cross pond high tech
115.7K views | +1 today
Follow
cross pond high tech
light views on high tech in both Europe and US
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

The iPhone Unsung Sine Qua Non

The iPhone Unsung Sine Qua Non | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

The iPhone’s 10th birthday was a happy opportunity to look once again at Steve Jobs’ masterclass in storytelling and positioning, and to contemplate, with incredulous gratitude, the enormity of the consequences. As Horace Dediu, our nonpareil tech historian and poet, recently remarked with his trademark humor, The First Trillion Dollars is Always the Hardest [as always, edits and emphasis mine]:

“In its first 10 years, the iPhone will have sold at least 1.2 billion units, making it the most successful product of all time. The iPhone also enabled the iOS empire which includes the iPod touch, the iPad, the Apple Watch and Apple TV whose combined total unit sales will reach 1.75 billion units over 10 years. This total is likely to top 2 billion units by the end of 2018.

[…] iOS will have generated over $1 trillion in revenues for Apple sometime this year.

In addition, developers building apps for iOS have been paid $60 billion. The rate of payments has now reached $20 billion/yr.

No one saw it coming, Apple execs included. For their part, the high tech incumbents made many infelicitous statements, only to be steamrolled when the iPhone and, later, Android changed everything. The Smartphone 2.0 wasn’t just a one-to-one communication device, it influenced media creation and consumption, transformed everyday commerce with in-phone wallets and touch ID, turned social networking into a ubiquitous tool. It even forced Enterprise information systems to completely rethink and retool their infrastructure — this wasn’t simply a computer with a “smaller form factor”.

In retrospect, the ascendency of Smartphone 2.0 and the way it has shaped our culture seems obvious and natural. But the celebration and contemplation overlooks a crucial Sine Qua Non, a necessary (but not sufficient) condition: Unlocking the carriers’ grip on handset specifications, marketing, and content distribution.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Fascinating Monday Note by Jean-Louis Gassée, reminding us that while much has been said about the original iPhone’s success factors (an innovative multi-touch interface, a never-seen-before combination of cell phone, iPod and Internet “navigator”) we are often missing one crucial element: removing the carrier’s control on the iPhone’s features and content.

Quoting Horace Dediu, “In its first 10 years, the iPhone will have sold at least 1.2 billion units, making it the most successful product of all time. The iPhone also enabled the iOS empire which includes the iPod touch, the iPad, the Apple Watch and Apple TV whose combined total unit sales will reach 1.75 billion units over 10 years. This total is likely to top 2 billion units by the end of 2018."
Amazed that iOS will have generated over $1 trillion in revenues for Apple sometime this year."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

How Xiaomi lost $40bn: Where it all went wrong for the 'Apple of the East'

How Xiaomi lost $40bn: Where it all went wrong for the 'Apple of the East' | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
It was just four days after Christmas 2014, and for Chinese smartphone company Xiaomi, the presents kept on coming as it announced a funding round of $1.1 billion (£850 million) at a valuation of $45bn. Just 18 months on from Xiaomi's last funding round, new analysis of its business suggests it is worth less than $4 billion. So what happened to the world's once most valuable startup?
Philippe J DEWOST's insight:
Oops. In french we have a saying about Le Capitole & La Roche Tarpéienne ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Apple Watch: Why Let Facts Cloud The Debate?

Apple Watch: Why Let Facts Cloud The Debate? | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

The absence of official numbers for the Apple Watch leads to speculation that the device is a flop — why else would Apple hide the numbers? But the company’s penchant for secrecy shouldn’t prevent us from looking at a few facts, and from thinking about the company’s long game.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

You better Watch this enjoyable JL Gassée feature :-)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Apple's $1 Billion Bet On Didi Chuxing, & 12 Big Questions About What's Next For Cars | F@stCompany

Apple's $1 Billion Bet On Didi Chuxing, & 12 Big Questions About What's Next For Cars | F@stCompany | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

How widely and how quickly will autonomous cars be accepted? As hard as it might be for an urbanite to imagine, many people love their cars. And if early autonomous vehicles cause a few well-publicized accidents, fear of the unknown could slow the trend, even to a halt.

Is owning a car factory an advantage or a disadvantage? In the minds of many from Silicon Valley, "Detroit" is a euphemism for inept. They believe the most important part of a car is its software, and they're probably right. But isn’t a century’s worth of expertise worth something? And don’t get carried away about Tesla: Last year it delivered 50,580 cars, approximately one-quarter of one percent of Detroit's output.

Is ride-sharing a commodity product? In Brooklyn, I can use a car-hailing app to get Uber, Lyft, Juno, or a taxi. I don’t see any significant difference between any of the services, each of which arrive quickly, charge similar fares, and offer clean cars and knowledgeable drivers. Selling a commodity tends to be a pretty awful business.

How long can ride-sharing companies like Uber and Lyft take a loss on many of the rides they provide, in their race to garner riders and drivers? "There’s never been a market as subsidized as this," one venture capitalist told me. "We’ll only know the winners and losers after that settles down."

Will governmental regulations slow or speed this transition? The environmental benefits of electric vehicles and fewer cars on the road are clear. Yet cities like New York, Austin, Berlin, and Paris have at different times threatened to strangle car-sharing with regulations. Look at the airline business: governments like regulating travel, for better or for worse.

What kind of "driver" or "passenger" insurance will be required? The average American driver now pays a bit less than $1000 per year for auto insurance. But who is responsible when driverless cars collide?

Will we continue to personally own cars, or will we instead have monthly subscriptions to companies that will provide all the rides we need? Subscription services seem likely, but if my current subscriptions—to companies like Time Warner Cable and Verizon—are any model, quality suffers and prices creep up.

Why is it so difficult to design a driver-friendly dashboard? Mapping services and accurate engine diagnostics are welcome additions to the information a driver can see, but more data has resulted in cluttered screens using interactive controls designed for phones or laptops. Steve Jobs understood that the user interface was the most important part of any consumer technology. Can Apple solve this problem?

Are Uber and Lyft drivers employees or contractors? This is an issue of short-term importance, but is caught up in a broader societal concern: How to define those who participate in the so-called ‘gig economy.’

Who has the most important leverage? The company that designs a car's software? The manufacturer? Or is it Uber, whose app is used by so many consumers? As with any nascent transition, it's hard to know what will emerge as the most important bottleneck.

Can any ride-sharing company become a truly international brand, or will local services trump those ambitions? Uber is losing billions of dollars trying to snare a leading market share in Asian countries. No one know exactly how much resistance it will face from governments that prefer local providers.

How strong are the network effects that Uber gains by being such a well-funded first mover? Benchmark VC Bill Gurley likes to point to this tweet as a key reason that Uber will continue to thrive. But if car-sharing has as much subsidization and government interference as the airline industry, will those network effects hold true?

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Which of the 12 questions raised by Apple's investment in Didi do you favor ?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

40 Years Later: Apple 3.0

40 Years Later: Apple 3.0 | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

In the past 40 years our personal computers have, of course, become immensely more powerful and convenient, but the roots of our interest in personal computing haven’t changed. And, against many odds Apple, has become a giant, world-spanning, immensely rich company.

In retrospect, we can see three Apple eras.

 

Apple 1.0 was a turbulent period: The rise of the Apple ][, its loss to the IBM PC and Microsoft; the hope and trouble with the Macintosh; Jobs forced out followed by a succession of “professional” CEOs and progressively deteriorating finances.

In retrospect, Jobs’ departure from Apple was one of the best things that happened to him and the company he co-founded. If hadn’t left for an outside tour, the Pixar success and the NeXT technical achievements and business challenges, he wouldn’t have been able to return and jump start the company’s next phase.

 

Apple 2.0 began in late 1996 when Jobs managed what turned out to be a reverse acquisition of Apple. We owe much gratitude to then-CEO Gil Amelio who unwittingly saved the company hiring Steve to “advise” him. Jobs’ advice? Show Amelio the door and install himself as “interim” CEO. Jobs then made an historic deal with Bill Gates which gave him time to let his team of NeXT engineers completely rebuild the Mac OS on a modern Unix foundation. Steve also rummaged through the company and found Jony Ive who gave us the colorful iMacs, the first of a series of admired designs.

What followed is recognized as the most striking turnaround story in any industry, one that has been misunderstood and pronounced as doomed at almost every turn. The list of Jobs’ “mistakes” includes killing the Macintosh clone program by canceling Mac OS licenses; getting rid of floppies and, later, CD/DVD-ROMs (mostly); entering the crowded MP3 player field; introducing iTunes and the micropayment system; the overpriced, underpowered $500 iPhone; the stylus-free iPad (ahem)…

We’ve seen the punishment for these mistakes: Apple sells approximately $250B worth of iPhones every year, that’s six phones every second manufactured and delivered to more than 130 countries.

Despite it’s enormous size and influence, Apple’s business remains simple to understand. The company makes personal computers, as illustrated in this telling line-up:

 

Personal computers, small, medium and large.

Everything else Apple does — from iTunes to iCloud storage, apps and accessories — has one and only one raison d’être: Push up the volumes and margins of the company’s personal computers.

Steve Jobs left us in early October 2011, Too Soon, as I wrote in my heartfelt homage to the once unmanageable co-founder who turned into a manager extraordinaire, captain of industry, and editor-in-chief of a team of designers, engineers, supply-chain managers, and finance experts.

We’re now in the Apple 3.0 era, under Tim Cook’s leadership.

 

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

"Apple sells approximately $250B worth of iPhones every year, that’s six phones every second manufactured and delivered to more than 130 countries." A nice and very well written happy birthday anticipated note as Apple is turning 40 and keeps being both exciting, challenging, and not fully predictable. By one of my former board members.

more...
Buzzy Bee's curator insight, March 31, 2016 4:35 PM

"Apple sells approximately $250B worth of iPhones every year, that’s six phones every second manufactured and delivered to more than 130 countries." A nice and very well written happy birthday anticipated note as Apple is turning 40 and keeps being both exciting, challenging, and not fully predictable. By one of my former board members.

Buzzy Bee's curator insight, March 31, 2016 4:53 PM

"Apple sells approximately $250B worth of iPhones every year, that’s six phones every second manufactured and delivered to more than 130 countries." A nice and very well written happy birthday anticipated note as Apple is turning 40 and keeps being both exciting, challenging, and not fully predictable. By one of my former board members.

Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Swiss watchmakers are hurting thanks to Apple and Samsung

Swiss watchmakers are hurting thanks to Apple and Samsung | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Smartwatches are growing fast, and last quarter, the budding product category shipped more devices than Swiss watches for the first time ever.

According to new data from Strategy Analytics, charted for us by Statista, the global smartwatch shipments reached 8.1 million units in the fourth quarter of 2015, up more than four times what it shipped in the previous year. In the same period, Swiss watches shipped 7.9 million units, down 5% from last year.

Apple and Samsung led the growth, with each accounting for 63% and 16% of the overall smartwatch market, respectively.

Neil Mawston, Executive Director at Strategy Analytics, said part of this had to do with the Swiss watchmakers' slow response to the development of smartwatches.

"The Swiss watch industry has been sticking its head in the sand and hoping smartwatches will go away," he wrote. "Swiss brands, like Tag Heuer, accounted for a tiny 1 percent of all smartwatches shipped globally during Q4 2015, and they are long way behind Apple, Samsung and other leaders in the high-growth smartwatch category.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

It is just a question of time...

more...
James Moore's curator insight, February 22, 2016 6:03 AM

We can bundle an Apple Smart Watch into any of our iPhone plans on any network - please contact me for further information - Business tariffs only. 

Juan Ortega's curator insight, May 20, 2016 4:53 AM
referentes formas y modelos de smartwatches
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Apple Might Be Preparing for P2P Payments, In Talks With Banks

Apple Might Be Preparing for P2P Payments, In Talks With Banks | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Apple Inc. is in discussions with US banks to develop a mobile-to-mobile payment service that would let users transfer money to one another from their phones, which seems to be something very similar to Venmo and PayPal.

Apple’s own payments system Apple Pay along with other mobile payment systems has been focusing on moving customers away from their wallets, cash, checks and cards in mobile-to-merchant relationships. The new service will be entering the highly competitive space of mobile-to-mobile transactions where PayPal and Venmo have significant shares.

In July, LTP reported that Apple had filed a patent application titled, “Person-to-Person Payments Using Electronic Devices” to the US Patent and Trademark office. Apple has proposed using mobile devices to make payments between persons through various technologies like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and near-field communication (NFC). Apple filed the patent on September 30, 2014 and credits Apple’s Senior Wireless Software Architect Ahmer A. Khan and Senior Director of Engineering Timothy Hurley for the invention. It got published on July 2, 2015.

What might be really interesting is that from the July patent, it looks like it might have a proximity P2P payment system apart from remote capabilities. It actually talks about the process in which a user will launch a Passbook or wallet app, such as Apple Wallet to detect “nearby devices” they want to send payments to and plug in whatever amount they want to send. The payment would then be authenticated by multiple procedures.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Apple’s CEO Tim Cook recently gave a speech in Trinity College in Dublin, where he shared his insights on the way digital payments will conquer the space, saying, “Your kids will not know what money is.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

(Xcode)Ghost in the Machine: Apple, Developers Unwittingly Aid App Store Malware

(Xcode)Ghost in the Machine: Apple, Developers Unwittingly Aid App Store Malware | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Tens, if not hundreds of thousands of non-jailbroken devices are believed infected after a Trojan compiler malware struck in China.


It involves a maliciously modified version of the XCode integrated development environment (IDE) -- a nasty trick that places it among a family of malware known as "compiler malware".  While not a wholly new strategy, this is the first time that we've seen proof of such a strategy being used to target the iOS crowd.  It's also remarkable in its ability not only to threaten users of non-jailbroken devices but every version of iOS, as well.


And by the looks of it, it's a very succesful indeed as it in effect transforms Apple's walled garden and singular source -- an approach that for so long helped to secure Apple's userbase -- into a digital weapon to attack users.  After all developers trust XCode -- they have to because they have no other choice.  But if they get their copy of Apple's software from a third party (as many even in the U.S. do) they may find their apps secretly Trojanized.


And to make matters worst, in this case Apple is the Trojan dealer, not some sketchy piracy site.  iOS users trust the App Store -- because they have to.  Officially, Apple contends any other source of apps for the iPhone is illegal.  But in this recent breach Apple was very cleverly -- and some would say alarmingly easily -- tricked into distributing malware to 25,000+ iPhone owners.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Babel minute 6 : Very interesting piece putting Apple iOS security in context, and explaining what lead Apple to currently clean its Appstore from infected apps.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

ExtremeTech : The iPad Air 2, with a tri-core CPU, is almost as fast as a modern PC

ExtremeTech : The iPad Air 2, with a tri-core CPU, is almost as fast as a modern PC | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

the iPad Air 2 is powered by the A8X SoC — a chip with three billion transistors, and a tri-core CPU that gets uncomfortably close to laptop levels of performance, with a decent GPU to boot.

.../...

the A8X now has a Geekbench score that is very close to a dual-core Core i5-4250U — the Haswell chip that’s inside the mid-2013 13-inch MacBook Air. The A8X CPU manages single- and multi-threaded scores of 1812 and 4477 — while the Core i5-4250U is at 2281 and 4519

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

#HardwareIsNotDead - Love the conclusion: "unless you need a PC for high-end gaming or multimedia editing, the iPad Air 2 and A8X SoC proves that we’re now getting scarily close to a point where tablets can replace laptops. If I was a chip maker, or a laptop OEM, I’d be a little scared of Apple right now — clearly, its chip design team is a force to be reckoned with."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Number of People Installing Apple's iOS 8 Stalls

Number of People Installing Apple's iOS 8 Stalls | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

The number of people upgrading to Apple’s new iOS 8 mobile operating system has seemingly stalled at less than 50 percent, amid some highly publicized early glitches. The company’s developer site shows that 47 percent of Apple users who connected with the App Store were running the latest version of the software as of Sunday, roughly three weeks after its Sept. 17 introduction. That’s a slower pace than occurred with the previous operating system, iOS 7, which was installed on nearly 70 percent of Apple devices over a comparable period, according to data from the tracking firm Mixpanel.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Oversatisfaction from iOS7 users or waiting for Yosemite (and iCloud drive homogeneous behavior) ?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Apple responds to bent iPhone 6 complaints

Apple responds to bent iPhone 6 complaints | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

By now, you've likely heard a thing or two about the new iPhones' flexibility, and Apple has offered a word on the matter. The Wall Street Journal reports that the Cupertino-based outfit only received nine complaints of bent devices and that the damage occurring due to regular use is "extremely rare." It also maintains that both the new iPhone 6 and its larger sibling went through durability testing to ensure they'd stand up to daily use. Of course, the interwebs have been littered with videos of folks purposely trying to flex their mobile wares in far from "normal" conditions. Unfortunately, there's no word on if tight trousers are in fact to blame.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

iPhone 6 : Will it bend ? (long time fan of the "will it blend" video series)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Chinese Smartphone Maker Xiaomi doubles its market share with 15 Million Signups For Its Newest Phablet

Chinese Smartphone Maker Xiaomi doubles its market share with 15 Million Signups For Its Newest Phablet | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

XIAOMI DOUBLES ITS MARKET SHARE: Xiaomi shipped 11 million devices in the first quarter of 2014, according to a statement from the company. That amounts to year-over-year growth of 146%, faster growth than any other smartphone vendor globally during the quarter.

Xiaomi's global market share of shipments doubled compared to last year, to 4%. The results have rocketed it into the top rankings, and Xiaomi now numbers among the eight largest smartphone vendors in the world. The growth is impressive and disruptive. Xiaomi began selling handsets just over two years ago and is now larger than legacy vendors like Nokia and Motorola — companies that were recently acquired for $7.2 billion and $3 billion, respectively. 

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

That's more iPhones than Apple sold the weekend the iPhone 5S launched.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

The iPad Is a Tease

The iPad Is a Tease | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

As Apple is about to release its latest quarterly numbers, new questions arise about the iPad’s “anemic” growth. The answer is simple – but the remedies are not.

The iPad isn’t growing anymore. What happened? 

In anticipation of Apple’s latest quarterly numbers – they’ll be announced on April 23rd – the usual prerelease estimates swirl around the Web. You can find Yahoo’s summary of analysts’ estimates here; Paul Leitao’s Posts At Eventide provides a detailed and tightly reasoned history and forecast for the March 2014 quarter.

The consensus is that for the company as a whole, there won’t be any surprises: Apple will meet the guidance stated in its January 27th earnings call. Revenue will be down, as befits the quarter following the Christmas shopping frenzy, but profit per share (EPS) will be up a bit.

Boring. With one glaring exception:

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Interesting piece echoing an old blog post I wrote 4 years ago while CEO at imsense — http://j.mp/views-iPad

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Apple joins SoftBank’s Vision Fund with $1-billion investment

Apple joins SoftBank’s Vision Fund with $1-billion investment | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Silicon Valley giant Apple Inc. on Wednesday confirmed that it is investing $1 billion (approximately Rs 6,793 crore) in Japanese telecom major SoftBank Group’s Vision Fund, an estimated $100-billion (approximately Rs 68 lakh crore) venture that will oversee the development of new technologies. Taiwanese electronics manufacturer Foxconn and the family of the Oracle corporation’s chairman Larry Ellison are also expected to invest in the fund, the Wall Street Journal reported.

Apple believes the move “will help ‘speed the development of technologies that may be strategically important” to it, company spokesperson Kristin Huguet said. Apple has rarely ever invested in venture capital companies before.

While SoftBank will itself invest approximately $25 billion (approximately Rs 17 lakh crore) in its Vision Fund, it will be back largely by the Saudi Arabian government. American telecom equipment company Qualcomm Inc is also expected to put in an investment.

The SoftBank Vision Fund is expected to close its fundraising efforts by mid-2017.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

When $1Billion buys you 1% of a funding round #OrderOfMagnitude

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

SoftBank is buying ARM for $32 billion — because everything’s a computer now

SoftBank is buying ARM for $32 billion — because everything’s a computer now | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Japan’s SoftBank is buying U.K.-based chip design firm ARM Holdings for about $32 billion, according to the FT.

Why? Everything is a computer now, and ARM has been one of the winners of the mobile revolution.

ARM designs chips — but doesn’t actually make them — for a huge variety of devices. It dominates the market for smartphones — Apple is a big client, as is Samsung — and its chips shows up in other consumer gadgets, as well as more-industrial-like devices and “internet of things” sensors.

The number of chips containing ARM processors reached almost 15 billion in 2015, up from about 6 billion in 2010.

The move is a big one for SoftBank CEO Masa Son after his would-be successor, former Google executive Nikesh Arora, stepped away from the company last month. (Talks presumably started while Arora was still there.)

One key question is whether other firms will let SoftBank purchase ARM or if there will be a bidding war. Apple, arguably ARM’s most important client, and Intel, which lost the mobile chip war to ARM, are both potential buyers.

The offer is already a generous multiple. As the FT notes, it’s some 70 times ARM’s net income last year. That’s around the same price-to-earnings ratio as Facebook stock.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

ARM takeover by SoftBank is the Tech Brexit of this summer.

This thunderstrike in a blue ocean (pardon me, sky) might trigger a war where we will all of a sudden remember how important it is having a war chest.

There are underlying geopolitics ongoing as evidenced by the progress made by the LongSoon chinese processor now powering world #1 Supercomputer.

It might also signal the beginning of the end of the ARM era, and should have more people focusing on open source silicon architectures such as RISC-V

more...
Philippe J DEWOST's curator insight, July 18, 2016 3:58 AM

As Brexit has removed ARM from Europe, will it be left as the impotent witness of what we shall call an ARM's race ?

This news echoes the announcement of World's new #1 Supercomputer, that is chinese again, but more interestingly no longer features any Intel processor inside but domestic LongSoon chips.

The Silicon race is on its way to a US - Asia bipolar configuration, with Europe being left alone due to the combined effect of Brexit and ARMXit : time for investi(gati)ng (in) open source hardware architectures such as RISC-V ...

Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Apple R&D Reveals a Pivot Is Coming

Apple R&D Reveals a Pivot Is Coming | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

People are focusing on the wrong thing when analyzing Apple's path forward in the face of slowing iPhone sales. Instead of debating how much Apple will try to monetize the iPhone user base with services (not as much as consensus thinks), the company is instead planning its largest pivot yet. There are only a handful of logical explanations for Apple's current R&D expense trajectory, and all of them result in a radically different Apple. In a few years, we are no longer going to refer to Apple as the iPhone company. 

As I pointed out last May, Apple's R&D expense saw a significant bump up beginning in mid-2014. It was clear Apple was up to something big. However, after looking at Apple's 2Q16 results, it appears I underestimated the situation. As depicted in Exhibit 1, Apple is now on track to spend more than $10 billion on R&D in 2016, up nearly 30% from 2015 and ahead of even my aggressive estimate. This is a remarkable feat considering that Apple was spending a little over $3 billion per year on R&D just four years ago.

One of the more interesting aspects of Apple's R&D expense trajectory in recent years is that the increase has been outpacing revenue growth. As seen in Exhibit 2, given my current iPhone sales expectations for FY16 and FY17, Apple is on track to approach a multi-decade record in terms of amount spent on R&D as a percent of revenue. 

Unusual R&D Perceptions

The most shocking aspect about the amount of money Apple is spending on R&D is how little attention it has garnered in Silicon Valley and on Wall Street. Other than my R&D post last year, there is rarely any mention of Apple's R&D, and this doesn't seem to make much sense.

I suspect most of this has been due to the fact that Apple does not draw attention to its product pipeline and long-term strategy, choosing instead to embrace secrecy and mystery. Now compare this to Mark Zuckerberg laying out his 10-year plan for Facebook. It is easy and natural for people to then label Facebook as innovative and focused on the future. The same principle applies to Larry Page reorganizing Google to make it easier for investors to see how much is being spent on various moonshot projects. Jeff Bezos is famous for his attitude towards failing often and in public view, giving Amazon an aura of being a place of curiosity and boldness when it comes to future projects and risk taking. 

Meanwhile, Tim Cook has remained very tight-lipped about Apple's future, which gives the impression that Apple isn't working on ground-breaking ideas or products that can move the company beyond the iPhone. Instead of labeling this as a mistake or misstep, Apple's product secrecy is a key ingredient of its success. People like to be surprised. Another reason Apple takes a much different approach to product secrecy and R&D is its business model. Being open about future product plans will likely have a negative impact on near-term Apple hardware sales. Companies like Facebook and Google don't suffer from a similar risk. The end result is that there is a legitimate disconnect between Apple's R&D trends and the consensus view of the company's product pipeline. Apple is telling us that they are working on something very big, and yet no one seems to notice or care. I find that intriguing.

Logical Explanations for Apple R&D

Even though Apple remains tight-lipped about its dramatic increase in R&D expense, there are three logical explanations for what may be happening.

1) Apple's expanded product line requires additional R&D. This theory represents the most straightforward explanation. Essentially, because Apple has grown significantly over the years, the company needs to spend more on R&D just to keep up with its more expansive product line and greater competition. The company is now invested in four hardware categories (iPhone, iPad, Mac and Apple Watch), not to mention various software and services initiatives. 

2) Apple plans on doing more. Keeping with another simple explanation, Apple's increased R&D spend could signal that the company is willing to try its hand at more things. The expectation would be that Apple will begin releasing a greater number of products in terms of hardware, software and services. 

3) Apple is looking to pivot. Apple is ramping up R&D because they have a few big bets that require a massive increase in investment. The two most logical areas for these bets are wearables and personal transport initiatives. In both cases, Apple is moving well beyond its comfort zone of selling pieces of glass that can be held in one's hand. Instead, Apple is literally building a new company with additional capabilities and strengths.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Drowning by Numbers ; Apple might be surprising us again by opening entirely new product / service categories and they have the resources for doing so.

more...
Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, May 15, 2016 2:12 PM

Apple Pivot, Will We Care
Agree. Apple is looking for another disruption not looking to milk iPhone / iPad sales. And this is an understatement:

"I suspect most of this has been due to the fact that Apple does not draw attention to its product pipeline and long-term strategy, choosing instead to embrace secrecy and mystery. "

Open vs. Closed
The bigger question, for us, is the OPEN vs. CLOSED question. Apple hasn't made friends in the developer community. Sure we bend, scrape, plead and cry to have apps accepted, but the taste left with us is sour and painful. 

Android is trying to tighten standards having played, "Come One, Come All" a tad too loudly, but Apple is fickle and a pain. Yes it is good to be KING, but no one is KING of anything lasting that doesn't also inspire loyalty, trust and love. 

Most of the developers I know, even the ones who are rich thanks to Apple's app store, don't look forward to wrestling with Apple again. Some have achieved "trusted" status now, but they remember the blood and tears it took to get there. 

So note to Google, never tighten to the point where your tightening feels or seems capricious and mean. Apple has seemed capricious and mean to several developer friends who requested to remain nameless. Were they scared Apple might make a horrible process even harder? You bet. 

Apple is testimony to the power of "insanely great". NO ONE jumps through the seemingly arbitrary hoops Apple is known for unless "insanely great" is attached. I'm a huge Apple fan and have been since buying the Apple II back in the day. 

Lately I've caught myself wondering if the OVER (what I gain by being an Apple supporter) is worth the UNDER (what it takes to remain loyal). That is a conversation NO BRAND wants their customers to begin EVER since all the negative things leaving brings follows. 

The watch left me cold. I rarely wear watches anymore, but when I do I want something from MoMA and their tiny phone on your wrist looked more Dick Tracy than cool watch (to me). I'm wearing a watch to dinner tonight and it won't be an Apple Watch. 

My updated AIR is nothing but a pain. It doesn't fit my hands, the keyword is impossible to tune, and the screen too small. I never use it preferring my old Air (from 6 years ago). I love my iMac with the huge screen (what I'm writing on now), but it too was a failure. 

We tried moving my 83-year-old father over to the big Mac screen but accessibility features were a torture and he is a Windows guy and will remain one. My Macbook I like, but it is getting long in the tooth and clunky. My iPad Pro I LOVE and that is taking the place of the new AIR (that I hate) and my MacBook. 

Long diatribe, but I share my journey as a note of growing Apple frustration. My new EXPENSIVE Air was a disaster I should have sent back, but I kept thinking it was me. I don't think that way anymore and that can't be good for Apple. 

Juan Ortega's curator insight, May 20, 2016 4:34 AM
Historia de Apple con número de unidades vendidas de cada producto
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

17 charts that show just how scary Amazon's $275 billion business really is

17 charts that show just how scary Amazon's $275 billion business really is | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Most people think of Amazon as an online shopping store, but it's actually much more than that.

Over the past 22 years, Amazon has turned itself into a $275 billion juggernaut that sells everything from cloud-computing services to its own hardware gadgets.

It will even be making approx $10 Bn in revenue this year from its cloud computing enterprise services.

These 17 charts show just how scary its business really is.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Which of these charts is the most surprising / amazing to you ?

(I picked and display #13 as the growth of AWS is to me absolutely astounding and beyond imaginable proportions)

more...
Agrupa Consultores's curator insight, March 31, 2016 3:23 AM

Which of these charts is the most surprising / amazing to you ?

(I picked and display #13 as the growth of AWS is to me absolutely astounding and beyond imaginable proportions)

Daphne L Kinzig's curator insight, March 31, 2016 1:17 PM
Considering the way I purchase from Amazon, it's no surprise how big the company has grown.  It is my go to for most everything if I can wait two days for prime shipping.    Cloud computing growth - interesting...

Considering the way I purchase from Amazon, it's no surprise how big the company has grown.  It is my go to for most everything if I can wait two days for prime shipping but must be most economical as well.   Cloud computing growth - interesting & amazing! 

 
Daphne L Kinzig's curator insight, March 31, 2016 1:21 PM
Considering the way I purchase from Amazon, it's no surprise how big the company has grown.  It is my go to for most everything if I can wait two days for prime shipping.    Cloud computing growth - interesting...

Considering the way I purchase from Amazon, it's no surprise how big the company has grown.  It is my go to for most everything if I can wait two days for prime shipping but must be most economical as well.   Cloud computing growth - interesting & amazing! 

 
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Devialet wants its sound tech in everything you use

Devialet wants its sound tech in everything you use | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

While the Phantom is a product that’s actually for sale in places such as the Apple store, its real purpose is to showcase Devialet’s audio technologies. In a recent interview, Devialet CEO Quentin Sannié explained that the company’s ultimate goal is to get its technology into everything from phones, to cars, to television sets — really, anything that outputs audio.

The Phantom is a showcase for two of Devialet’s developments: a software-based technology called Speaker Active Matching (SAM) and a hardware-based amplification system that combines an analog amp with a digital one. Sannié says that the SAM algorithm could be implemented into any digital signal processor, even the one in your phone, and can improve the sound quality of hundreds of devices. The algorithm is developed by measuring the behavior of each speaker and then creating a mathematical model to control how the speaker behaves. This measurement process can be done in about 10 minutes using special, laser-based tools the company developed for it.

The Phantom is a showcase for Devialet's technologies

Sannié says that a system using SAM can reproduce lower frequencies without changing its hardware at all, and it can even enable noise-cancellation without the need for a subwoofer. It’s part of the reason that the Phantom’s relatively small drivers move so quickly when the volume is cranked up and have little to no distortion. Sannié claims that SAM could even be used by a streaming service to optimize audio before it’s even delivered to a listener. A user could tell the service what kind of speakers or headphones they are using and the sound would be tailored just for them.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Devialet Chief Maestro details his grand music sheet in this interesting feature. La French Tech has a voice !

more...
George Goodman's curator insight, March 14, 2016 12:50 PM

Devialet Chief Maestro details his grand music sheet in this interesting feature. La French Tech has a voice !

Ty Garibay's curator insight, March 14, 2016 8:10 PM

Devialet Chief Maestro details his grand music sheet in this interesting feature. La French Tech has a voice !

Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Alphabet's Google reports rising profits in core Businesses

Alphabet's Google reports rising profits in core Businesses | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
Google's parent company - has surpassed Apple as the world's most valuable company after its latest earnings report.
Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

With @Trooclick you can see a summary of what 45 speakers said about @Alphabet passing @Apple in market cap... for now.

My preferred comment is "Essentially, what they have now is a big advertising business and a venture capital business." by Forrester's Frank Gillett ; and yours ?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Apple = Microsoft + Google when it comes to profits

Apple = Microsoft + Google when it comes to profits | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Apple had the highest annual profit of any company in history for its fiscal year, which ended September 30. Can anybody else catch up?

Probably not anytime soon. This chart from Statista shows how far ahead Apple is compared with the rest of the tech industry. Apple's quarterly profit was more than the combined profits of Microsoft and Alphabet (Google). No other tech company came close.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

$10 Bn$ as a quarterly unit sounds a little unreal.

more...
http://www.fiverr.com/donnesuccess's curator insight, November 10, 2015 8:38 AM

UNLIMITED HUMAN-TRAFFIC TO SITE-LINK-VIDEO


Click: http://goo.gl/SrPGJe

#SOLOADS #ARTICLE

Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Apple is losing the tablet market it created with the iPad

Apple is losing the tablet market it created with the iPad | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
Global tablet shipments are rising, but a new report from Strategy Analytics says Apple's tablet market share continues to slip, despite its utter dominance just a few years ago. Based on Strategy Analytics data charted for us by BI Intelligence, the iPad's global market share dropped 20%, from a 32.6% share in 2013 to 26.1% in 2014.

Strategy Analytics says the leading tablet makers can no longer "rely on inertia alone" as other smaller players are beginning to offer cheaper tablets with competitive features. But Apple CEO Tim Cook is still confident in the iPad, especially in businesses: Last month, he said the company's partnership with IBM could help "move the dial" with sales, and the rumored 12-inch iPad could certainly improve Apple's tablet market share, especially if it offers businesspeople more features for advanced productivity.
Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Apple may be losing the tablet market in volume, but how would this #ChartOfTheDay look like in value ?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

A Snapshot Of Apple's Monster September Quarter

A Snapshot Of Apple's Monster September Quarter | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

As you can see from the chart below, which was provided for us by BI Intelligence, Apple's $42.12 billion in revenue is a big 12% jump from the same quarter a year ago. It was Apple's best September quarter ever — thanks in large part to the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, which continue selling like hotcakes; the iPhone in general accounted for 56% of the company's revenue this quarter. But the real surprise is the Mac, which had its best quarter in Apple's history with 5.52 million unit sales; the Mac accounted for more of Apple's revenue than the iPad (16% versus 13%, respectively). Apple expects an even bigger December quarter, projecting $63.5 billion to $66.6 billion in revenue for the holiday season — that would make it the company's most successful quarter in history.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Who said that the Mac is dead ?

more...
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Apple to Hold iPad + iMac + Yosemite Event on Oct 16

Apple to Hold iPad + iMac + Yosemite Event on Oct 16 | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Apple has a few more new products to unveil before the year is out, and it plans to show them off in a couple weeks. Sources tell Code/red the company will hold its next special event on Thursday, Oct. 16 — not the 21st. Headlining the gathering: The latest updates to its iPad line, along with those new iMacs that 9to5Mac told us about earlier this week. Also: OS X Yosemite.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Touch ID hopefully (and finally) coming to iPad product line while Retina screens expected to debut in iMacs ?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Apple's enterprise mobility deal with IBM could pressure BlackBerry, Google

Under Apple and IBM's "landmark" teaming, the former rivals will collaborate on creating mobile applications for specific enterprise solutions. IBM will also sell iPhones and iPads to its business customers.

The deal reflects Apple's desire to get its iOS software more deeply embedded in the enterprise segment as well as IBM's push into the mobile market. The deal will include the creation of more than 100 industry-specific enterprise solutions including native apps developed for the iPhone and iPad; IBM cloud services optimized for iOS, including device management, security, analytics and mobile integration; new AppleCare service and support for enterprise users; and new packaged offerings from IBM for device activation, supply and management.

 

Apple CEO Tim Cook and IBM CEO Ginni Rometty said the deal reflects their unique capabilities. "If you were building a puzzle, they would fit nicely together with no overlap," Cook said of the relationship in an interview with Re/code. "We do not compete on anything. And when you do that you end up with something better than either of you could produce yourself."

 

Rometty said Apple is the "gold standard for consumers," and said the partnership will allow the companies to help address the challenges affecting large companies. "We will get to remake professions and unlock value that companies don't yet have," she said. "We're addressing serious issues that before this had been inhibiting deployment of wireless in the enterprise."

 

Analysts said the deal now makes IBM and Apple more central players in the enterprise mobility market. "They're now strongly associated with the premium mobile platform and mobile devices," Forrester Research Frank Gillet told Bloomberg. "If you want to do anything interesting in the enterprise, you now have to check with IBM on what they're doing with Apple."

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

It is not the first time Apple tries to cooperate with IBM. In the 1990s there was Kaleida, Taligent, and of course the PowerPC architecture. Will it be more successful this time as they seem not to compete in any area ?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Philippe J DEWOST
Scoop.it!

Apple earnings conf call detailed. Some huge surprises inside.

Apple earnings conf call detailed. Some huge surprises inside. | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Just when the world was ready to bury Apple, the company delivered a strong beat on revenue, earnings per share, and, perhaps most important, iPhone sales.

Let's get right to the big numbers everyone cares about:

Revenue: $45.6 billion, up 4% year over year, versus $43.6 billion expected by analysts.EPS: $11.62, up 15% year over year, versus $10.16 expected by analysts.iPhones: 43.7 million, up 17% year over year, versus 37.7 million expected by analysts.iPhone ASP: $596 versus $610 expected by analysts.iPads: 16.35 million, down 16% year over year, versus 19.7 million units expected by analysts.iPad ASP: $465 versus $430 expected by analysts.Macs: 4.1 million versus 4.03 million expected by analysts.iPods: 2.76 million versus 2.99 million expected by analysts.Gross Margin: 39.3% versus 37.7% expected by analysts.Q3 Revenue: $36 billion to $38 billion versus $38.1 billion expected by analysts.

Apple also announced a 7-for-1 stock split, and an increase in its buyback program and dividend.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Even regarding the iPad hitting a (hard) wall : "He said it's the fastest-growing product in Apple's history. Apple has sold 210 million iPads since launch, which is almost double the iPhone at the same point in its life. He also said that it's seven times what the iPod was at this point in its life. He said customer satisfaction was 98, which is unheard of. He said it's 95% of the U.S. education market. It's in virtually all of the Fortune 500 companies. He says engagement is off the charts and well ahead of Android.

And so, if you look at the iPad from that perspective, it's still a strong, healthy business and it has a bright future, says Cook. He still thinks the tablet will surpass the PC in the coming years, and he thinks Apple is positioned to benefit."

more...
No comment yet.