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17 charts that show just how scary Amazon's $275 billion business really is

17 charts that show just how scary Amazon's $275 billion business really is | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Most people think of Amazon as an online shopping store, but it's actually much more than that.

Over the past 22 years, Amazon has turned itself into a $275 billion juggernaut that sells everything from cloud-computing services to its own hardware gadgets.

It will even be making approx $10 Bn in revenue this year from its cloud computing enterprise services.

These 17 charts show just how scary its business really is.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Which of these charts is the most surprising / amazing to you ?

(I picked and display #13 as the growth of AWS is to me absolutely astounding and beyond imaginable proportions)

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Agrupa Consultores's curator insight, March 31, 3:23 AM

Which of these charts is the most surprising / amazing to you ?

(I picked and display #13 as the growth of AWS is to me absolutely astounding and beyond imaginable proportions)

Daphne L Kinzig's curator insight, March 31, 1:17 PM
Considering the way I purchase from Amazon, it's no surprise how big the company has grown.  It is my go to for most everything if I can wait two days for prime shipping.    Cloud computing growth - interesting...

Considering the way I purchase from Amazon, it's no surprise how big the company has grown.  It is my go to for most everything if I can wait two days for prime shipping but must be most economical as well.   Cloud computing growth - interesting & amazing! 

 
Daphne L Kinzig's curator insight, March 31, 1:21 PM
Considering the way I purchase from Amazon, it's no surprise how big the company has grown.  It is my go to for most everything if I can wait two days for prime shipping.    Cloud computing growth - interesting...

Considering the way I purchase from Amazon, it's no surprise how big the company has grown.  It is my go to for most everything if I can wait two days for prime shipping but must be most economical as well.   Cloud computing growth - interesting & amazing! 

 
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Of Amazon's Cloud Monopoly by I, Cringely

Of Amazon's Cloud Monopoly by I, Cringely | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Amazon has monopoly power over the public cloud because it clearly sets the price (ever downward) and has the capacity to enforce that price. Amazon is the OPEC of cloud computing and both studies actually show that because both show Amazon gaining share in a market that is simply exploding.

The way you gain share in an exploding market is by exploding more than all the other guys and we can see that at work by comparing IBM’s statement that it would (notice they are speaking about future events) invest $1 billion in cloud infrastructure in the current fiscal year, versus Amazon’s statement that it had (notice they are speaking of events that had already happened) spent $5 billion on cloud infrastructure in the past fiscal year. 

Maybe $1 billion against definitely $5 billion isn’t even a contest. At this rate Amazon’s cloud will continue to grow faster than IBM’s cloud.

Wait, there’s more! Only Amazon can really claim they have a graphical cloud. While not all Amazon servers are equipped with GPUs, enough of them are to support millions of simultaneous seats running graphical apps. No other cloud vendor can claim that.

Having a graphical cloud is important because it is one of those computing milestones we see come along every decade or so to determine who are the real leaders. Think about it. There were mainframes with punched cards (batch systems) then with terminals (interactive systems), then interactive minicomputers, then personal workstations and computers, then graphical computers, mobile computers, networked computers, Internet computers and now cloud computers. Each step established a new hierarchy of vendors and service providers. And it is clear to me that right here, right now Amazon is absolutely dominant in both cloud and graphical cloud computing. They set the price, they set the terms, they have the capacity, and everyone else just plays along or goes out of business.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Stop 1 second thinking of Amazon from the user / developer point of view and reflect about this :

"But there is an important question here and that’s at what point Amazon will be in a position to use lethal cloud force? It’s a market doubling or more in size every year. How many more doubles will it take for Amazon to gain such lethal business power? I’d say five more years will do it.

And when I say do it, think about the company we are talking about. Amazon is unique. No large company in the industry right now has a more effective CEO than Jeff Bezos. No large company has a bigger appetite for calculated risk than does Amazon. No company is more disciplined. And — most importantly — no large company has the ear of Wall Street the way Bezos and Amazon do. They can try and fail in any number of areas (mobile phones, anyone?) and not be punished for it in the market. And in this case that’s because the market is smart, relying on Bezos’ innate ruthlessness."

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youngcelery's comment, November 6, 2015 11:16 PM
Its cool :)
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Amazon Web Services wants to run your world | ZDNet

Amazon Web Services wants to run your world | ZDNet | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

The rapid growth of cloud services like AWS will have a big impact on hardware, in particular on servers and other gear in data centers, but also on how we use PCs and mobile devices. Here are my takeaways from re:Invent.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

A very good wrapup of AWS re:Invent conference held last week in Vegas. And a must read if you want to seize the speed, depth, power and future of the online book store that happened to invent Cloud Computing.

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Talking the Cloud Business with Amazon CTO Werner Vogels

Talking the Cloud Business with Amazon CTO Werner Vogels | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

In its relatively short eight-year life-span, there’s a lot we’ve come to know — and yet a lot more that we don’t — about Amazon Web Services.

When it launched in 2006, the idea of renting computing capacity on a pay-as-you-go basis was a new one. Fast-growing startup companies who might have struggled to keep their systems running if they launched a popular new Web service could suddenly have all the capacity they needed in minutes instead of months. AWS fundamentally changed how companies think about their computing infrastructure needs.

And while Amazon won’t say exactly how big a business it is as a percentage of its $74.5 billion in annual revenue, there have been many educated guesses. A new one out yesterday from Pacific Crest Securities — and noticed by Bloomberg Businessweek — estimates it’s a $5 billion business annually and on its way to approaching $7 billion next year.

If that estimate is accurate, and if we thought of AWS as a separate company, its growth rate after passing the $1 billion revenue mark would be second only to that of Google, and would have exceeded that of Microsoft, Oracle and Salesforce.com.

Against this backdrop, Re/code sat down recently with Amazon CTO Werner Vogels while he was visiting New York. Werner, along with Andy Jassy, is among the executives continuing the shakeup that AWS started in the enterprise IT world.

Another data point from the Businessweek story: If Amazon sold traditional hardware servers, it would rank number four by revenue behind Dell, IBM and Hewlett-Packard. In response at least two of those companies, IBM and HP have built up their own cloud computing services to try to take on Amazon.

IBM has been the most vocal about its response in recent months. Last year it spent $2 billion to acquire SoftLayer. It has since pledged to spend big to build out its data center footprint and is running most of its software applications. This week Big Blue said its combined public cloud services and cloud software business is on track to book $7 billion in revenue next year, which make it about as big as Amazon, though it’s an apples-to-oranges comparison.

When we spoke, Amazon had just announced Zocalo, a new document-sharing and collaboration service meant to complement its WorkSpace virtual desktop product and to compete with similar offerings from DropBox (notably an AWS customer) and IPO-bound Box.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Amazon's cloud business may be 2nd fastest software company after Google, as - per @Werner - they are "in the business of pain management for enterprises."

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Amazon teleports 'AWS Connector for vCenter' into rival VMware data centers

Amazon teleports 'AWS Connector for vCenter' into rival VMware data centers | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Amazon announced on Friday afternoon that it was making available an "AWS Connector for vCenter", which lets admins import management tools for Amazon's cloud directly into an on-premise data center software package made by one of Amazon's rivals.

The AWS Connector for vCenter tech gives VMware administrators a way to buy, manage, and migrate VMs into AWS cloud resources from within VMware's vCenter management console.

vCenter is a widely used piece of software from VMware that lets admins manage large numbers of virtual machines, typically within enterprise data centers.

"If you are already using VMware vCenter to manage your virtualized environment, you will be comfortable in this new environment right away, even if you are new to AWS, starting with the integrated sign-on process, which is integrated with your existing Active Directory," Amazon explains.

"The look-and-feel and the workflow that you use to create new AWS resources will be familiar," they continue, "and you will be launching EC2 instances before too long. You can even import your existing 'golden' VMware images to EC2 through the portal (this feature makes use of VM Import)."

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Trojan Horse 2.0 . This is the beauty of APIs...

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Microsoft Joins Amazon and Google in Cloud Price War

Microsoft Joins Amazon and Google in Cloud Price War | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Microsoft slashed prices on several of its cloud computing services the company announced on Monday, following through on a standing promise to match Amazon Web Services, which made similar cuts last week.

The software giant made the announcement in a blog post by Windows Azure general manager Steven Martin, saying it will slash prices on various services by 27 percent to 65 percent. “We recognize that economics are a primary driver for some customers adopting cloud, and stand by our commitment to match prices and be best-in-class on price performance,” Martin wrote. The move coincided with Microsoft’s Build conference taking place this week in San Francisco.

It’s the latest move in what’s turning out to be a brisk price war for cloud computing services. Last week, Amazon announced a broad-based price cut on many portions of its Amazon Web Services by 36 percent to 65 percent. That came a day after Google slashed prices for its Google Cloud Platform from 32 percent to 85 percent.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

This is still very foggy : would this mean they have been "overcharging customers from Day 1" as DigitalOcean complains ?

Inbetween, one clear spot in the sky is the confirmed rise of OpenStack. It may soon be followed by an industrial, hardware based revolution with Open Compute yet this is another story... yet.

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Emmanuel HAVET's curator insight, April 2, 2014 3:52 AM

I agree with Philippe Dewost :

" one clear spot in the sky is the confirmed rise of OpenStack. It may soon be followed by an industrial, hardware based revolution with Open Compute yet this is another story... yet."

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Tablet Market Share By Platform Infographic Reveals Android Rise - Yet iPad Still Rules in Usage Share

Tablet Market Share By Platform Infographic Reveals Android Rise - Yet iPad Still Rules in Usage Share | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

The iPad family accounted for 81% of tablet use in the U.S. and Canada during April, up slightly from a few months ago. Kindle Fires accounted for the second largest share, followed by Samsung Galaxy tablets. In other words, even though Android took its first lead in global tablet market share last quarter (see chart, right), that's not showing up in North American usage patterns. It's likely that Android tablets are filling out the low-end of the tablet market in the emerging world.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Usage reality field distorsion? looks also like Windows8 is catching up on Kindle...

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Amazon in talks to buy Texas Instruments’ smartphone & tablet OMAP chip activity: Report

Amazon in talks to buy Texas Instruments’ smartphone & tablet OMAP chip activity: Report | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
Texas Instruments (TI), which recently announced that it will wind down its operations in smartphone and tablet oriented OMAP chips and instead focus on embedded platforms, is engaged in ‘advanced negotiations’ to sell that particular line of business to one of its largest customers: Amazon.com.

Such a deal would be worth ‘billions of dollars’.

The news was reported by Assaf Gilad from Calcalist.co.il (in Hebrew), but hasn’t been confirmed by either company at this point. Gilad has a track record of getting stories like this exactly right, by the way. He was first to report Apple’s interest in Israeli fabless semiconductor company and flash storage solutions provider Anobit, for example, and we know what happened next.

According to the report, Amazon.com is looking to acquire TI’s high-end processor activity so it can exert more control over the chips running its Kindle Fire tablets and the accompanying smartphones it probably has in the works.
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Interest In Amazon's Kindle Fire Collapses

Interest In Amazon's Kindle Fire Collapses | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Apple has only had one tablet that could legitimately be considered a rival: The Kindle Fire.

When it launched, there was great buzz about the product and the price. Well, seven months later, the interest in the Fire is gone.

ChangeWave research released its most recent data on interest in the Kindle Fire, and as you can see, just 8% of people polled say they will buy one in the next three months. That's down from 22% when the Fire launched. The iPad, meanwhile, is at 73%.

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CHART OF THE DAY: Apple's Growth In Context

CHART OF THE DAY: Apple's Growth In Context | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
How impressive was Apple's most recent quarter? These two charts should help.

Take a look at Apple's revenue growth compared to the four most important companies in the tech space. Its growth blows them all away.

And Apple generates almost as much revenue as Amazon, Microsoft, Google, and Facebook combined. Apple was at $39.2 billion, the other guys combined are at $40.4 billion.

Below that we have Apple's profit growth. Apple's profits were up 94%. Google's were up 60%. Everyone else was down on a year on a year over year basis.

And, Apple's profits of $11.6 billion are bigger than everyone else's profits combined, which came in at $8.33 billion.
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Google and Facebook Team Up to Open Source the Gear Behind Their Empires

Google and Facebook Team Up to Open Source the Gear Behind Their Empires | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Half a decade ago, Jonathan Heiliger compared the world of Internet data centers to Fight Club.

It was the spring of 2011, and the giants of the Internet—including Google, Amazon, and Microsoft—were erecting a new kind of data center. Their online empires had grown so large that they could no longer rely on typical hardware from the likes of Dell, HP, and IBM. They needed hardware that was cheaper, more streamlined, and more malleable. So, behind the scenes, they designed this hardware from scratch and had it manufactured through little-known companies in Asia.

This shadow hardware market was rarely discussed in public. Companies like Google saw their latest data center hardware as a competitive advantage best kept secret from rivals. But then Facebook tore off the veil. It open sourced its latest server and data center designs, freely sharing them with the world under the aegis of a new organization called the Open Compute Project. “It’s time to stop treating data center design like Fight Club and demystify the way these things are built,” said Heiliger, then the vice president of technical operations at Facebook. 

Google was the first company to rethink data center design for the modern age.

With the Open Compute Project, Facebook aimed to create a whole community of companies that would freely share their data center designs, hoping to accelerate the evolution of Internet hardware and, thanks to the economies of scale, drive down the cost of this hardware. That, among other things, boosts the Facebook bottom line. It worked—in a very big way. Microsoft soon shared its designs too. Companies like HP and Quanta began selling this new breed of streamlined gear. And businesses as diverse as Rackspace and Goldman Sachs used this hardware to expand their own massive online operations. Even Apple—that bastion of secrecy—eventually joined the project.

Two big holdouts remained: Google and Amazon. But today, that number dropped to one. At the annual Open Compute Summit in San Jose, California, Google announced that it too has joined the project. And it’s already working with Facebook on a new piece of open source hardware.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Open Compute has been transformative since day 1, and with Google finally joining, the number of missing elephants in the room has dramatically reduced.

What still puzzles me is the loud silence of European players in the field although we have a tremendous breed of companies and talent in that space. #HardwareIsNotDead

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Gerald Black's curator insight, March 10, 9:27 AM

Open Compute has been transformative since day 1, and with Google finally joining, the number of missing elephants in the room has dramatically reduced.

What still puzzles me is the loud silence of European players in the field although we have a tremendous breed of companies and talent in that space. #HardwareIsNotDead

George Goodman's curator insight, March 10, 10:09 AM

Open Compute has been transformative since day 1, and with Google finally joining, the number of missing elephants in the room has dramatically reduced.

What still puzzles me is the loud silence of European players in the field although we have a tremendous breed of companies and talent in that space. #HardwareIsNotDead

Agra hotal's curator insight, March 10, 11:27 AM

Book Now Hotel with cheap rate near Tajmahal on http://www.hotelatagra.com

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Amazon undercuts Google's cloud prices - providing you can pay up front

Amazon undercuts Google's cloud prices - providing you can pay up front | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Amazon has introduced a way to pay for cloud infrastructure that undercuts Google – provided you're willing to shell out up front towards at least one year of use.

Amazon Web Services (AWS) has changed the way it charges for its Reserved Instance (RI) compute infrastructure on its Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). EC2 customers pay for Reserved Instance infrastructure whether they use it or not, unlike EC2's On Demand Instances.

The charges for Reserved Instances are no longer split into light, medium and heavy usage but instead reflect how much a user is willing to pay up front.

Users can chose to pay no up-front costs, or some or all of the costs up front, and must commit to paying for one or three years of usage. A table produced by the cloud portfolio management company RightScale summarises the available payment options below.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Cash is king and Amazon as a Bank

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Nobody Can Win The Cloud Pricing Wars

Nobody Can Win The Cloud Pricing Wars | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Earlier this week, Google lowered prices 10 percent across the board on their Google Compute Engine cloud platform . The cost is getting so low, it’s almost trivial for anyone to absorb the costs of running infrastructure in the cloud, but you have to wonder as the cloud pricing wars continue, how low can they go and if it’s a war anyone can win.

 

The end game is obviously zero, but these companies have overhead and while the Big Three cloud computing companies –Google, Amazon and Microsoft –run their Infrastructure as a Service as a side business, chances are their stock holders don’t want to see them giving it away for nothing, a point we seem to be approaching quickly.

 

Just this week, Oracle shocked the world (or at least me) when it announced it would lower its Database as a Service pricing to match Amazon’s. This is Oracle we’re talking about, a company known for its high prices joining the pricing wars. It’s one thing for the Big Three to engage in this type of activity, but for a traditional enterprise software (and hardware) company used to high profits, it’s startling.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Time to (re)assess the real value of sovereignty ?

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How Facebook Moved 20 Billion Instagram Photos Without Anybody Noticing

How Facebook Moved 20 Billion Instagram Photos Without Anybody Noticing | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

This spring, even as some 200 million people were using Instagram on their smartphones, a small team of engineers moved the photo sharing service from Amazon’s cloud computing service—where it was built in 2010—into a data center operated by Facebook, which bought Instagram in 2012. “The users are still in the same car they were in at the beginning of the journey,” says Instagram founder Mike Krieger, “but we’ve swapped out every single part without them noticing.”

Facebook calls it the “Instagration,” and it was an unprecedented undertaking for Mark Zuckerberg and company. Facebook has moved other acquired properties like FriendFeed into its data centers, but typically, they were small projects that involved shutting a service down before moving it into the Facebook universe. The Instagram switch was the live migration of an enormous—and enormously popular—operation. “The service couldn’t take any disruption,” says Facebook engineer George Cabrera. Facebook won’t say how many virtual machines were needed to run Instagram on Amazon, but it was in “the thousands.” And the service now stores over 20 billion digitals photos.

 

For Instagram, the move was a way of more effectively plugging into a wide range of computing tools that have long helped drive Facebook’s vast online empire. And for the engineers overseeing Facebook’s worldwide network of data centers, it’s a template for merging their operation with applications the company may acquire in the years to come. “We were patient zero,” Krieger says. But the “Instagration” also provides a lesson or two for the broader tech community as it builds more and more apps atop cloud computing services like Amazon—apps they might one day migrate to private data centers. The key to the migration was a specialized Amazon service known as the Virtual Private Cloud.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

fascinating article about #Instagration — "The users are still in the same car they were in at the beginning of the journey, but we’ve swapped out every single part without them noticing." 

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Amazon joins other web giants trying to design its own chips

Amazon joins other web giants trying to design its own chips | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

As demand for its cloud computing services continues to grow, sources say Amazon is trying to design its own server chips. Based on a job listing and a series of LinkedIn updates, it looks like it could be eyeing the ARM architecture for those chips.

The online retailer and cloud giant has hired several chip engineers who used to work at Calxeda, the former ARM-based server startup out of Austin, Texas that shut down last year, including the former Calxeda CTO. It also has a few job listings for its Silicon Optimization team based in Austin, Texas that call for microprocessor design expertise, including one for a “CPU Architect / Micro-Architect.”

Amazon declined to comment on its plans; actually, a spokeswoman said, “We don’t comment on rumors or speculation.” Don’t worry, we’ll make sure to ask Amazon’s CTO Werner Vogels (pictured) about these plans at our Structure event in June. However, several sources in the Austin chip community have been discussing the impact of Amazon’s decision to swoop in and recruit engineers after Calxeda shut down in December, curious about whether or not Amazon planned to follow other webscale businesses Google and Facebook in trying to build their own silicon.

 
Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Hardware is not dead... Entering the hardware race yet requires muscles and above all talent. And as I pointed as early as 2 years ago, ARM is still an interesting option.

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Visualizing 15 Years Of Acquisitions By Apple, Google, Yahoo, Amazon, And Facebook

Visualizing 15 Years Of Acquisitions By Apple, Google, Yahoo, Amazon, And Facebook | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

You grow old, you slow down, and you die. That is, unless you can inject some fresh blood. After watching the last generation of tech giants wither or..

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Proud to be somewhere in this GAFAY shopping spree. This chart would be even more interesting in % of market cap...

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Barnes & Noble Puts Google’s Play Store and Apps on the Nook

Barnes & Noble Puts Google’s Play Store and Apps on the Nook | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

The walls around Barnes & Noble‘s Nook walled garden are tumbling down.

 

The company’s Nook HD and Nook HD+ are credible content-consumption tablets — remarkably credible, actually, considering that they come from a 127-year-old bookseller. But they sold so poorly over the holiday season that it raised questions about whether B&N would end up being forced to de-emphasize its hardware business in favor of selling content on other platforms.

The Nooks use Barnes & Noble’s own custom version of Android and provide its own stores for books, magazines, newspapers and apps. And therein lies an oft-raised argument against buying a Nook: the Barnes & Noble application store has had only 10,000 pieces of software — mostly for-pay ones — vs. the hundreds of thousands of choices in Google’s Google Play.


So with one fell swoop, in the form of a software update being rolled out today, B&N is eliminating that downside. It’s giving both Nooks the Google Play stores for apps, music, movies and books, plus key Google apps which the tablets have lacked until now: Chrome, Gmail and YouTube. (Google’s policies for its apps are an all-or-nothing proposition for device makers — if they want Google Play, they also have to pre-install Google’s apps.) New Nooks sold at Barnes & Noble’s bookstores and elsewhere will also carry the updated software.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Slightly tricky as this brings to market a dirt cheap great Android tablet that can run the Kindle app and indirectly sponsored by MSFT...

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How Apple, Amazon & Google Make So Much Money

How Apple, Amazon & Google Make So Much Money | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Lots of chatter about "the Apple Tax" these days including @gassee 's excellent Monday Note; here is the other side of the Apple Tax...

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Decoding Share Prices: Amazon, Apple and Facebook

Decoding Share Prices: Amazon, Apple and Facebook | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
JLG writes: "There are many religions when it comes to calculating the “right” price for the shares of a publicly traded company. At a basic level, buying a share is an act of faith in the company’s future earnings. The strength of this belief manifests itself in the company’s P/E (Price/Earnings) ratio. The stronger the faith, the higher the P/E, an expectation of increased profit.
Sometimes, an extreme P/E number beggars belief, it invites a deeper look into the thoughts and emotions that drive prices.
.../...
I consider the stock market a dangerous place where, across the table, I see people with bigger brains, bigger computers, and bigger wallets than mine. I can’t win. The casino always does…unless you don’t trade but, instead, invest–that is buy shares and keep them for years, the way Warren Buffet does."
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