Crowdfunding
15 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Aubrey Van Assche from El Gramolo
Scoop.it!

2012: The Year Music Crowdfunding Broke - hypebot

2012 was a big year for music crowdfunding.

Via Joaquín Guzmán
Aubrey Van Assche's insight:

It was interesting to see this article mentions Amanda Palmer; I recognized her name from her TED Talk. She apparently set a record in 2012 for crowdfunding after raising $1,192,793. This isn't surprising, after hearing her speak of her passion for giving back to her fans. It's only natural they'd want to help her. That's why it is so important to connect with your fans on a personal level, instead of keeping them at a distance. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Aubrey Van Assche from independent musician resources
Scoop.it!

How To Plan Your Music Crowdfunding Campaign From Start To Finish - hypebot

How To Plan Your Music Crowdfunding Campaign From Start To Finish - hypebot | Crowdfunding | Scoop.it
Crowdfunding campaigns can take quite different forms depending on the project, the people and even the platform involved. Yet there are also similarities across the board that can be taken into account when planning your music crowdfunding campaign.

Via stan stewart
Aubrey Van Assche's insight:

This article is from the same websites that one of my others "scoops" is from. It seems like a fairly reliable source, and is more of a general guideline for how to set up a crowdfunding camgaign. 

 

It's important for anyone thinking of using crowdfunding to know how much work actually goes into it. You don't just ask for this money and expect it to come rolling in. You have to have an effective business plan and, most often, rewards for "investors". You need to spread the word, or "market", your idea and reach out to new people through networking. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Aubrey Van Assche from Crowdfunding Startups
Scoop.it!

10 Myths of Music Crowdfunding - hypebot

Crowdfunding is still relatively new but already many myths are in place. Indiegogo recently created "Ten Myths of Crowdfunding," a free download addressing major misconceptions related to crowdfunding as a whole. However at least two aren't really myths as you'll see from my music crowdfunding-focused discussion of their ten items.

As I've mentioned before, Indiegogo regularly produces great crowdfunding resources relevant to music crowdfunding.

Their free download, "Ten Myths of Crowdfunding," is the most recent I've encountered and it's well worth downloading for their extended discussion.

And, remember, don't let criticisms of music crowdfunding stand in your way.

10 Myths of Music Crowdfunding


To read the full article, click on the title.




Need a Professional Crowdfunding Campaign? Have someone assist you or do it for you:http://bfs.ag/578266/7907


The full recipe for success? Try 'Crowdfunding formula,' a presentation by Growthink's CEO, affordable too.



Via Marc Kneepkens
Aubrey Van Assche's insight:

The Myths of Music Crowdfunding-- 

This article goes over the most commonly heard and believed myths of music crowdfunding, but he also corrects them and gives tips on how to properly crowdfund, or where to find this information, and the benefits. One great point the author makes is that even if you don't reach your goal, crowdfunding is a great way to connect more deeply with your fans and even network and expand that fanbase; it's not all about the money. 

 

This source seems fairly reliable to me. The author's name is given, and the website seems like an informational one. The only thing I'm not sure of is when the article was written, but it doesn't seem to old based on the context. 

 

I added this to my list of scoops because crowdfunding is becoming a major part of the music industry. Many musicians and bands ask for support from their fans, and some offer rewards for a monthly fee, or something to that effect. And many music lovers are more than happy to help out their favorite performers. 

more...
Rescooped by Aubrey Van Assche from independent musician resources
Scoop.it!

DIY Musicians: Can You Use Kickstarter for Every Album? - Launch & Release

DIY Musicians: Can You Use Kickstarter for Every Album? - Launch & Release | Crowdfunding | Scoop.it
The thesis of our 100 Music Kickstarter Series is that crowdfunding should be adopted by musicians as part of the New DIY Music Business Cycle.

Via stan stewart
Aubrey Van Assche's insight:

DIY Music Career-- 

I added this scoop because it presents an interesting idea concerning crowdfunding. 

A DIY music business model is one that goes through a cycle of Crowdfund-Record-Release-Promote-Repeat. The indie artist interviewed in this article tried using this model, and had no debt after independently releasing her album. She is trying to repeat her last success with her next album. 

Independent musicians could become much more successful if this business model works out. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Aubrey Van Assche from Kill The Record Industry
Scoop.it!

Musician Uses Crowdfunding To Buy Back Her Music From Label

Musician Uses Crowdfunding To Buy Back Her Music From Label | Crowdfunding | Scoop.it

Amanda Zelina is a self-described “Antique hunter/Artist/Writer/Avid vinyl collector” but she’s best known by musical alias, The Coppertone, and has launched a new campaign via crowdfunding platform Indiegogo to ‘Help Free The Coppertone’ from her current recording contract by raising the necessary funds to buy back her catalogue from her former record label so that she can forge ahead and release new music.


Via Pierre Priot
Aubrey Van Assche's insight:

I think this is an incredible article that shows what musicians can do with crowdfunding. In order to buy back the rights to her songs and herself as a musician, a Canadian artist decided to use crowdfunding by offering things to her fans like skype sessions, hand-made guitars, hand-written lyrics, behind-the-scenes photos from the studio, etc. This is a great way for musicians to reach their goals, as most music lovers are more than happy to help their favorite bands and see a part of their world. Music lovers are notoriously obsessive. 

 

I added this to my collection of scoops to give an example of successful crowdfunding in music (she hasn't reached her goal yet, but she's well on her way, and doing a great job of offering unique gifts to her fans). 

more...
Pierre Priot's curator insight, June 12, 2013 8:19 AM

Crowd-funding your way out of your label deal. I'm remember fantasying this over a Vietnamese lunch, it's now being done!

Scooped by Aubrey Van Assche
Scoop.it!

Trepidation and Restrictions Leave Crowdfunding Rules Weak - New York Times

Trepidation and Restrictions Leave Crowdfunding Rules Weak - New York Times | Crowdfunding | Scoop.it
New York Times
Trepidation and Restrictions Leave Crowdfunding Rules Weak
New York Times
Crowdfunding is becoming a reality, but the question is whether it will thrive or become largely a vehicle for fraud.
Aubrey Van Assche's insight:

Crowdfunding is the idea of simply asking for investments from anyone willing to support your cause in order to fund a company or event's startup. Restrictions on crowdfunding have recently become more lenient, and the S.E.C. is less involved with these methods of startup. 

It's very important for anyone thinking of using crowdfunding (musicians do this a lot) to know these things. 

 

PROS-- 

-This is a major step in terms of freedom (that can always go wrong in America, since the people of this country seem to need restriction or they go into anarchy, but in general more freedom is a good thing). The American people voted on these acts and took a step towards less supervision and more opportunities.

-This makes it much easier for new ideas and businesses to gain attention and funding; it could be the start of a new way of doing business. 

-Small businesses should thrive under these laws.

 

CONS--

-Fraud is always a factor to consider whenever financial laws give more freedom. The S.E.C.'s limit before they start looking into these businesses for possibly being fraudulent is $100,000-- anything under that (and most company's would probably remain under that limit) isn't on their radar. 

-Not all these crowdfunded ideas/businesses will be successful; since there will be more than ever before under these new restrictions, there will be more bad investments floating around in cyberspace (but that all comes down to the investor calculating their own risk).

 

more...
No comment yet.