cross pond high tech
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cross pond high tech
light views on high tech in both Europe and US
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What does Google want with HTC's smartphone business?

What does Google want with HTC's smartphone business? | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
Google has announced it’s acquiring a $1.1bn chunk of HTC’s smartphone business, and with it providing the once leading Taiwanese phone brand a much needed lifeline. But what does Google want with part of a smartphone business?Google isn’t buying the whole of HTC, just a relatively large part of the Taipei-based company’s smartphone business and not its Vive virtual reality headset business. Google gains half of HTC’s research and development team – about 2,000 people – and a non-exclusive license for HTC’s intellectual property, allowing it to take advantage of some of HTC’s advances in smartphone technology.HTC gets a cash injection, which will help it survive in some very competitive markets, and Google gets to continue its “big bet on hardware” according to Rick Osterloh, the company’s senior vice president for hardware.It’s “a business decision to have access to one of the best R&D teams”, said Neil Shah, research director at Counterpoint Technology Market Research. But it’s also “a sort of emotional decision to save its close partners”.Little history of hardwareWhile Google is the creator of the Android operating system, which is now used on more than 2bn devices a month, or 89% of mobile devices according to IDC, it has only dabbled with making its own smartphones and tablets. It routinely partnered with firms such as HTC, LG and Huawei to make the Nexus series of a devices, which sold in low volumes and acted as showcases for each new version of Android.Google bought Motorola in 2011 for $12.5bn (£9.24bn), and while it ran it as a separate company selling smartphones aimed at the low end, the acquisition was really about a large stock of important patents.“Its main reasoning was to acquire Moto’s patent portfolio so as to protect against Apple (and Microsoft) while also providing stiffer competition to Samsung (although Google would never admit this),” said David McQueen, research director at ABI Research.Google sold Motorola to China’s Lenovo in 2014 for $2.9bn without the collection of patents.
Philippe J DEWOST's insight:
Hardware Is Not Dead. Talent is what matters.
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Interesting chart about "dumbphone" vendors evolution

Interesting chart about "dumbphone" vendors evolution | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
The evolution of the non-smart phone market. Who will be around in 3 years to still make them?
Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

It took Nokia only 5 years to lose its software sovereignty and become irrelevant in thsmartphone market. What about the dumbphone one?

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University of Cambridge study finds 87% of Android devices are insecure

University of Cambridge study finds 87% of Android devices are insecure | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

It's easy to see that the Android ecosystem currently has a rather lax policy toward security, but a recent study from the University of Cambridge put some hard numbers to Android's security failings. The conclusion finds that "on average 87.7% of Android devices are exposed to at least one of 11 known critical vulnerabilities."

Data for the study was collected through the group's "Device Analyzer" app, which has been available for free on the Play Store since May 2011. After the participants opted into the survey, the University says it collected daily Android version and build number information from over 20,400 devices. The study then compared this version information against 13 critical vulnerabilities (including the Stagefright vulnerabilities) dating back to 2010. Each individual device was then labeled "secure" or "insecure" based on whether or not its OS version was patched against these vulnerabilities or placed in a special "maybe secure" category if it could have gotten a specialized, backported fix.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

OEMs seems to be the core issue while Google's own Nexus hardware  looks more secure (or less vulnerable depending on how you look at this)

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The Wild Ride / Fall Of HTC

The Wild Ride / Fall Of HTC | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

HTC was the first company to ride the Android wave to smashing success. It is also the first company to crash on the Android wave. Here's a look at its revenue growth over the last 16 quarters. 

What happened to HTC? Samsung. It released its phones on more carriers and it marketed the heck out of them. HTC was left in the dust.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

There are two sides to the Android Wave. Switching slopes may happen much faster than expected.

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