Crum Classroom Resources
31 views | +0 today
Follow
Crum Classroom Resources
6th grade Geography resources for my classroom
Curated by Kate Crum
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Kate Crum from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Getting Started with Primary Source Research for Teachers and Students

Getting Started with Primary Source Research for Teachers and Students | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it
The National Archives Digital Classroom: Primary Sources, Activities and Training for Educators and Students.

Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, February 17, 2013 5:19 PM

Check it out!!!

 

Lourense Das's curator insight, February 20, 2013 4:04 AM

Useful overview of resources, tools, activities and more [in English] related to USA education, but also interesting for others

lfredric's curator insight, February 20, 2013 9:34 AM

Excellent links for research  LF

Rescooped by Kate Crum from classroom tech for students and teachers
Scoop.it!

10 Techy Icebreakers for The 21st Century Teacher ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

10 Techy Icebreakers for The 21st Century Teacher ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it

Via tom jackson
more...
tom jackson's curator insight, April 13, 2013 9:10 AM

Here's an interesting way to infuse technology immediately in your classroom (first week, first day) Icebreakers not only allow for technology skill development, but also a way to get to know the interests of your students.  I wil be trying one or more of these in summer enrichment.  How about you?

James Easterling's curator insight, April 13, 2013 11:35 PM

This is full of great icebreaker ideas for developing student engagement, trust and establishing the classroom culture. Thank you for the comprehensive list. This will be a must try for me next MOD. Thanks for sharing--me likey


James Easterling's comment, April 13, 2013 11:36 PM
This is full of great icebreaker ideas for developing student engagement, trust and establishing the classroom culture. Thank you for the comprehensive list. This will be a must try for me next MOD. Thanks for sharing--me likey
Rescooped by Kate Crum from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

How is power divided in the United States government?

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-is-power-divided-in-the-united-states-government-belinda-stutzman Article II of the United States Constitution allows for three separate branches of government (legislative, executive, and judicial), along with a system of checks and balances should any branch get too powerful. Belinda Stutzman breaks down each branch and its constitutionally-entitled powers.

Lesson by Belinda Stutzman, animation by Johnny Chew.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kimberly (Pope) Kindred's curator insight, April 17, 2013 12:08 AM

TED ED is one of the best resources I found for my classes this year. Great way to supplement lessons and content.

Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

geteach.com

geteach.com | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it
Free site dedicated to help teachers educate and engage students using Google Earth

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 19, 2013 2:54 PM

GE Teach is a phenomenal site, designed by an AP teacher to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom in a way that is incredibly user-friendly. This site allows you to use Google Earth with clickable layers. With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this interactive globe puts spatial information in powerful, yet fun, student-inspired platform.  Click here for a video tutorial.


Tags:  google, virtual tours, geospatial, edtech.


Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 29, 2013 9:54 AM

Use Google Earth in the classroom with clickable layering of maps.  Great for bringing Geography into your classroom!

Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 8, 2015 5:18 AM

GTAV Technology and cartography in Geography

GE Teach is a phenomenal site, designed to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom in a way that is incredibly user-friendly. This site allows you to use Google Earth with clickable layers. With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this interactive globe puts spatial information in powerful, yet fun, student-inspired platform.

Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

19 Maps That Will Help You Put The United States In Perspective

19 Maps That Will Help You Put The United States In Perspective | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, March 18, 2013 10:30 AM

Great map tools for kids and adults to get a better understanding of relative size of US vs the world.

Heather Ramsey's curator insight, March 18, 2013 2:05 PM

This site has lots of great examples of size comparisons between the United States and other coutnries/continents around the world. Which one is the most surprising to you? Why do you think you had a different idea of the size of the place that surprised you?

Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa's curator insight, March 18, 2013 9:13 PM

A punta de TIC el mundo se achicó !

Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:10 AM

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:09 PM

As an outsider looking in the concept of the United Kingdom is a little confusing. We are taught to view Scotland as its own country, but they are countries within a larger structure. This video makes what would confuse many Americans and condenses it into a clear video that is just about 5 mins.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:38 PM

Many people often interchange the UK, Great Britain, and England, but in reality, they all describe different different things. The UK is a country of four countries, each with equal power, including Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, and Wales but they are all considered British citizens.UK is a political term, describing a country. Great Britain is a physical geographical term describing the land mass containing Scotland, Wales, and England.  The British Isles refers to both Great Britain and the Island of Ireland. All of these terms describe different things, being characterized by either political affiliation or geographic characteristics. 

Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography classroom
Scoop.it!

100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 

 

Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.


Via Seth Dixon, Ness Crouch, Catherine Smyth, Maree Whiteley
more...
Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

savvy's curator insight, September 3, 2014 12:57 PM

This just makes me realize how the world would be if we only had 100 people rather than the billions we have now.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 26, 2015 7:24 AM

A face das crianças no mundo

Rescooped by Kate Crum from Landforms and Landscapes
Scoop.it!

Gas company targets protected Manú park in Peruvian Amazon

Gas company targets protected Manú park in Peruvian Amazon | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it

Leaked documents reveal Pluspetrol is eyeing a region where biodiversity 'exceeds that of any other place on Earth'


Via Juan Carlos Hernandez, Daniel Rogers
more...
Mercor's curator insight, February 18, 2013 6:03 AM

Scooped by Steve Troletti onto Steve Troletti Nature and Wildlife Photographer

Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography classroom
Scoop.it!

All's Well? | Global Education

All's Well? | Global Education | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it

All's Well? Exploring the World of Water with Upper Primary Students is packed with lesson ideas and resources to bring the world of water to the classroom. Activities use Literacy and Numeracy general capabilities to develop Critical and creative thinking; investigations and simulation games to develop Intercultural understandings; and questioning values to encourage active global citizenship. 


Via Maree Whiteley
more...
Maree Whiteley's curator insight, February 15, 2013 3:49 AM

Download your copy here or contact your local Global Education Project for a printed copy.

Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography in the classroom
Scoop.it!

Could this mean the end of the line for the plastic water bottle?

Could this mean the end of the line for the plastic water bottle? | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it
It's a battle over billions, but both sides agree plastic bottle sales are falling, writes David Sygall.

Via dilaycock
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Africa Map Collection

Africa Map Collection | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:58 PM

This is a fun collection of maps because you can see how the European view of Africa has changed over time. These maps contain nonexistent land marks such as the Mountains of Kong, these are here because cartographers made their maps based off incorrect information and then passed this information on to others who repeated their mistakes. African was known as the dark continent not only because of European racism but because of the lack of knowledge on behalf of the Europeans. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:19 AM

While most people perceive Africa as a country rather than a continent, European cartographers were even more oblivious to the make up of the continent. How is it possible that a mountain can directly across the continent. This also raises the question, how was conquering the continent possible if this mountain sat at the frontier of the continent? Wouldn't the natives know where to escape when European settlers came to conquer their land?

Luis Cabral's curator insight, March 8, 12:02 AM

This fabulous collection of African maps from 1535-1897 represents an historical geographic vision of both Africa and colonial visions of an imagined Africa.  I chose this particular map to display because it beautifully highlights the Mountains of Kong.  For generations, European cartographers erroneously believed that this long mountain range extended north of the West African coast and across the continent.  Currently this map collection is at Plymouth State, NH, but much of it is archive online here. 


Tags: Africa, cartography, colonialism, map.

Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Holland vs the Netherlands

"What's the difference between Holland and the Netherlands?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brett Sinica's comment, April 22, 2013 8:56 PM
I have seen this video previously, and this being my second time, it is much easier to understand this time around. He tells the story of one great kingdom and all areas that are under its control or influence. With the expansion of many European countries within the last couple centuries, I can understand how people can get culture and people mixed up, even though they’re from the same place to begin with. It reminds of the Arabs, or Arabic people. They don’t necessarily come from one country or one language or one religion. They represent a vast group of people and each of them differ or relate in certain ways. At times understanding these different groups can be a challenge, but in the end that is what makes them more unique and interesting.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 3:54 PM
Well this video was fairly interesting actually. Funnily enough, my Canadian friend made me watch the Great Britain video about a month ago and so when I saw this was made by the same person and I always seem to confuse Belgium/Netherlands/Holland it seemed like something I should think about doing. The video was very informational and the narrator went over many factual things including the simple question of: Where is everything? The video mainly focuses on physical geography of people but also goes on to explain that the ‘Dutch’ living in the Caribbean are actual ‘Europeans’ because they belong to the Kingdom of the Netherlands which belongs to the European Union which by the transitive property makes them Euros.

I liked what Brett said, that cultures and groups of people typically get categorized together as one when they really aren’t and it is important to acknowledge their distinctions and understand the different groups and cultures of people.
Opslagruimte Huren in Netherlands-Salland Storage's comment, February 2, 1:13 AM
bit.ly/1SAe8f4
Rescooped by Kate Crum from The Rainforest
Scoop.it!

The Amazon Rainforest lost 7000 km2 of deforestation in 2010 ...

The Amazon Rainforest lost 7000 km2 of deforestation in 2010 ... | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it
Deforestation of the period was the lowest since records are kept and 6,2% below of the preceding year, which had been in 7464 km2. The government measures the deforestation in Brazil in annual periods from August to ...

Via Mrs. Mullins
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kate Crum from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

Awesome Stories: Primary Source Docs for Common Core

Awesome Stories: Primary Source Docs for Common Core | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it

AwesomeStories is a gathering place of primary-source information. Its purpose - since the site was first launched in 1999 - is to help educators and individuals find original sources, located at national archives, libraries, universities, museums, historical societies and government-created web sites.

Sources held in archives, which document so much important first-hand information, are often not searchable by popular search engines. One needs to search within those institutional sites directly, using specific search phrases not readily discernible to non-scholars. The experience can be frustrating, resulting in researchers leaving key sites without finding needed information.

AwesomeStories is about primary sources. The stories exist as a way to place original materials in context and to hold those links together in an interesting, cohesive way (thereby encouraging people to look at them). It is a totally different kind of web site in that its purpose is to place primary sources at the forefront - not the opinions of a writer. Its objective is to take the site's users to places where those primary sources are located. 


Via Deb Gardner, Mel Riddile
more...
Deb Gardner's curator insight, March 27, 2013 6:23 PM

Excellent digital resource when teaching with CCSS, particularly in science and social studies!

Rescooped by Kate Crum from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 26, 2015 11:08 AM

This article reminds us all of the growth-stunt that colonialism in Africa brought to the continent.  It is not surprising to see that most African countries still depend heavily on their old colonial masters for survival.  People who may casually follow African politics might think that colonialism started with the Berlin Conference and ended in 1990 or so, but one could argue that it hasn't ended due to the urgent dependency African countries still have on their old colonizers.  Africa might be the most beautiful continent in the world but has the worst story of any in the world.

Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Japan's Geographic Challenge

Stratfor examines Japan's primary geographic challenge of sustaining its large population with little arable land and few natural resources. For more analysi...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
Unlike other larger, more geographically diverse countries, Japan is faced with the problem of a general lack of farmable land and natural resources. The fact that the country is itself an island does not make things any easier for it in an economic sense. The way the country is divided up also makes for a difficult political situation, as mountain ranges create division, and therefore, political disunity.
The proximity of the Korean peninsula and China to Japan is also important to examine. Whenever Japan wishes to acquire natural resources and other economically beneficial materials, Korea is the conduit through which Japan tends to invade the mainland, usually China. Because of this, we can see how Japan’s geographic location may cause strained relationships with its neighbors, both politically and economically. Alienating two of its closest neighbors would clearly be a disastrous move for Japan, but it may be seen as necessary due to its unfortunate geographic location.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:31 PM

It would make sense to me that for a place like Japan to sustain itself successfully, it would have to have some help from other areas with more resources.  Again with the concept- people don't choose to be born, or where they are born... To be born in Japan is as unchosen by that person as it would be in any other country.  I don't think people should have to pay for resources that they do not have available, especially because they are on an island/island chain that simply doesn't have what they need.  I am really repulsed by the bartering system because of absolute indication of beyond excessive surplus and profit and greed and all that garbage that humanity reeks of.  Yeah some people are happy, but we could be completely unburdened of all negativity if we banded together to rid the world of negativity itself.  I know that Japan would be happy to receive everything that they need for no cost, but I also know that many people would be willing to work, and more willing to work, if they didn't have expenses to pay for... it would really be serving their life's purpose as a component of humankind if they worked to help others, rather than to pay their monthly rent.  I don't have a clue how I would go about organizing a movement to transform this idea into a reality, but I'll work on that.  In the mean time, I would advise supranationalism for Japan, and hope that with the alliance of other countries, they can band together and make deals that work for the greater good of their country, population, and the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 10:58 AM

This short video did a great job in explaining why Japan became expansionist in the decades leading up to WW II.  The mountainous nature of the islands and lack of arable land challenges Japan to provide food for its people.  To understand Japan you must understand her geography, this helps to understand why a country acted the way it did in the past and can be a predictor of future actions. 

Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Thinking like a Geographer

WARNING! This video contains explicit geographical scenes that may offend the non-worldy-wise.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
dilaycock's comment, March 25, 2013 10:10 PM
Love it. Thanks for this Seth. Just in time to promote Geography at parent/teacher night!
Samuel Yeats's curator insight, May 8, 2013 12:34 AM

A facetious look into the world of studying Geography. These students have obviously gone to a masive effort to explore their passion for Geography. While it may not be a stereotypically academic or intellectual piece, this video is a great representation of how a Geographer thinks broadly, critically and evaluatively.

Carmen Martinez's curator insight, August 26, 2014 12:17 PM

Interesting video!

Scooped by Kate Crum
Scoop.it!

Free Country Maps, Coupon, & Prize Giveaway! - Notebooking Pages | NotebookingPages.com

Free Country Maps, Coupon, & Prize Giveaway! - Notebooking Pages | NotebookingPages.com | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it
Free Country Outline #Notebooking pages! http://t.co/TFVcQjnwwW #homeschool #resources #geography
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography classroom
Scoop.it!

20 Classrooms From Around The World | Edudemic

20 Classrooms From Around The World | Edudemic | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it

We’ve talked about virtual field trips and connecting with other schools online many times. But what about actually seeing how your classroom stacks up to the others around the world? Julian Germain has been doing just that. He has photographed classrooms from England to the US to Nigeria to Bangladesh to Qatar. You get the idea. Below is a small sampling of his pictures and be sure to check out his website for more information / how to order the pictures as a bound book, etc.


Via Maree Whiteley
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kate Crum from Landforms and Landscapes
Scoop.it!

10 Geeky Facts About The World's Most Famous Places

10 Geeky Facts About The World's Most Famous Places | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it
For some people trivia isn't just a game, it's a way of life. Stat junkies and info nerds alike spend hours finding new minute details about places around the places, below the places, and sometimes even above the places.

Via QuizFortune, Daniel Rogers
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography classroom
Scoop.it!

Fresh water for all | Visual.ly

Fresh water for all | Visual.ly | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it
Freshwater is one of today’s most pressing developmental challenges, impacting food & agriculture, gender equality, health & sanitation, population

Via Maree Whiteley
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kate Crum from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Climate Change Infographic

Climate Change Infographic | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
Ignacio Conejo Moreno's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:52 AM

Chungo futuro se nos presenta, si no cambiamos nuestros hábitos!

Emily Ross Cook's curator insight, March 4, 2013 8:44 AM

Humans must change their ways - what are some real life recommendations for changing?

mrjacquot's curator insight, March 6, 2013 8:48 PM

For all the doubters...

Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography in the classroom
Scoop.it!

Luxury leather and the Amazon

Luxury leather and the Amazon | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it
Cattle ranches are threatening the Amazon thanks to our love of luxury leather goods. But, reports Lucy Siegle, Brazil's forests could have an unlikely ally: Gucci

Via dilaycock
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:10 AM

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:09 PM

As an outsider looking in the concept of the United Kingdom is a little confusing. We are taught to view Scotland as its own country, but they are countries within a larger structure. This video makes what would confuse many Americans and condenses it into a clear video that is just about 5 mins.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:38 PM

Many people often interchange the UK, Great Britain, and England, but in reality, they all describe different different things. The UK is a country of four countries, each with equal power, including Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, and Wales but they are all considered British citizens.UK is a political term, describing a country. Great Britain is a physical geographical term describing the land mass containing Scotland, Wales, and England.  The British Isles refers to both Great Britain and the Island of Ireland. All of these terms describe different things, being characterized by either political affiliation or geographic characteristics. 

Rescooped by Kate Crum from Geography classroom
Scoop.it!

Food 4 Thought | Oxfam Australia

Food 4 Thought | Oxfam Australia | Crum Classroom Resources | Scoop.it
Oxfam’s new interactive, online resource, Food 4 Thought, aims to support students to become ethical, informed and active global citizens through the study of English.

Via Maree Whiteley
more...
No comment yet.