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A Computer Program Finally Passed the Turing Test? Not So Fast.

A Computer Program Finally Passed the Turing Test? Not So Fast. | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Last week at Reading University, 30 judges text-chatted with a bunch of humans and a bunch of computer programs pretending to be human, and the judges tried to figure out who was who. That is the setup behind the famous Turing test—in which a computer program tries to convince an interlocutor, through free conversation on any subject whatsoever, that it is human—posited by legendary computer scientist Alan Turing in 1950 as a measure of artificial intelligence. The results out of Reading claim that one particular program, “Eugene Goostman,” has passed the Turing test, successfully tricking 10 out of 30 judges in five-minute conversations into thinking it was human. On closer inspection, though, the first question to ask is whether computers are getting smarter or people are getting dumber.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Looks like the selfiesphere, ponderingsphere, likosphere have been unleashing early enthusiasm whithout further thinking, evidencing in a way that we are indeed getting dumber... 

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Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
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Top Neuroscientist Says the Brain Is Not Computable

Top Neuroscientist Says the Brain Is Not Computable | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Miguel Nicolelis, a top neuroscientist at Duke University, says computers will never replicate the human brain and that the technological Singularity is “a bunch of hot air.”

 

“The brain is not computable and no engineering can reproduce it,” says Nicolelis, author of several pioneering papers on brain-machine interfaces.

The Singularity, of course, is that moment when a computer super-intelligence emerges and changes the world in ways beyond our comprehension.

Among the idea’s promoters are futurist Ray Kurzweil, recently hired on at Google as a director of engineering, who has been predicting that not only will machine intelligence exceed our own, but people will be able to download their thoughts and memories into computers (see “Ray Kurzweil Plans to Create a Mind at Google—and Have It Serve You”).

 

Nicolelis calls that idea sheer bunk. “Downloads will never happen,” he said during remarks made at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston on Sunday. “There are a lot of people selling the idea that you can mimic the brain with a computer.”

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Ray Kurzweil's brain might not be downloadable after all

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