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Scarlett Williams - Making Green Energy Profitable: The Boom In Distributed Renewable Energy

Scarlett Williams - Making Green Energy Profitable: The Boom In Distributed Renewable Energy | Crown Capital Eco Management | Scoop.it
Capital Crown Eco Management Renewable Energy Fraud Watch

This is a guest post written by Nick Blitterswyk, founder and CEO of Urban Green Energy (UGE).
Angela Lawrence's insight:

Capital Crown Eco Management Renewable Energy Fraud Watch


This is a guest post written by Nick Blitterswyk, founder and CEO of Urban Green Energy (UGE).

 

The distributed renewable energy (DRE) industry has gone through significant changes in the last five years, as the industry grew from a cottage industry to one with worldwide revenues of $100 billion and rising.  The market has come back down to earth from the highs of 2005 to 2009, when investors’ bets on technology companies and manufacturers went sour as supply outstripped demand.  As the latter continued to grow, profitable business models and clear leaders have emerged, and along have come opportunities. Successful IPO’s have countered a lackluster clean tech investment environment, showing that there is success to be had for companies with a winning formula.

 

SolarCity  is one stellar example: they took a pretty simple piece of technology, rooftop solar panels, and became the leading solar installer in the U.S. by revolutionizing the financial vehicles that allow customers to receive a system with no money down, at less cost than their current electricity rate, and without having to go through all the paperwork necessary to monetize government incentives.  Financing provided by SolarCity is much more than a revenue growth accelerator, it’s at the core of the business model itself.  By focusing only on states that offer adequate government incentives, a relatively small market when compared to the global potential of clean tech, SolarCity has seen its sales, and stock, succeed.  Shares in SolarCity are up more than 200% since their IPO in late-2012.  Delving beyond their annual revenues, SolarCity has surpassed $1 billion in solar energy systems deployed last year.

 

At the opposite end of the spectrum we see companies with a strong technology background that failed to figure out an adequate business model.  Take Southwest Windpower, a GE-backed distributed wind turbine manufacturer, once tipped to be the next big thing in renewable energy.  While their technology was second to none, their focus on wind turbine supply, rather than on solving their customers’ problems, led to disappointing growth.

 

Another example is solar manufacturer SunTech, which recently defaulted on its debt obligations.  SunTech’s management focused exclusively on their product, pushing to lower costs and finding itself engaged in a battle with competitors that ultimately eroded profit margins.  Throughout the renewable energy world, several manufacturers have made the mistake of waiting for customers, a fatal decision in the face of commoditization and over-supplied markets.

 

Companies like New York-based UGE merge technology with a customer-focused business model.  In order to reach scale, UGE focuses on specific market opportunities by looking for technological challenges and high barriers to entry.  A specific example are telecom towers in developing countries, where users are most in need of cheaper and more secure energy.

 

We oft hear of the penetration rate of cell phones in emerging markets, but what we don’t hear about is the enormous challenge involved in powering the towers that support those phones in countries where the grid is unreliable and, in many places, unavailable.  In many cases, these towers are powered by diesel at a very high cost.  UGE has taken a leadership position in powering towers with its technology, using off-grid wind turbines and solar energy storage. Clients include Carlos Slim’s America Movil; while most of these sites are in developing countries, the company also works with Verizon  in the U.S. for some of its remote sites.

 

UGE’s technology goes beyond remote telecommunication sites.  The same hybrid technology platform that delivers cost savings to telecom companies is also being used by multinationals such as Hilton and BMW to lower costs and become more sustainable.  Similarly, with financial firms like TD and Citibank vying for the title of “greenest” bank, wind turbines and solar energy storage systems are being used to protect bank branches against power outages with the added benefit of assisting their sustainability efforts.  UGE has achieved this by matching its technology to its business model, designing products like the Sanya Skypump EV charging station jointly with GE.

 

Altogether, DRE can no longer be looked at as a small industry.  Counting with greater energy choices is sure to create ripples that will alter the way utilities like Consolidated Edison and Duke Energy operate.  With onsite energy, companies are now able to choose where their energy comes from, and by incorporating onsite storage those same companies can choose when to draw that energy as well.  Certainly some forward-looking energy companies, such as Total  and NRG Energy, have jumped at the chance to expand their business and have invested in or purchased companies operating in the space.  Though the dust has started to settle and the winners of the clean tech boom that ended the last decade are becoming visible, the effects of increased usage of renewable energy on a distributed scale will play out with more significant results in the years to come.

 

Original article:

http://my.opera.com/scarlettwilliams01/blog/2013/06/12/making-green-energy-profitable-the-boom-in-distributed-renewable-energy

 

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http://www.luuux.com/community/capital-crown-eco-management-renewable-energy-fraud-watch

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Scarlett Williams - Global Carbon Emissions Set to Hit Alarming 400 Parts Per Million Milestone

Scarlett Williams - Global Carbon Emissions Set to Hit Alarming 400 Parts Per Million Milestone | Crown Capital Eco Management | Scoop.it
Crown Capital Eco Management

A national disaster warning: in up to five million years, this is the first time that the concentration of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere is approximately to reach 400 parts per million (ppm).
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Crown Capital Eco Management


A national disaster warning: in up to five million years, this is the first time that the concentration of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere is approximately to reach 400 parts per million (ppm).  Monday on The guardian reports, former NASA scientist James Hansen warned that levels over 350ppm would destabilize the earth’s climate, but now we have far exceeded that figure with a record-breaking weekly average of 398.5ppm recorded.  While in May 2013, researchers at the Earth Systems Research Laboratory in Hawaii expect we will hit the 400ppm milestone.

 

Aside from many other issues like global fraud for example there are many else the government should give attention to. According to The Guardian, the US government has been monitoring atmospheric carbon dioxide levels at the Mauna Loa station located at an elevation of 11,115 feet since 1958.  During the time when it was first ascertained, CO2 levels stayed at a manageable 316ppm, but in the past five decades population expansion coupled with the growth of industrialized nations hooked on fossil fuels and meat has saturated the atmosphere with heat-trapping gases.

 

“I wish it weren’t true but it looks like the world is going to blow through the 400ppm level without losing a beat. At this pace we’ll hit 450ppm within a few decades,” Ralph Keeling, a geologist with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography which operates the Hawaiian observatory, told The Guardian. It is as if it was a national disaster warning.

 

This “sobering milestone” should be a wake up call for governments to support clean energy and slash emissions, said Tim Lueker, an oceanographer and carbon cycle researcher with Scripps CO2 Group.

 

Original article:

http://my.opera.com/scarlettwilliams01/blog/2013/06/10/global-carbon-emissions-set-to-hit-alarming-400-parts-per-million-milestone

 

Related article:

http://blog.crowncapitalmngt.com/global-carbon-emissions-set-to-hit-alarming-400-parts-per-million-milestone/

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Scarlett Williams - Jakarta Crown Eco Management: Hole in the Sun

Scarlett Williams - Jakarta Crown Eco Management: Hole in the Sun | Crown Capital Eco Management | Scoop.it
Sun Hole.png

Jakarta Crown Eco Management, Hole in the Sun

Coronal holes are areas where the Sun's corona is darker, and colder, and has lower-density plasma than average. In this case it looks like a giant hole in the middle of the sun.
Angela Lawrence's insight:

Jakarta Crown Eco Management, Hole in the Sun


Coronal holes are areas where the Sun's corona is darker, and colder, and has lower-density plasma than average. In this case it looks like a giant hole in the middle of the sun. These were first found when X-ray telescopes in the Skylab mission were flown above the Earth's atmosphere to reveal the structure of the corona. An extensive coronal hole rotated towards Earth recently (May 28-31, 2013). The massive coronal area is one of the largest seen in a year or more. Coronal holes are the source of strong solar wind gusts that carry solar particles out to our magnetosphere and beyond. Solar wind streams take 2-3 days to travel from the Sun to Earth, and the coronal holes in which they originate are more likely to affect Earth after they have rotated more than halfway around the visible hemisphere of the Sun, which is the case here.

 

Watching the solar corona is like observing the patterns of  clouds in the sky.  They can form all sorts of shapes.  In June 2012, for example, there was a big bird image.  Snapped through three of NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory  extreme ultraviolet filters, this current coronal hole is caused by a low density region of hot plasma.

 

The Sun's corona, or extended outer layer, is a region of plasma that is heated to over a million degrees Celsius. As a result of thermal collisions, the particles within the inner corona have a range and distribution of speeds described by a Maxwellian distribution. The mean velocity of these particles is about 145 km/s, which is well below the solar escape velocity of 618 km/s. However, a few of the particles achieve energies sufficient to reach the terminal velocity of 400 km/s, which allows them to feed the solar wind. At the same temperature, electrons, due to their much smaller mass, reach escape velocity and build up an electric field that further accelerates ions - charged atoms - away from the Sun.  The corona is one of the sources of the solar wind.

 

Solar maximum or solar max is a normal period of greatest solar activity in the 11 year solar cycle of the Sun. During solar maximum, large numbers of sunspots appear and the sun's irradiance output grows by about 0.1%. The increased energy output of solar maxima can impact global climate and recent studies have shown some correlation with regional weather patterns.

At solar maximum, the Sun's magnetic field lines are the most distorted due to the magnetic field on the solar equator rotating at a slightly faster pace than at the solar poles. The solar cycle takes an average of about 11 years to go from one solar maximum to the next, with an observed variation in duration of 9 to 14 years for any given solar cycle.  The cycle is peaking now and is causing increased solar activity such as coronal holes.

 

Original article:

http://my.opera.com/scarlettwilliams01/blog/2013/06/07/jakarta-crown-eco-management-hole-in-the-sun

 

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http://pinterest.com/alysiapower27/crown-capital-management-jakarta-indonesia/

http://www.enn.com/sci-tech/article/46057

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Scarlett Williams - Capital Crown Eco Management Renewable Energy Fraud Watch

Scarlett Williams - Capital Crown Eco Management Renewable Energy Fraud Watch | Crown Capital Eco Management | Scoop.it
Making Green Energy Profitable: The Boom In Distributed Renewable Energy

This is a guest post written by Nick Blitterswyk, founder and CEO of Urban Green Energy (UGE).
Angela Lawrence's insight:

Making Green Energy Profitable: The Boom In Distributed Renewable Energy


This is a guest post written by Nick Blitterswyk, founder and CEO of Urban Green Energy (UGE).

 

The distributed renewable energy (DRE) industry has gone through significant changes in the last five years, as the industry grew from a cottage industry to one with worldwide revenues of $100 billion and rising.  The market has come back down to earth from the highs of 2005 to 2009, when investors’ bets on technology companies and manufacturers went sour as supply outstripped demand.  As the latter continued to grow, profitable business models and clear leaders have emerged, and along have come opportunities. Successful IPO’s have countered a lackluster clean tech investment environment, showing that there is success to be had for companies with a winning formula.

 

SolarCity  is one stellar example: they took a pretty simple piece of technology, rooftop solar panels, and became the leading solar installer in the U.S. by revolutionizing the financial vehicles that allow customers to receive a system with no money down, at less cost than their current electricity rate, and without having to go through all the paperwork necessary to monetize government incentives.  Financing provided by SolarCity is much more than a revenue growth accelerator, it’s at the core of the business model itself.  By focusing only on states that offer adequate government incentives, a relatively small market when compared to the global potential of clean tech, SolarCity has seen its sales, and stock, succeed.  Shares in SolarCity are up more than 200% since their IPO in late-2012.  Delving beyond their annual revenues, SolarCity has surpassed $1 billion in solar energy systems deployed last year.

 

At the opposite end of the spectrum we see companies with a strong technology background that failed to figure out an adequate business model.  Take Southwest Windpower, a GE-backed distributed wind turbine manufacturer, once tipped to be the next big thing in renewable energy.  While their technology was second to none, their focus on wind turbine supply, rather than on solving their customers’ problems, led to disappointing growth.

 

Another example is solar manufacturer SunTech, which recently defaulted on its debt obligations.  SunTech’s management focused exclusively on their product, pushing to lower costs and finding itself engaged in a battle with competitors that ultimately eroded profit margins.  Throughout the renewable energy world, several manufacturers have made the mistake of waiting for customers, a fatal decision in the face of commoditization and over-supplied markets.

 

Companies like New York-based UGE merge technology with a customer-focused business model.  In order to reach scale, UGE focuses on specific market opportunities by looking for technological challenges and high barriers to entry.  A specific example are telecom towers in developing countries, where users are most in need of cheaper and more secure energy.

 

We oft hear of the penetration rate of cell phones in emerging markets, but what we don’t hear about is the enormous challenge involved in powering the towers that support those phones in countries where the grid is unreliable and, in many places, unavailable.  In many cases, these towers are powered by diesel at a very high cost.  UGE has taken a leadership position in powering towers with its technology, using off-grid wind turbines and solar energy storage. Clients include Carlos Slim’s America Movil; while most of these sites are in developing countries, the company also works with Verizon  in the U.S. for some of its remote sites.

 

UGE’s technology goes beyond remote telecommunication sites.  The same hybrid technology platform that delivers cost savings to telecom companies is also being used by multinationals such as Hilton and BMW to lower costs and become more sustainable.  Similarly, with financial firms like TD and Citibank vying for the title of “greenest” bank, wind turbines and solar energy storage systems are being used to protect bank branches against power outages with the added benefit of assisting their sustainability efforts.  UGE has achieved this by matching its technology to its business model, designing products like the Sanya Skypump EV charging station jointly with GE.

 

Altogether, DRE can no longer be looked at as a small industry.  Counting with greater energy choices is sure to create ripples that will alter the way utilities like Consolidated Edison and Duke Energy operate.  With onsite energy, companies are now able to choose where their energy comes from, and by incorporating onsite storage those same companies can choose when to draw that energy as well.  Certainly some forward-looking energy companies, such as Total  and NRG Energy, have jumped at the chance to expand their business and have invested in or purchased companies operating in the space.  Though the dust has started to settle and the winners of the clean tech boom that ended the last decade are becoming visible, the effects of increased usage of renewable energy on a distributed scale will play out with more significant results in the years to come.

 

Related article:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/afontevecchia/2013/06/10/making-green-energy-profitable-the-boom-in-distributed-renewable-energy/

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Scarlett Williams - Jakarta Crown Eco Management: No environment, no economy

Scarlett Williams - Jakarta Crown Eco Management: No environment, no economy | Crown Capital Eco Management | Scoop.it
Jakarta Crown Eco Management, No environment, no economy

In the path of prosperity, modern economies devastated many of the natural resources.
Angela Lawrence's insight:

Jakarta Crown Eco Management, No environment, no economy


In the path of prosperity, modern economies devastated many of the natural resources. In the name of economic growth, industrial activity squandered ecosystems services (responsible for the maintenance of biodiversity), disfiguring nature on several fronts. Arguably, climate has been - and is being - caused by "man-economics." The goal? To make the economy grow exponentially producing in excess to meet the excessive consumption. The result? The environment threatened by excessive consumption. The result of this? Environmental depletion.

 

Unequivocally, economic output implies destruction and degradation of the environment. By itself, it is enough to guide decision-making towards the development of a new economic paradigm geared to ecological orders, not to market-led ideology.

 

If we do not change the current economic paradigm it is the very economy that increasingly plays into the abyss of destruction, as Lester Brown remembered, "the economy depends on the environment. If there is no environment, if everything is destroyed, there is no economy."

 

Regarding this line of analysis, Clovis Cavalcanti tells us that "there is no society (and economy) without an ecological system, but there can be an environment without society (and economy)." "Without recovering the environment, the economy is not saved, without recovering the economy, you don't save the environment," contextualized the U.S. ecologist Berry Commoner (1917-2012).

 

Nessa mesma linha de análise, Clóvis Cavalcanti nos diz que "não existe sociedade (e economia) sem sistema ecológico, mas pode haver meio ambiente sem sociedade (e economia)". "Sem recuperar o meio ambiente, não se salva a economia; sem recuperar a economia, não se salva o meio ambiente", contextualizou o ecologista norte-americano Berry Commoner (1917-2012).

 

While in its conventional models the traditional economy makes it a point to not include the framework or environmental constraints, because the prevailing view of the economic system as a whole extols the praises of the circular flow of wealth, imagining, therefore, an economy as an isolated system, like a human body endowed with only the circulatory system, there is no denying the enormous degree of economic dependence in relation to a finite natural ecosystem (the environment), since the fundamental nature of the economy is to extract, produce and consume.

 

The relationship of the economy (industrial activity) with the environment is intense. One cannot lose sight that the economic system is an open system that exchanges energy with the environment. In this exchange, it receives prime energy (clean) and returns it in a degraded form (dirty).

 

So, metaphorically, if the economy is a human body, the digestive tract is contemplated here, since it receives from nature and returns matter and energy in the form of waste. Reaffirming that idea, we should remember a passage from Nicholas Georgescu-Rogen (1906-94): "The economic system consumes nature - matter and energy with low entropy - and provides garbage - matter and energy high entropy - back to nature."

 

Therefore, it is of fundamental importance to subordinate the growth to the limits of the ecosystem, since growing beyond the "normal" is highly detrimental to the environment. Therefore, the new economic paradigm must converge with the ecology, since we depend on this for our own survival. The challenge is unique: produce more (welfare) with less (natural resources). Produce more quality (development), not quantity (growth).

 

Hence the maxim that we are therefore dependent on the environment, thus contradicting the speech of René Descartes (1596-1650) that "we are masters and lords of nature." For this idea of the French philosopher, the economy wasteful of natural resources, managed by "economic man-" would be acting correctly in propagating destruction, pollution and environmental degradation, since to generate wealth is generated before the destruction of nature.

 

The future of life - and especially of human life - on Earth, shall depend on the direction that we give to the economy today. If our ultimate goal is the continuity of the life of our species we should follow the prescriptions advocated by Georgescu-Rogen: "(...) one day humanity will have to reconcile development with the economic downturn." Otherwise, we will perish.

 

Original article:

http://my.opera.com/scarlettwilliams01/blog/2013/06/08/jakarta-crown-eco-management-no-environment-no-economy

 

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http://pinterest.com/alysiapower27/crown-capital-management-jakarta-indonesia/

 

http://english.pravda.ru/business/companies/05-06-2013/124751-environment_economy-0/

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