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Dashlane raises $22 Million to go head-to-head with 1Password

Dashlane raises $22 Million to go head-to-head with 1Password | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Paris- and New York-based Dashlane has raised $22 Million from Bessemer Venture Partners as well as existing investors for their password protection solution, the company announced this week. Born in 2010 as a project by co-founder Bernard Liautaud as Paris engineering school Ecole Centrale de Paris, Dashlane has grown to a service with more than 2 million users, “[enabling] over $1 billion in e-commerce transactions,” as the company points out in their statement about the fundraising.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Very interesting piece written in the bus by @Liam who sat next to me in the bus and picked some of my brain while heading to Orange Institute 12 — Day 1 in Tel Aviv. And congrats anyway to Bernard LIAUTAUD and Emmanuel SCHALIT :)

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Babel phish: In which languages are internet passwords easiest to crack?

Babel phish: In which languages are internet passwords easiest to crack? | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
In which languages are internet passwords easiest to crack?

DESPITE entreaties not to, many people choose rather predictable passwords to protect themselves online. "12345"; "password"; and the like are easy to remember but also easy for attackers to guess, especially with programs that automate the process using lists ("dictionaries") of common choices. Cambridge University computer scientist Joseph Bonneau has recently published an analysis of the passwords chosen by almost 70m (anonymised) Yahoo! users. One interesting result is shown below. The chart shows what percentage of accounts could be cracked after 1,000 attempts using such a dictionary. Amateur linguists can have fun speculating on why the Chinese do so well and the Indonesians do not. But one particularly interesting twist is how little difference using language-specific dictionaries makes. It is possible to crack roughly 4% of Chinese accounts using a Chinese dictionary; using a generic dictionary containing the most common terms from many languages, that figure drops only slightly, to 2.9%. Speakers of every language, it seems, have fairly similar preferences.
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TidBITS: How to Protect Your iCloud Keychain from the NSA

TidBITS: How to Protect Your iCloud Keychain from the NSA | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Apple has released a massive update to its “iOS Security” white paper for IT professionals. It contains more information on iOS security than Apple has ever shared publicly before, including extensive details on Touch ID, Data Protection, network security, application security, and nearly all security-related features, options, and protective controls.

For the first time, we have extensive details on iCloud security. For security professionals like myself, this is like waking up and finding a pot of gold sitting on my keyboard. Along with some of the most impressive security I’ve ever seen, Apple has provided a way to make it impossible for agencies like the NSA to obtain your iCloud Keychain passwords.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

This is getting very serious even if I start worrying for Dashlane

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