cross pond high tech
72.2K views | +60 today
Follow
cross pond high tech
light views on high tech in both Europe and US
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

40 Years Later: Apple 3.0

40 Years Later: Apple 3.0 | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

In the past 40 years our personal computers have, of course, become immensely more powerful and convenient, but the roots of our interest in personal computing haven’t changed. And, against many odds Apple, has become a giant, world-spanning, immensely rich company.

In retrospect, we can see three Apple eras.

 

Apple 1.0 was a turbulent period: The rise of the Apple ][, its loss to the IBM PC and Microsoft; the hope and trouble with the Macintosh; Jobs forced out followed by a succession of “professional” CEOs and progressively deteriorating finances.

In retrospect, Jobs’ departure from Apple was one of the best things that happened to him and the company he co-founded. If hadn’t left for an outside tour, the Pixar success and the NeXT technical achievements and business challenges, he wouldn’t have been able to return and jump start the company’s next phase.

 

Apple 2.0 began in late 1996 when Jobs managed what turned out to be a reverse acquisition of Apple. We owe much gratitude to then-CEO Gil Amelio who unwittingly saved the company hiring Steve to “advise” him. Jobs’ advice? Show Amelio the door and install himself as “interim” CEO. Jobs then made an historic deal with Bill Gates which gave him time to let his team of NeXT engineers completely rebuild the Mac OS on a modern Unix foundation. Steve also rummaged through the company and found Jony Ive who gave us the colorful iMacs, the first of a series of admired designs.

What followed is recognized as the most striking turnaround story in any industry, one that has been misunderstood and pronounced as doomed at almost every turn. The list of Jobs’ “mistakes” includes killing the Macintosh clone program by canceling Mac OS licenses; getting rid of floppies and, later, CD/DVD-ROMs (mostly); entering the crowded MP3 player field; introducing iTunes and the micropayment system; the overpriced, underpowered $500 iPhone; the stylus-free iPad (ahem)…

We’ve seen the punishment for these mistakes: Apple sells approximately $250B worth of iPhones every year, that’s six phones every second manufactured and delivered to more than 130 countries.

Despite it’s enormous size and influence, Apple’s business remains simple to understand. The company makes personal computers, as illustrated in this telling line-up:

 

Personal computers, small, medium and large.

Everything else Apple does — from iTunes to iCloud storage, apps and accessories — has one and only one raison d’être: Push up the volumes and margins of the company’s personal computers.

Steve Jobs left us in early October 2011, Too Soon, as I wrote in my heartfelt homage to the once unmanageable co-founder who turned into a manager extraordinaire, captain of industry, and editor-in-chief of a team of designers, engineers, supply-chain managers, and finance experts.

We’re now in the Apple 3.0 era, under Tim Cook’s leadership.

 

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

"Apple sells approximately $250B worth of iPhones every year, that’s six phones every second manufactured and delivered to more than 130 countries." A nice and very well written happy birthday anticipated note as Apple is turning 40 and keeps being both exciting, challenging, and not fully predictable. By one of my former board members.

more...
Buzzy Bee's curator insight, March 31, 4:35 PM

"Apple sells approximately $250B worth of iPhones every year, that’s six phones every second manufactured and delivered to more than 130 countries." A nice and very well written happy birthday anticipated note as Apple is turning 40 and keeps being both exciting, challenging, and not fully predictable. By one of my former board members.

Buzzy Bee's curator insight, March 31, 4:53 PM

"Apple sells approximately $250B worth of iPhones every year, that’s six phones every second manufactured and delivered to more than 130 countries." A nice and very well written happy birthday anticipated note as Apple is turning 40 and keeps being both exciting, challenging, and not fully predictable. By one of my former board members.

Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Mac Pro: Seymour Cray Would Have Approved by @gassee

Mac Pro: Seymour Cray Would Have Approved by @gassee | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

The original 128K Mac was 13.6” high, 9.6” wide, 10.9” deep (35.4 x 24.4 x 26.4 cm) and 16.5 lb (7.5 kg). Today’s Mac Pro is 9.9″ by 6.6″ (25 by 17 cm) and weighs 11 lb (5 kg) — smaller, shorter, and lighter than its ancient progenitor. Open your hand and stretch your fingers wide: The distance from the tip of your pinky to the tip of your thumb is in the 9 to 10 inches range (for most males). This gives you an idea of how astonishingly small the Mac Pro is.

At 7 teraflops, the new Pro’s performance specs are impressive…but what’s even more impressive is how all that computing power is stuffed into such a small package without everything melting down. Look inside the new Mac Pro and you’ll find a Xeon processor, twin AMD FirePro graphics engines, main memory, a solid-state “drive”, driven by 450W of maximum electric power… and all cooled by a single fan. The previous Mac Pro version, at only 2 teraflops, needed eight blowers to keep its GPU happy.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Interesting story linking energy density, Seymour Cray, the Bell Labs and the 64bit A7 chip... not mentioning the Mac Pro's real size.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

A Snapshot Of Apple's Monster September Quarter

A Snapshot Of Apple's Monster September Quarter | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

As you can see from the chart below, which was provided for us by BI Intelligence, Apple's $42.12 billion in revenue is a big 12% jump from the same quarter a year ago. It was Apple's best September quarter ever — thanks in large part to the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, which continue selling like hotcakes; the iPhone in general accounted for 56% of the company's revenue this quarter. But the real surprise is the Mac, which had its best quarter in Apple's history with 5.52 million unit sales; the Mac accounted for more of Apple's revenue than the iPad (16% versus 13%, respectively). Apple expects an even bigger December quarter, projecting $63.5 billion to $66.6 billion in revenue for the holiday season — that would make it the company's most successful quarter in history.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Who said that the Mac is dead ?

more...
Rescooped by Philippe J DEWOST from pixels and pictures
Scoop.it!

The Ratio Of PCs To Macs Sold Has Fallen To Levels Not Seen Since The 1990s

The Ratio Of PCs To Macs Sold Has Fallen To Levels Not Seen Since The 1990s | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

It's important to note that this chart only shows PCs vs. Macs--full-fledged computers that Apple actually doesn't sell that many of. (Mac sales are growing nicely, in stark contrast to the PC market, but they aren't blowing any doors off).

 

If the chart included sales of iPhones and iPads, the ratio of PCs sold to Apple products sold would look quite different. And given that the distinction between "a PC" and a tablet or smartphone is becoming ever more blurred, the latter chart would actually be more meaningful.

more...
No comment yet.