 20, 2014 5:49 PM

During the time of the civil war in Nepal, in the poor area of Humla, the parents of the little princes children, would sell everything they owned in order for their kids to avoid joining the maoist rebel army and so their children could go with Gollka. Gollka had promised their children an education and shelter, but it turned out it was a scam and he was a childtrafficer. The famlies of the little princes children became even more poor in result of selling everything, and in the future would encounter the conflict trying to give their other children the same chance of an education. This article explains that many famlies in Nepal, of the Chepang indigenous group, try to sell everything they have to give their children a chance of education, just like the parents of the little princes children. These families are so poor though, that they cannot aford to do that and their children are unable to get an education. NGO's try to help these types of families by colaborating with them and helping their children get an education, but because there is such a poor population in Nepal it is hard for the NGO's to help everyone. According to the article, Nepal has the lowest literacy rate and it will just keep on getting lower if the kids in Nepal do not get educated. The families in the article and the families from little princes both have a conflict of poverty to face to give their children the education they need.

Caroline's curator insight, January 22, 2014 11:27 AM

During the time of the civil war in Nepal, in the poor area of Humla, the parents of the little princes children, would sell everything they owned in order for their kids to avoid joining the maoist rebel army and so their children could go with Gollka. Gollka had promised their children an education and shelter, but it turned out it was a scam and he was a childtrafficer. The famlies of the little princes children became even more poor in result of selling everything, and in the future would encounter the conflict trying to give their other children the same chance of an education. This article explains that many famlies in Nepal, of the Chepang indigenous group, try to sell everything they have to give their children a chance of education, just like the parents of the little princes children. These families are so poor though, that they cannot aford to do that and their children are unable to get an education. NGO's try to help these types of families by colaborating with them and helping their children get an education, but because there is such a poor population in Nepal it is hard for the NGO's to help everyone. According to the article, Nepal has the lowest literacy rate and it will just keep on getting lower if the kids in Nepal do not get educated. The families in the article and the families from little princes both have a conflict of poverty to face to give their children the education they need.

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United Nations Global Conference for Social Change and Women & Girls Education Summit

United Nations Global Conference for Social Change and Women & Girls Education Summit | CSR | Scoop.it

Women & Girls Education Summit October 2011


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, John Matthews
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John Matthews's curator insight, March 31, 2014 11:30 PM

Anybody want to offer us girls a ticket to NYC?

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United Nations Global Conference for Social Change and Women & Girls Education Summit

United Nations Global Conference for Social Change and Women & Girls Education Summit | CSR | Scoop.it

Women & Girls Education Summit October 2011


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
John Matthews's insight:

Anybody want to offer us girls a ticket to NYC?

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Over 10m children in domestic labour

Over 10m children in domestic labour | CSR | Scoop.it
A report by the International Labour Organization calls for new regulations to protect an estimated 10.5 million child domestic labourers worldwide.

Via #BBBundyBlog #NOMORELIES Tom Woods #Activist Award #Scoopiteer >20,000 Sources >250K Connections http://goo.gl/ruHO3Q
John Matthews's insight:

Its easy to publish reports condemning parents and organisations for their role in sending children to work, and I am not suggesting we start supporting unscrupulous and morally bankrupt corporations, however at Children of the Mountain we balance our advocacy for the rights of children to a childhood and an education, by engaging on the ground with parents and providing practical support, such as our support for a dawn school for child labourers in Kathmandu slums. 10 million children working for scraps of food is a damning indictment of the priorities of those of us who are privileged, and we should be ashamed,  but lets also , together, focus on solutions that have lasting impact. www.childrenofthemountain.org

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Red Card to Child Labour Campaign takes to Times Square

The giant screens in New York City's Times Square drew attention to the ILO's Red Card to Child Labour campaign, inviting passers-by to join the global fight against child labour and download...
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CSR and the Role of Leadership - Pro Bono Australia

CSR and the Role of Leadership - Pro Bono Australia | CSR | Scoop.it
BusinessDay
CSR and the Role of Leadership
Pro Bono Australia
The big banks have elaborate Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs because they know that they attract the best graduates.
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Companies that Practice "Conscious Capitalism" Perform 10x Better

Companies that Practice "Conscious Capitalism" Perform 10x Better | CSR | Scoop.it

Companies that Practice "Conscious Capitalism" Perform 10x Better

Why should that be a surprise?


Via Alicia Douglas
John Matthews's insight:

Practicing purpose beyond profit makes more profit!

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Alicia Douglas's curator insight, April 21, 2013 8:17 PM

“The moral justification of capitalism does not lie in the altruist claim that it represents the best way to achieve ‘the common good.’ It is true that capitalism does—if that catch-phrase has any meaning—but this is merely a secondary consequence.


The moral justification of capitalism lies in the fact that it is the only system consonant with man’s rational nature, that it protects man’s survival qua man, and that its ruling principle is: justice.” — AYN RAND

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Is Corporate Social Responsibility actually Responsible? Or is it just Content Marketing?

Is Corporate Social Responsibility actually Responsible? Or is it just Content Marketing? | CSR | Scoop.it
Is Corporate Social Responsibility actually Responsible? There is increasing trend towards corporations adopting missions for good in order to bolster their external and internal marketing initiiatives.

Via gulf4good
John Matthews's insight:

Do I really care if the initial first steps on a social impact journey is decided based by marketing managers, or of the decision is based upon a desire to improve employee morale or customer loyalty? Of course not! a first step is a first step! In fact I would argue that a company that signs up to a good cause without an eye on internal and external PR is foolish and not entering into a long term sustainable partnership.

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