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Scality CEO says French startup scene is booming

Scality CEO says French startup scene is booming | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
The French startup ecosystem is booming. Its exponential growth started about 5 years ago, and now attracts more and more of the young talent. See this.France was not historically seen as a startup country, and it wasn't. But things have changed. It is now the second largest startup ecosystem in Europe (after UK, but ahead of Germany), and may be about to become the first.There are some amazing initiatives like Ecole 42, which just launched in Silicon Valley as well.It is becoming recognised in Silicon Valley. As an example, John Chambers has on numerous occasions mentioned that he saw huge potential in the French startup ecosystem; for example, in a Fortune article.I expect that we will see the spirit of startup go beyond tech, and enter other industries where France has real knowledge, like food and fashion.
Philippe J DEWOST's insight:
Great interview of Scality CEO by TheRegister. Jérôme Lecat has been a first hour supporter of La French Tech and very clearly explains how to articulate your startup between France and the US, debunking a few myths underway...
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Apple Watch: Why Let Facts Cloud The Debate?

Apple Watch: Why Let Facts Cloud The Debate? | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

The absence of official numbers for the Apple Watch leads to speculation that the device is a flop — why else would Apple hide the numbers? But the company’s penchant for secrecy shouldn’t prevent us from looking at a few facts, and from thinking about the company’s long game.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

You better Watch this enjoyable JL Gassée feature :-)

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Apple's $1 Billion Bet On Didi Chuxing, & 12 Big Questions About What's Next For Cars | F@stCompany

Apple's $1 Billion Bet On Didi Chuxing, & 12 Big Questions About What's Next For Cars | F@stCompany | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

How widely and how quickly will autonomous cars be accepted? As hard as it might be for an urbanite to imagine, many people love their cars. And if early autonomous vehicles cause a few well-publicized accidents, fear of the unknown could slow the trend, even to a halt.

Is owning a car factory an advantage or a disadvantage? In the minds of many from Silicon Valley, "Detroit" is a euphemism for inept. They believe the most important part of a car is its software, and they're probably right. But isn’t a century’s worth of expertise worth something? And don’t get carried away about Tesla: Last year it delivered 50,580 cars, approximately one-quarter of one percent of Detroit's output.

Is ride-sharing a commodity product? In Brooklyn, I can use a car-hailing app to get Uber, Lyft, Juno, or a taxi. I don’t see any significant difference between any of the services, each of which arrive quickly, charge similar fares, and offer clean cars and knowledgeable drivers. Selling a commodity tends to be a pretty awful business.

How long can ride-sharing companies like Uber and Lyft take a loss on many of the rides they provide, in their race to garner riders and drivers? "There’s never been a market as subsidized as this," one venture capitalist told me. "We’ll only know the winners and losers after that settles down."

Will governmental regulations slow or speed this transition? The environmental benefits of electric vehicles and fewer cars on the road are clear. Yet cities like New York, Austin, Berlin, and Paris have at different times threatened to strangle car-sharing with regulations. Look at the airline business: governments like regulating travel, for better or for worse.

What kind of "driver" or "passenger" insurance will be required? The average American driver now pays a bit less than $1000 per year for auto insurance. But who is responsible when driverless cars collide?

Will we continue to personally own cars, or will we instead have monthly subscriptions to companies that will provide all the rides we need? Subscription services seem likely, but if my current subscriptions—to companies like Time Warner Cable and Verizon—are any model, quality suffers and prices creep up.

Why is it so difficult to design a driver-friendly dashboard? Mapping services and accurate engine diagnostics are welcome additions to the information a driver can see, but more data has resulted in cluttered screens using interactive controls designed for phones or laptops. Steve Jobs understood that the user interface was the most important part of any consumer technology. Can Apple solve this problem?

Are Uber and Lyft drivers employees or contractors? This is an issue of short-term importance, but is caught up in a broader societal concern: How to define those who participate in the so-called ‘gig economy.’

Who has the most important leverage? The company that designs a car's software? The manufacturer? Or is it Uber, whose app is used by so many consumers? As with any nascent transition, it's hard to know what will emerge as the most important bottleneck.

Can any ride-sharing company become a truly international brand, or will local services trump those ambitions? Uber is losing billions of dollars trying to snare a leading market share in Asian countries. No one know exactly how much resistance it will face from governments that prefer local providers.

How strong are the network effects that Uber gains by being such a well-funded first mover? Benchmark VC Bill Gurley likes to point to this tweet as a key reason that Uber will continue to thrive. But if car-sharing has as much subsidization and government interference as the airline industry, will those network effects hold true?

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Which of the 12 questions raised by Apple's investment in Didi do you favor ?

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Cars Have Become Complicated, Hackable Computer Systems On Wheels

Cars Have Become Complicated, Hackable Computer Systems On Wheels | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Cars are no longer what they seem to be. On-board computers and their algorithms have invaded all organs, making cars better, but also more susceptible to hacks and invasions of privacy.

Having driven Route 85 between Cupertino and Mountain View a few thousand times, I’m familiar with every rift and gap in the concrete, every subtle camber shift as I follow an habitual, gradual arc through curves and lane changes. Some early Chevrolet episodes aside, I’m behind the wheel of a European vehicle, silent, good lungs, surefooted, precise, the kind of car that translates the driver’s steering motion into a smooth trajectory, no ifs or buts, no need for correction as the suspension takes its time to settle. After 31 years of driving this pleasant road, the feeling doesn’t get old.

A few weeks ago, I drove the familiar route in a new vehicle freshly delivered from Sindelfingen. Something is wrong: The first curve line is “dirty”, it lacks Germanic rigor. At the next curve the steering wheel argues with me, politely but clearly demanding a different trajectory.

When I get back home I look around the dashboard and notice two red indicators that had been hidden by the steering wheel while I was driving. The walkthrough tech at the dealership had set the vessel to autopilot. In retrospect, I should have seen the argumentative steering coming: I had ordered the autopilot and other geeky features that were unknown when I bought my previous chariot just five years ago. On the road, the autopilot had interpreted my steering ‘optimizations’ as daydreaming lane drift and had stepped in to keep me in line.

I disconnect the autopilot and go for a drive; the familiar pleasant feeling returns.

In a 1957 essay about the Citroën DS (pronounced “Déesse”, goddess) Roland Barthes hailed the modern car as

“…the exact equivalent of the great Gothic cathedrals: I mean the supreme creation of an era, conceived with passion by unknown artists…it excites interest less by its substance than by the junction of its components. ”

The striving, energetic copulation of the arts and technologies, the ‘junction of components’ has continued. Cars are now nearly completely penetrated by automation and algorithms.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

CDO stands for "Car Digital Officer" and such role is a incredibly complex one

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LoRa May Not Be for Long Haul at Orange

LoRa May Not Be for Long Haul at Orange | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

On the face of it, Orange has made a pretty strong commitment to LoRa, one of a crop of low-power, wide-area (or LPWA) network technologies designed to support more rudimentary Internet of Things (IoT) services. 

In November, the French incumbent revealed it was building a LoRa network in 17 of France's biggest cities and would gradually roll out the network on a nationwide basis thereafter. A few months earlier, its venture capital arm, Orange Digital Ventures, stumped up $3 million of the $25 million in funding then raised by Actility, a French company developing OSS and BSS functionality for LoRa deployments. (See Telcos Invest in IoT Tech Startup.)

Yet Orange (NYSE: FTE) has acknowledged that LoRa is far from ideal. As an "open" technology, it holds strong attractions for the service provider over Sigfox, another LPWA technology that is fully proprietary. But this openness combined with LPWA's reliance on unlicensed spectrum is also problematic, admits Luc Bretones, the executive vice president of Orange's Technocentre-named product and design facilities.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

May LoRa be as transitional as it looks promising ? Orange's indoor push through combining LoRa lamps with employee crowd-deployment is interesting nonetheless, as is its ambition to cover France by the end of 2016.

But with Intel reportedly readying a line of LTE-narrowband chips in the "couple of bucks" price range we could see the IoT landscape continue to evolve fast as Telcos will try to regain control.

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Emmanuel HAVET's curator insight, March 18, 6:16 AM

May LoRa be as transitional as it looks promising ? Orange's indoor push through combining LoRa lamps with employee crowd-deployment is interesting nonetheless, as is its ambition to cover France by the end of 2016.

But with Intel reportedly readying a line of LTE-narrowband chips in the "couple of bucks" price range we could see the IoT landscape continue to evolve fast as Telcos will try to regain control.

michel verstrepen's curator insight, March 18, 8:53 AM

May LoRa be as transitional as it looks promising ? Orange's indoor push through combining LoRa lamps with employee crowd-deployment is interesting nonetheless, as is its ambition to cover France by the end of 2016.

But with Intel reportedly readying a line of LTE-narrowband chips in the "couple of bucks" price range we could see the IoT landscape continue to evolve fast as Telcos will try to regain control.

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Devialet wants its sound tech in everything you use

Devialet wants its sound tech in everything you use | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

While the Phantom is a product that’s actually for sale in places such as the Apple store, its real purpose is to showcase Devialet’s audio technologies. In a recent interview, Devialet CEO Quentin Sannié explained that the company’s ultimate goal is to get its technology into everything from phones, to cars, to television sets — really, anything that outputs audio.

The Phantom is a showcase for two of Devialet’s developments: a software-based technology called Speaker Active Matching (SAM) and a hardware-based amplification system that combines an analog amp with a digital one. Sannié says that the SAM algorithm could be implemented into any digital signal processor, even the one in your phone, and can improve the sound quality of hundreds of devices. The algorithm is developed by measuring the behavior of each speaker and then creating a mathematical model to control how the speaker behaves. This measurement process can be done in about 10 minutes using special, laser-based tools the company developed for it.

The Phantom is a showcase for Devialet's technologies

Sannié says that a system using SAM can reproduce lower frequencies without changing its hardware at all, and it can even enable noise-cancellation without the need for a subwoofer. It’s part of the reason that the Phantom’s relatively small drivers move so quickly when the volume is cranked up and have little to no distortion. Sannié claims that SAM could even be used by a streaming service to optimize audio before it’s even delivered to a listener. A user could tell the service what kind of speakers or headphones they are using and the sound would be tailored just for them.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Devialet Chief Maestro details his grand music sheet in this interesting feature. La French Tech has a voice !

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George Goodman's curator insight, March 14, 12:50 PM

Devialet Chief Maestro details his grand music sheet in this interesting feature. La French Tech has a voice !

Ty Garibay's curator insight, March 14, 8:10 PM

Devialet Chief Maestro details his grand music sheet in this interesting feature. La French Tech has a voice !

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OOCar is the personal trainer for your car

OOCar is the personal trainer for your car | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Imagine there was a device that could help make your car run quicker, cheaper and help you save the environment? Well that’s what OOCar is offering with its latest service.

The company has a small dongle that you attach to your car’s diagnostics port – every vehicle made after 2001 has one. Once there, it then tracks your car’s performance and sends it to the OOCar app where it can give you tips and advice on how to save cash.

The startup claims it can save you as much as 30 percent on fuel costs and 40 percent on insurance premiums. Not bad.

When the dreaded engine warning light comes on, it can give you a breakdown of the damage and also a rough cost of repairs, so you can tell if a mechanic is trying to pull a fast one. The app is only available in France right now, but the team hopes to start expanding across Europe soon.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

You shall watch this startup and project carefully...

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Jane Shamcey's curator insight, March 10, 2:57 AM

You shall watch this startup and project carefully...

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Swiss watchmakers are hurting thanks to Apple and Samsung

Swiss watchmakers are hurting thanks to Apple and Samsung | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Smartwatches are growing fast, and last quarter, the budding product category shipped more devices than Swiss watches for the first time ever.

According to new data from Strategy Analytics, charted for us by Statista, the global smartwatch shipments reached 8.1 million units in the fourth quarter of 2015, up more than four times what it shipped in the previous year. In the same period, Swiss watches shipped 7.9 million units, down 5% from last year.

Apple and Samsung led the growth, with each accounting for 63% and 16% of the overall smartwatch market, respectively.

Neil Mawston, Executive Director at Strategy Analytics, said part of this had to do with the Swiss watchmakers' slow response to the development of smartwatches.

"The Swiss watch industry has been sticking its head in the sand and hoping smartwatches will go away," he wrote. "Swiss brands, like Tag Heuer, accounted for a tiny 1 percent of all smartwatches shipped globally during Q4 2015, and they are long way behind Apple, Samsung and other leaders in the high-growth smartwatch category.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

It is just a question of time...

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James Moore's curator insight, February 22, 6:03 AM

We can bundle an Apple Smart Watch into any of our iPhone plans on any network - please contact me for further information - Business tariffs only. 

Juan Ortega's curator insight, May 20, 4:53 AM
referentes formas y modelos de smartwatches
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Consensus Décentralisé - Blockchains - Smart Contracts - Decentralized Consensus

Consensus Décentralisé - Blockchains - Smart Contracts - Decentralized Consensus | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

I have decided to offload "Cross Pond High Tech" that may have been perceived recently as being crowded with too many Bitcoin / Blockchain curated links, and have created a new topic dedicated to Decentralized Consensus. It will be both in French and English and is at present managed by several curators including @CHECy and others.

The goal is to build it as a reference repository for e-Litterature on this fast morphing and still highly speculative topic.

-- Fork de Cross Pond High Tech dédié à Blockchain, Ethereum, aux Smart Contracts et au Consensus Décentralisé en général

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

You are welcome to susbcribe to this fork of "Cross Pond High Tech" focusing on Decentralized Consensus ; don't hesitate to submit enlightning and quality content. Thank you for your interest and future contributions !

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Ethereum studio ConsenSys launches 'Internet-of-People' with digital IDs and assets secured on Unbuntu phones

Ethereum studio ConsenSys launches 'Internet-of-People' with digital IDs and assets secured on Unbuntu phones | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

New York City's decentralised apps studio ConsenSys is beginning its "Internet-of-People" campaign with Ethereum-based identity on Ubuntu phones and tablets.

ConsenSys and BlockApps are collaborating with the Ubuntu project's commercial sponsor, Canonical, to deliver web wallet and identity system uPort Biometric Identity tools on Ubuntu devices.

The Nimbus/uPort/Ubuntu proof-of-concept will be unveiled at Mobile World Congress on 22 February, said ConsenSys in a statement.

Nimbus permits users secure interaction with the Ethereum blockchain through biometric protection of cryptographic keys. Through this feature, users will be able to access Ethereum to use decentralised applications (DApps) and develop Ethereum blockchain software.

uPort

uPort represents the next generation of identity systems: the first identity system to enable self-sovereign identity, allowing the user to be in complete control of their identity and personal information, said ConsenSys.

The uPort attestation system allows third-party authorities as well as peers to validate the user's information creating both a rich social fabric as well as powering solid KYC/AML systems in the financial sector. Through uPort's selective disclosure system the user has a total overview over which of their peers, business partners or counterparties can access their information.

Ubuntu

The Ubuntu phone allows total control over the information users distribute online including digital identity. Ubuntu phones and tablets are ideal prototyping tools for building the next generation of mobile blockchain apps as they offer a combined development environment and a testing tool for mobile apps.

As well as inheriting from Ubuntu's security and respect for user's confidentiality, these devices build on strong relation created on the server and cloud side between Ubuntu and Ethereum.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Another move in the Etherealm reminding us how intense the race in decentralized consensus has become, and how critical digital identity management will be to successful deployments.

By the way the social part in uPort is a brilliant ID...

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Philippe J DEWOST's curator insight, February 16, 8:45 AM

Another move in the Etherealm reminding us how intense the race in decentralized consensus has become, and how critical digital identity management will be to successful deployments.

By the way the social part in uPort is a brilliant ID...

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Magic Leap Raises $794 Million And Announces "Mixed Reality Lightfield"

Magic Leap Raises $794 Million And Announces "Mixed Reality Lightfield" | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Magic Leap raised $794 million in new funding and CEO Rony Abovitz posted a blog suggesting the secretive company is moving closer toward a product, writing “we are setting up supply chain operations, manufacturing.”

Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba led the round and Joe Tsai, Alibaba’s Executive Vice Chairman, is getting a seat on the board. The announcement roughly confirms a December report suggesting the company was raising money in this ballpark.

The Series C round puts the Florida startup’s funding to date close to $1.4 billion.

 

Magic Leap also seems to have named its technology “Mixed Reality Lightfield” with subtle language in the blog post linked above that might be commentary about current VR technology, which isn’t able to perfectly reproduce what your eyes see in the real world.

“It comes to life by following the rules of the eye and the brain, by being gentle, and by working with us, not against us,” Abovitz wrote about the company’s technology. “By following as closely as possible the rules of nature and biology.”

Abovitz previously suggested Rift-like VR headsets have a history of “issues that near-eye stereoscopic 3d may cause” and that “we have done an internal hazard and risk analysis….on the spectrum of hazards that may occur to a wide array of users.”

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

The staggering amount raised by MagicLeap is all but virtual and makes Oculus Rift acquisition price look almost "reasonable".#SelfReminder: need to update my "Brief History of Interfaces" slide deck

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Airbus to team with Uber for helicopter ride service

Airbus to team with Uber for helicopter ride service | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Uber has found an unlikely partner for its on-demand services in Airbus, the company announced on Sunday, with the aerospace giant providing helicopters for a pilot project.

 

As part of a new Silicon Valley-based initiative, Airbus has established a partnership with Uber was part of an experiment that would allow Uber users to hail copters, as well as other forms of transportation.

The recently-formed Airbus Ventures will operate with $150 million commitment to "identify and invest in the most visionary entrepreneurs in the global aerospace ecosystem," Airbus said in a release.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Airbus is going Übercopter

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Jean-Simon Venne's curator insight, January 22, 1:27 PM

Airbus + Uber = AirUber....

Download Android Games's comment, January 31, 6:57 AM
Nice
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US is closing in on 50-state gigabit goal

US is closing in on 50-state gigabit goal | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

It’s been almost three years since former FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski set a goal of having at least one gigabit network in every state by 2015. The year is now over and by Telecompetitor’s tally, we didn’t quite make it – but we’re close.

We combed through our archives and other online resources and, by our tally, at least one network operator has announced plans to offer gigabit service in every state. Not all of these networks are actually deployed or supporting service yet. But generally network operators don’t announce specific markets more than a year or two in advance of when they expect to deliver service. If, for example, a network operator simply said it would eventually upgrade its entire footprint beginning in 2016, as Cox Communications did, we didn’t count the company’s entire footprint, only the states it provided more details on.

We also didn’t count a deployment unless plans included residential users. Clearly Genachowski wasn’t talking about gigabit Ethernet service to commercial buildings when he set the gigabit goal.

Gigabit States Even heavily rural states – states such as Wyoming, West Virginia, or Maine – made the list, thanks to a wide range of small locally-focused telcos, utilities, municipal network operators, and others. Even though deployment costs tend to be higher in rural areas, entities with a local focus often manage to find a way to make gigabit happen – and in the telco arena, many companies already had fiber-to-the-home networks, making it relatively easy to upgrade to a gigabit.

Another thing that helped put all 50 states on the gigabit map was that tier one or tier two telco and cable operators that had not previously announced gigabit plans decided to get in on the trend.

On the cable side, Comcast in 2015 launched an FTTH-based 2 gigabit service dubbed Gigabit Pro in several states – albeit in limited parts of each market. Smaller cablecos such as Cable One, Suddenlink, Mediacom  and Troy Cable also made gigabit plans.

And we’re likely to see a lot more from the cable companies in 2016 as they begin to deploy DOCSIS 3.1, which supports gigabit speeds.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Looks like serious catchup is on its way. Wondering how ambitious EU next plan will be...

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Scality CEO says French startup scene is booming

Scality CEO says French startup scene is booming | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
The French startup ecosystem is booming. Its exponential growth started about 5 years ago, and now attracts more and more of the young talent. See this.France was not historically seen as a startup country, and it wasn't. But things have changed. It is now the second largest startup ecosystem in Europe (after UK, but ahead of Germany), and may be about to become the first.There are some amazing initiatives like Ecole 42, which just launched in Silicon Valley as well.It is becoming recognised in Silicon Valley. As an example, John Chambers has on numerous occasions mentioned that he saw huge potential in the French startup ecosystem; for example, in a Fortune article.I expect that we will see the spirit of startup go beyond tech, and enter other industries where France has real knowledge, like food and fashion.
Philippe J DEWOST's insight:
Great interview of Scality CEO by TheRegister. Jérôme Lecat has been a first hour supporter of La French Tech and very clearly explains how to articulate your startup between France and the US, debunking a few myths underway...
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Apple R&D Reveals a Pivot Is Coming

Apple R&D Reveals a Pivot Is Coming | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

People are focusing on the wrong thing when analyzing Apple's path forward in the face of slowing iPhone sales. Instead of debating how much Apple will try to monetize the iPhone user base with services (not as much as consensus thinks), the company is instead planning its largest pivot yet. There are only a handful of logical explanations for Apple's current R&D expense trajectory, and all of them result in a radically different Apple. In a few years, we are no longer going to refer to Apple as the iPhone company. 

As I pointed out last May, Apple's R&D expense saw a significant bump up beginning in mid-2014. It was clear Apple was up to something big. However, after looking at Apple's 2Q16 results, it appears I underestimated the situation. As depicted in Exhibit 1, Apple is now on track to spend more than $10 billion on R&D in 2016, up nearly 30% from 2015 and ahead of even my aggressive estimate. This is a remarkable feat considering that Apple was spending a little over $3 billion per year on R&D just four years ago.

One of the more interesting aspects of Apple's R&D expense trajectory in recent years is that the increase has been outpacing revenue growth. As seen in Exhibit 2, given my current iPhone sales expectations for FY16 and FY17, Apple is on track to approach a multi-decade record in terms of amount spent on R&D as a percent of revenue. 

Unusual R&D Perceptions

The most shocking aspect about the amount of money Apple is spending on R&D is how little attention it has garnered in Silicon Valley and on Wall Street. Other than my R&D post last year, there is rarely any mention of Apple's R&D, and this doesn't seem to make much sense.

I suspect most of this has been due to the fact that Apple does not draw attention to its product pipeline and long-term strategy, choosing instead to embrace secrecy and mystery. Now compare this to Mark Zuckerberg laying out his 10-year plan for Facebook. It is easy and natural for people to then label Facebook as innovative and focused on the future. The same principle applies to Larry Page reorganizing Google to make it easier for investors to see how much is being spent on various moonshot projects. Jeff Bezos is famous for his attitude towards failing often and in public view, giving Amazon an aura of being a place of curiosity and boldness when it comes to future projects and risk taking. 

Meanwhile, Tim Cook has remained very tight-lipped about Apple's future, which gives the impression that Apple isn't working on ground-breaking ideas or products that can move the company beyond the iPhone. Instead of labeling this as a mistake or misstep, Apple's product secrecy is a key ingredient of its success. People like to be surprised. Another reason Apple takes a much different approach to product secrecy and R&D is its business model. Being open about future product plans will likely have a negative impact on near-term Apple hardware sales. Companies like Facebook and Google don't suffer from a similar risk. The end result is that there is a legitimate disconnect between Apple's R&D trends and the consensus view of the company's product pipeline. Apple is telling us that they are working on something very big, and yet no one seems to notice or care. I find that intriguing.

Logical Explanations for Apple R&D

Even though Apple remains tight-lipped about its dramatic increase in R&D expense, there are three logical explanations for what may be happening.

1) Apple's expanded product line requires additional R&D. This theory represents the most straightforward explanation. Essentially, because Apple has grown significantly over the years, the company needs to spend more on R&D just to keep up with its more expansive product line and greater competition. The company is now invested in four hardware categories (iPhone, iPad, Mac and Apple Watch), not to mention various software and services initiatives. 

2) Apple plans on doing more. Keeping with another simple explanation, Apple's increased R&D spend could signal that the company is willing to try its hand at more things. The expectation would be that Apple will begin releasing a greater number of products in terms of hardware, software and services. 

3) Apple is looking to pivot. Apple is ramping up R&D because they have a few big bets that require a massive increase in investment. The two most logical areas for these bets are wearables and personal transport initiatives. In both cases, Apple is moving well beyond its comfort zone of selling pieces of glass that can be held in one's hand. Instead, Apple is literally building a new company with additional capabilities and strengths.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Drowning by Numbers ; Apple might be surprising us again by opening entirely new product / service categories and they have the resources for doing so.

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, May 15, 2:12 PM

Apple Pivot, Will We Care
Agree. Apple is looking for another disruption not looking to milk iPhone / iPad sales. And this is an understatement:

"I suspect most of this has been due to the fact that Apple does not draw attention to its product pipeline and long-term strategy, choosing instead to embrace secrecy and mystery. "

Open vs. Closed
The bigger question, for us, is the OPEN vs. CLOSED question. Apple hasn't made friends in the developer community. Sure we bend, scrape, plead and cry to have apps accepted, but the taste left with us is sour and painful. 

Android is trying to tighten standards having played, "Come One, Come All" a tad too loudly, but Apple is fickle and a pain. Yes it is good to be KING, but no one is KING of anything lasting that doesn't also inspire loyalty, trust and love. 

Most of the developers I know, even the ones who are rich thanks to Apple's app store, don't look forward to wrestling with Apple again. Some have achieved "trusted" status now, but they remember the blood and tears it took to get there. 

So note to Google, never tighten to the point where your tightening feels or seems capricious and mean. Apple has seemed capricious and mean to several developer friends who requested to remain nameless. Were they scared Apple might make a horrible process even harder? You bet. 

Apple is testimony to the power of "insanely great". NO ONE jumps through the seemingly arbitrary hoops Apple is known for unless "insanely great" is attached. I'm a huge Apple fan and have been since buying the Apple II back in the day. 

Lately I've caught myself wondering if the OVER (what I gain by being an Apple supporter) is worth the UNDER (what it takes to remain loyal). That is a conversation NO BRAND wants their customers to begin EVER since all the negative things leaving brings follows. 

The watch left me cold. I rarely wear watches anymore, but when I do I want something from MoMA and their tiny phone on your wrist looked more Dick Tracy than cool watch (to me). I'm wearing a watch to dinner tonight and it won't be an Apple Watch. 

My updated AIR is nothing but a pain. It doesn't fit my hands, the keyword is impossible to tune, and the screen too small. I never use it preferring my old Air (from 6 years ago). I love my iMac with the huge screen (what I'm writing on now), but it too was a failure. 

We tried moving my 83-year-old father over to the big Mac screen but accessibility features were a torture and he is a Windows guy and will remain one. My Macbook I like, but it is getting long in the tooth and clunky. My iPad Pro I LOVE and that is taking the place of the new AIR (that I hate) and my MacBook. 

Long diatribe, but I share my journey as a note of growing Apple frustration. My new EXPENSIVE Air was a disaster I should have sent back, but I kept thinking it was me. I don't think that way anymore and that can't be good for Apple. 

Juan Ortega's curator insight, May 20, 4:34 AM
Historia de Apple con número de unidades vendidas de cada producto
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Why The Unicorn Financing Market Just Became Dangerous...For All Involved — On the Road to Recap by Bill Gurley

In February of last year, Fortune magazine writers Erin Griffith and Dan Primack declared 2015 “The Age of the Unicorns” noting — “Fortune counts more than 80 startups that have been valued at $1 billion or more by venture capitalists.” By January of 2016, that number had ballooned to 229. One key to this population growth has been the remarkable ease of the Unicorn fundraising process: Pick a new valuation well above your last one, put together a presentation deck, solicit offers, and watch the hundreds of million of dollars flow into your bank account. Twelve to eighteen months later, you hit the road and do it again — super simple.

While not obvious on the surface, there has been a fundamental sea-change in the investment community that has made the incremental Unicorn investment a substantially more dangerous and complicated practice. All Unicorn participants — founders, company employees, venture investors and their limited partners (LPs) — are seeing their fortunes put at risk from the very nature of the Unicorn phenomenon itself. The pressures of lofty paper valuations, massive burn rates (and the subsequent need for more cash), and unprecedented low levels of IPOs and M&A, have created a complex and unique circumstance that many Unicorn CEOs and investors are ill-prepared to navigate.

Many have noted that the aggregate shareholder value created by all of the Unicorns will vastly overshadow the losses from the inevitable failed unicorns. This likely truism is driven by the clear success of this generation’s transformational companies (AirBNB, Slack, Snapchat, Uber, etc). While this could provide some sense of comfort, most are not exposed to a Unicorn basket, and there is no index you can buy. Rather, most participants in the ecosystem have exposure to and responsibility for specific company performance, which is exactly why the changing landscape is important to understand.

Perhaps the seminal bubble-popping event was John Carreyrou’s October 16th investigative analysis of Theranos in the Wall Street Journal. John was the first to uncover that just because a company can raise money from a handful of investors at a very high price, it does not guarantee (i) everything is going well at the company, or (ii) those shares are permanently worth the last round valuation. Ironically, Carreyou is not a Silicon Valley-focused reporter, and the success of the piece served as a wake-up call for other journalists who may have been struck by Unicorn fever. Next came Rolfe Winkler’s deep dive “Highly Valued Startup Zenefits Runs Into Turbulence.” We should expect more of these in the future.

In late 2015, many public technology companies saw a significant retrenchment in their share prices primarily as a result of a reduction in valuation multiples. A high performing, high-growth SAAS company that may have been worth 10 or more times revenue was suddenly worth 4-7 times revenue. The same thing happened to many Internet stocks. These broad-based multiple contractions have an immediate impact on what investors are willing to pay for the more mature private companies.

Late 2015 also brought the arrival of “mutual fund markdowns.” Many Unicorns had taken private fundraising dollars from mutual funds. These mutual funds “mark-to-market” every day, and fund managers are compensated periodically on this performance. As a result, most firms have independent internal groups that periodically analyze valuations. With the public markets down, these groups began writing down Unicorn valuations. Once more, the fantasy began to come apart. The last round is not the permanent price, and being private does not mean you get a free pass on scrutiny.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

A must read article for anybody feeling sometimes we are playing Lego without the notice.

The conclusion below shall not relieve you from going through Bill Gurely's analysis of how this is different from the internet bubble :

"The reason we are all in this mess is because of the excessive amounts of capital that have poured into the VC-backed startup market.

This glut of capital has led to (1) record high burn rates, likely 5-10x those of the 1999 timeframe, (2) most companies operating far, far away from profitability, (3) excessively intense competition driven by access to said capital, (4) delayed or non-existent liquidity for employees and investors, and (5) the aforementioned solicitous fundraising practices. More money will not solve any of these problems — it will only contribute to them.

The healthiest thing that could possibly happen is a dramatic increase in the real cost of capital and a return to an appreciation for sound business execution."

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40 Years Later: Apple 3.0

40 Years Later: Apple 3.0 | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

In the past 40 years our personal computers have, of course, become immensely more powerful and convenient, but the roots of our interest in personal computing haven’t changed. And, against many odds Apple, has become a giant, world-spanning, immensely rich company.

In retrospect, we can see three Apple eras.

 

Apple 1.0 was a turbulent period: The rise of the Apple ][, its loss to the IBM PC and Microsoft; the hope and trouble with the Macintosh; Jobs forced out followed by a succession of “professional” CEOs and progressively deteriorating finances.

In retrospect, Jobs’ departure from Apple was one of the best things that happened to him and the company he co-founded. If hadn’t left for an outside tour, the Pixar success and the NeXT technical achievements and business challenges, he wouldn’t have been able to return and jump start the company’s next phase.

 

Apple 2.0 began in late 1996 when Jobs managed what turned out to be a reverse acquisition of Apple. We owe much gratitude to then-CEO Gil Amelio who unwittingly saved the company hiring Steve to “advise” him. Jobs’ advice? Show Amelio the door and install himself as “interim” CEO. Jobs then made an historic deal with Bill Gates which gave him time to let his team of NeXT engineers completely rebuild the Mac OS on a modern Unix foundation. Steve also rummaged through the company and found Jony Ive who gave us the colorful iMacs, the first of a series of admired designs.

What followed is recognized as the most striking turnaround story in any industry, one that has been misunderstood and pronounced as doomed at almost every turn. The list of Jobs’ “mistakes” includes killing the Macintosh clone program by canceling Mac OS licenses; getting rid of floppies and, later, CD/DVD-ROMs (mostly); entering the crowded MP3 player field; introducing iTunes and the micropayment system; the overpriced, underpowered $500 iPhone; the stylus-free iPad (ahem)…

We’ve seen the punishment for these mistakes: Apple sells approximately $250B worth of iPhones every year, that’s six phones every second manufactured and delivered to more than 130 countries.

Despite it’s enormous size and influence, Apple’s business remains simple to understand. The company makes personal computers, as illustrated in this telling line-up:

 

Personal computers, small, medium and large.

Everything else Apple does — from iTunes to iCloud storage, apps and accessories — has one and only one raison d’être: Push up the volumes and margins of the company’s personal computers.

Steve Jobs left us in early October 2011, Too Soon, as I wrote in my heartfelt homage to the once unmanageable co-founder who turned into a manager extraordinaire, captain of industry, and editor-in-chief of a team of designers, engineers, supply-chain managers, and finance experts.

We’re now in the Apple 3.0 era, under Tim Cook’s leadership.

 

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

"Apple sells approximately $250B worth of iPhones every year, that’s six phones every second manufactured and delivered to more than 130 countries." A nice and very well written happy birthday anticipated note as Apple is turning 40 and keeps being both exciting, challenging, and not fully predictable. By one of my former board members.

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Buzzy Bee's curator insight, March 31, 4:35 PM

"Apple sells approximately $250B worth of iPhones every year, that’s six phones every second manufactured and delivered to more than 130 countries." A nice and very well written happy birthday anticipated note as Apple is turning 40 and keeps being both exciting, challenging, and not fully predictable. By one of my former board members.

Buzzy Bee's curator insight, March 31, 4:53 PM

"Apple sells approximately $250B worth of iPhones every year, that’s six phones every second manufactured and delivered to more than 130 countries." A nice and very well written happy birthday anticipated note as Apple is turning 40 and keeps being both exciting, challenging, and not fully predictable. By one of my former board members.

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Need Help in Grep

Need Help in Grep | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Over the past years, I have found AppleScript very efficient when it comes to manipulate and process Contact or Agenda information on a Mac, either to detect and process duplicates, as well as for updating dozens of contacts when corporate mail domaine changes, building and maintaining mailing lists through specific tags in the "Notes" field, or processing boucing emails "en masse" to clean up address book after season's greetings.

 

ics-file-cleaner is An AppleScript designed to process and trim (organizers, attendees, requests) .ics files sent from Outlook before importing them in iCal.

This is the only way to avoid iCal resending or confirming invites via Outlook, or canceling an invent and notifying attendees while you just removed it from iCal.

 

The following AppleScript is triggered by a mail rule and process the .ics file content before opening it with iCal/Calendar app - which results in an import.

 

It has been posted on GitHub so it can be forked and improved beyond my basic and remnant AppleScript skills.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Need help on #grep : I am almost done automating line / tag removal on .ics files for certain attributes (like meeting attendees email addresses) yet am stuck in making the grep command wrap properly on long .ics lines, resulting in truncated email adresses garbage remaining on some lines.

Thx in advance for any enhancements you can bring directly on GitHub or any grep advice you can DM me !

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Google and Facebook Team Up to Open Source the Gear Behind Their Empires

Google and Facebook Team Up to Open Source the Gear Behind Their Empires | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Half a decade ago, Jonathan Heiliger compared the world of Internet data centers to Fight Club.

It was the spring of 2011, and the giants of the Internet—including Google, Amazon, and Microsoft—were erecting a new kind of data center. Their online empires had grown so large that they could no longer rely on typical hardware from the likes of Dell, HP, and IBM. They needed hardware that was cheaper, more streamlined, and more malleable. So, behind the scenes, they designed this hardware from scratch and had it manufactured through little-known companies in Asia.

This shadow hardware market was rarely discussed in public. Companies like Google saw their latest data center hardware as a competitive advantage best kept secret from rivals. But then Facebook tore off the veil. It open sourced its latest server and data center designs, freely sharing them with the world under the aegis of a new organization called the Open Compute Project. “It’s time to stop treating data center design like Fight Club and demystify the way these things are built,” said Heiliger, then the vice president of technical operations at Facebook. 

Google was the first company to rethink data center design for the modern age.

With the Open Compute Project, Facebook aimed to create a whole community of companies that would freely share their data center designs, hoping to accelerate the evolution of Internet hardware and, thanks to the economies of scale, drive down the cost of this hardware. That, among other things, boosts the Facebook bottom line. It worked—in a very big way. Microsoft soon shared its designs too. Companies like HP and Quanta began selling this new breed of streamlined gear. And businesses as diverse as Rackspace and Goldman Sachs used this hardware to expand their own massive online operations. Even Apple—that bastion of secrecy—eventually joined the project.

Two big holdouts remained: Google and Amazon. But today, that number dropped to one. At the annual Open Compute Summit in San Jose, California, Google announced that it too has joined the project. And it’s already working with Facebook on a new piece of open source hardware.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Open Compute has been transformative since day 1, and with Google finally joining, the number of missing elephants in the room has dramatically reduced.

What still puzzles me is the loud silence of European players in the field although we have a tremendous breed of companies and talent in that space. #HardwareIsNotDead

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Gerald Black's curator insight, March 10, 9:27 AM

Open Compute has been transformative since day 1, and with Google finally joining, the number of missing elephants in the room has dramatically reduced.

What still puzzles me is the loud silence of European players in the field although we have a tremendous breed of companies and talent in that space. #HardwareIsNotDead

George Goodman's curator insight, March 10, 10:09 AM

Open Compute has been transformative since day 1, and with Google finally joining, the number of missing elephants in the room has dramatically reduced.

What still puzzles me is the loud silence of European players in the field although we have a tremendous breed of companies and talent in that space. #HardwareIsNotDead

Agra hotal's curator insight, March 10, 11:27 AM

Book Now Hotel with cheap rate near Tajmahal on http://www.hotelatagra.com

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Streamroot evidences the business case for P2P video streaming

Streamroot evidences the business case for P2P  video streaming | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Streamroot harnesses the latest web technologies (HTML5 and WebRTC) and powerful proprietary algorithms to offer state-of-the-art P2P streaming.


Streamroot improves on traditional unicast video delivery by decentralizing exchanges and providing content via multiple sources. 

With Streamroot, viewers begin loading video content directly from your server. At the same time, they connect to the Streamroot tracker, retrieve an intelligently selected list of peers, and establish a direct connection with them to exchange video segments. 

Segments come from the source that provides them most quickly, improving exchanges, heightening reliability and better managing traffic.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

P2P has often been too easily associated with its early "uses cases" that often involved unauthorized content distribution. Streamroot reminds us that technology is neutral and apparently has found an interesting business model.

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6 IoT startups that are making your stuff smarter

6 IoT startups that are making your stuff smarter | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Every year, The Next Web holds hundreds of interviews with young startups in order to shortlist the cream of the crop and invite them to Boost, our early-stage growth program at The Next Web Conference.

With the eleventh edition of our flagship Amsterdam conference coming up in May .../...

This week, we’ve selected six Internet of Things startups that are sure to make your stuff smarter. Whether it’s keeping up to date with your home’s power usage and security, or saving money by changing your driving habits, there’s bound to be something here for your wish list.

Check out the six companies that have been invited to participate here

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Congratulations to Philippe Chassany and OOCar for being selected by TheNextWeb 

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Technical Roadblock Might Shatter Bitcoin Dreams

Technical Roadblock Might Shatter Bitcoin Dreams | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

A Cornell University study of the system that powers Bitcoin concludes that it cannot become widely used without a major redesign: "The researchers estimate that Bitcoin’s current design could bear at most only about 27 transactions per second, using a block size of four megabytes, without forcing a significant cut in the number of computers powering the currency, making it more centralized. There is general agreement in the Bitcoin community that the system must remain decentralized to prevent the possibility of any company or government controlling the currency.“That’s still a fairly limited throughput,” says Emin Gün Sirer, an associate professor at Cornell who worked on the study. “If you compare it to what a big network like Visa is capable of [or] these imagined futures where computers are paying each other, it’s nowhere in the same vicinity.”Some people believe that Bitcoin can be useful without operating at vast scale, for example functioning as a gold-like asset generally held for long periods. But some of the biggest Bitcoin companies are built on the idea that Bitcoin will come to support a very large transaction volume.Brian Armstrong, CEO and cofounder of Coinbase, which helps people buy, sell, and use Bitcoins and has raised over $100 million, says he believes the currency will become widely used as a means of payment, particularly in the developing world.A company called 21 Inc has raised $121 million from investors, including the networking company Cisco, and says that very small “microtransactions” paid in Bitcoin will become an economic backbone used by people and companies to pay for services and goods such as Wi-Fi, data analysis, or music.Joi Ito, director of the MIT Media Lab, which supports three leading developers of Bitcoin’s code, says that he believes the people working on the currency will be able to find ways it can scale up. But it may not be possible to upgrade Bitcoin’s capacity fast enough to meet the expectations of some investors and the Bitcoin companies they have backed, he says. “I think there are some businesses that have promised returns based on the scaling that are not really reasonable,” says Ito. Ito is a member of MIT Technology Review’s board."

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

7 transactions/s means 220 million per year. Pushing the envelope to the theoretically mentioned 27 transactions/s would allow to reach over 850 million per year. Which, as pointed by @smetsjp , won't be enough to handle the needs for the Chinese or the European population.

Has anybody found a theoretical limit to the Blockchain TPS capabilities as a single distributed transactional system/space ?

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Philippe J DEWOST's curator insight, February 16, 9:04 AM
Very interesting article that should urge us to explore together instead of stating any definite truth about Bitcoin and Blockchain. Please read before reacting...
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Blockstream Raises $55 Million to Build Out Bitcoin’s Blockchain

Blockstream Raises $55 Million to Build Out Bitcoin’s Blockchain | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
Blockstream has raised $55m in Series A funding to continue its work expanding the bitcoin code base for commercial use.

With the news, Blockstream's total funding rises to $76m over two investment rounds. To date, the company's signature technology has been its sidechains offering, currently in testing, which enables the creation of blockchains that can validate data from, and transfer assets to, other blockchains.

Blockstream’s round was led by venture capital firms AXA Strategic Ventures, the venture capital arm of French multinational insurance firm AXA Group; Digital Garage, the Tokyo-based online payments firm co-founded by Joi Ito; and Hong Kong venture capital firm Horizons Ventures.

AME Cloud Ventures, Blockchain Capital and Future\Perfect Ventures were among other investment firms that participated in the deal.

Given the recent interest in private and permissioned blockchains, Blockstream sought to underscore the versatility of its technology as well as its early efforts to bring added functionality to the bitcoin network through interoperable blockchains.

Blockstream CEO Austin Hill told CoinDesk:

"We were one of the first companies that painted a vision for interoperable blockchains, that there wasn’t going to be one blockchain, but many of them, all building off the bitcoin codebase to deliver the technology."

Still, Hill said the company remains dedicated to developing technology for the open-source bitcoin blockchain, which it called the "most mature, well-tested and secure" infrastructure for blockchain services.

"What we would hate to see happen is the most robust and secure blockchain protocol getting left by the wayside if people moved on to different protocols and tech stacks that bitcoin isn’t designed for," Hill continued, adding:

"We believe there is a benefit to society to have all these blockchains be interoperable."
Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Interesting as :

1/ Money continues to flow towards decentralized consensus companies (disclosure : AXA is one of CDC Blockchain Initiative member)

2/ Corporates intensify their presence in either projects or investments

3/ The debate between the Bitcoin Blockchain and other Blockchains is far for being closed despite what consultants or half journalist try to explain

So in-between, let's experiment further ! And together.

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Philippe J DEWOST's curator insight, February 16, 9:05 AM

Interesting as :

1/ Money continues to flow towards decentralized consensus companies (disclosure : AXA is one of CDC Blockchain Initiative member)

2/ Corporates intensify their presence in either projects or investments

3/ The debate between the Bitcoin Blockchain and other Blockchains is far for being closed despite what consultants or half journalist try to explain

So in-between, let's experiment further ! And together.

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FCA's Makoto Seta: 'Blockchains will transform the way regulators work'

FCA's Makoto Seta: 'Blockchains will transform the way regulators work' | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Blockchain technology will transform the way regulators work, according to a member of the wholesale markets team at the Financial Conduct Authority, which is known to support the idea of "RegTech".

Makoto Seta, a senior associate from the trading conduct and settlement policy division at the FCA, was part of a panel hosted by Norton Rose Fulbright at its Unlocking the Blockchain session.


Seta said: "Might the blockchain transform the way the regulators work? I absolutely agree with that. I think there are a lot of benefits to be harnessed from distributed ledger, in terms of traceability and tracking, that makes it easier for us.

"I think regulators do now perceive this to be important; the degree of importance will probably differ between regulators. We look very seriously at it and have been doing that for some time now, looking at the technology and how it's been used. I think the issue that we have is, trying to sort of marry up the technical codes and how that interacts with the legal codes."

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

A very novative (and inspiring) approach by the FCA combining how regulation applies to #Blockchain tech AND how such decentralized consensus could also apply to making regulation more effective.

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Dao Cong Binh's curator insight, January 31, 3:39 AM

Cầu nâng, máy năn khung càng AT09, máy súc rửa kim phun,  MÁY VỆ SINH BUỒNG ĐỐT

Philippe J DEWOST's curator insight, February 16, 9:08 AM

A very novative (and inspiring) approach by the FCA combining how regulation applies to #Blockchain tech AND how such decentralized consensus could also apply to making regulation more effective.

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Judge By Yourself Why DLD Münich Is The Best European Tech Conference of the (First Half) Year

Judge By Yourself Why DLD Münich Is The Best European Tech Conference of the (First Half) Year | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Over 150 speakers and 1000 attendees did touch base at #DLD16. For the 12th time, "Europe's hottest conference on invitation" did bring together the brighest, most curious and open minds from all over the world. You will find most videos available here.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

#DLD16 videos available ! Which one did you prefer ?

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