Crowd Funding, Micro-funding, New Approach for Investors - Alternatives to Wall Street
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Rescooped by Richard Platt from Crowdfunding Startups
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This Site Lets You Get Backers for Your Crowdfunding Project Before It Launches

This Site Lets You Get Backers for Your Crowdfunding Project Before It Launches | Crowd Funding, Micro-funding, New Approach for Investors - Alternatives to Wall Street | Scoop.it

Kickstarter says only 44 percent of its crowdfunding campaigns are successful. Provo, Utah-based startup Prefundia claims it can boost that success rate to 71 percent for anyone who uses its web platform to test out their idea for several weeks before formally committing to a Kickstarter posting. How? By drumming up buzz.

"It's specifically designed to help Kickstarter projects acquire a mass following," says Prefundia co-founder Jeff Schwarting, "so when they do launch there, they can come in with momentum and rake it in on the first day."





Via Marc Kneepkens
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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, April 10, 2014 6:56 PM

One important detail I noticed on the site: All Prefundia services are free.

Rescooped by Richard Platt from Crowdfunding Startups
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The Crowdfunding Backlash: What Do You Owe Your Backers?

The Crowdfunding Backlash: What Do You Owe Your Backers? | Crowd Funding, Micro-funding, New Approach for Investors - Alternatives to Wall Street | Scoop.it
Backers who supported Oculus Rift on Kickstarter are now angered that the company has sold to Facebook. What do crowdfunding projects owe their backers?

Oculus VR chief Palmer Luckey turned to Kickstarter to raise $2.4 million to create prototypes for the Oculus Rift headset. Billed as "the first truly immersive virtual reality headset for video games," the crowdfunding campaign attracted more than 9,500 backers. But now that the company has been sold to Facebook for more than $2 billion, some of the backers feel duped.

Countless backers of Oculus Rift vented their frustrations on the Oculus Rift Kickstarter. 

"I am saddened that the independent dream that was Oculus is now selling out to Facebook," wrote one of the project's backers. "Honestly, I feel that every single donor should get a "kickback/refund" from that $2 Billion (they'd still have plenty left over!) to put towards a Kickstarter project that isn't a masquerading golddigger. The whole idea of Kickstarter is to support people in making the world a better place through original ideas and technology, not selling out to corporate America. We already have enough politicians that do that - and you see how good that's worked out for the country. A shame and disappointment to everyone who backed Oculus; it's a damn shame."

It's reminiscent of what happened when Zach Braff's Kickstarter-funded "Wish I Was Here" sold big at Sundance and some of the film's backers complained that he had forgotten the little folks who helped the film get made.



Via Marc Kneepkens
Richard Platt's insight:

You don't own anything if you pledge $$,  so there does need to be some up front regulations for Crowdfunding before you actually invest

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, March 29, 2014 7:39 PM

It's nice to be part of a community, something big, something that makes a difference. You don't own it though by pledging a small amount of money.